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Barry Fitzgerald

  • The Quiet Man [DVD] [1952] The Quiet Man | DVD | (03/06/2013) from £5.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton

  • The Quiet Man [Masters of Cinema] (Blu-ray) [1952] The Quiet Man (Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (30/11/2015) from £9.99  |  Saving you £6.00 (37.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton

  • Going My Way [1944] Going My Way | DVD | (21/02/2005) from £3.89  |  Saving you £6.10 (61.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    When an old and fading St. Dominic's church gets a young new priest (Crosby) things are bound to change. For starters young Father O'Malley meets the crusty old Father Fitzgibbons (Barry Fitzgerald) who doesn't think much of him or his ideas. The two have their differences but O'Malley is able to inspire some neighbourhood roughnecks to open their hearts and minds in a way the old priest simply could not do. Once the change has begun the church starts to find its way back into the

  • Corvette K-225 [DVD] Corvette K-225 | DVD | (09/05/2016) from £6.11  |  Saving you £6.88 (53.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Corvette K-225 is a stirring salute to the heroism of the Corvette crews and commanders who steered Allied convoys through the treacherous, U-Boat-infested Atlantic ocean throughout WWII. The story follows a particularly perilous voyage from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Britain. The nail-biting tension is heightened by our knowledge that the film uses actual historic sea combat footage! Better known previously for his ?tall in the saddle' Western roles, Randolph Scott brings dignity and restraint to the role of a heroic Canadian Navy commander in what's possibly his finest performance. In addition to the thrilling battle scenes, as the doughty Corvette strives to protect the convoys from attack after attack, the film has far greater emotional maturity and depth than most Hollywood wartime action films.Not only is there a terrific supporting cast including Barry Fitzgerald (The Quiet Man), Ella Raines (Hail the Conquering Hero), Thomas Gomez (Key Largo), Noah Beery Jr. (The Rockford Files) and even a glimpse of a young Robert Mitchum (The Night of the Hunter), there's also room for a romantic sub-plot!

  • Bing Crosby Collection - Going My Way / The Bells Of St. Mary's Bing Crosby Collection - Going My Way / The Bells Of St. Mary's | DVD | (08/05/2006) from £39.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The Bells Of St. Mary's (Dir. Leo McCarey 1945): This Going My Way sequel stars Bing Crosby reprising his role as worldly-wise Father Chuck O'Malley and introduces Crosby's beloved song Aren't You Glad You're You? Father O'Malley is transferred to the soon-to-be-condemned school run by Sister Benedict (Ingrid Bergman) and the two quickly match wits and stubbornness eventually finding a middle ground. A surprisingly light touch of sentimentality and humor gives this film by director Leo McCarey a glow of genuine feeling that effortlessly captures viewers' hearts. Going My Way (Dir. Leo McCarey 1944): Youthful Father Chuck O'Malley (Bing Crosby) led a colorful life of sports song and romance before joining the Roman Catholic clergy but his level gaze and twinkling eyes make it clear that he knows he made the right choice. After joining a parish O'Malley's worldly knowledge helps him connect with a gang of kids looking for direction and handle the business details of the church-building fund winning over his aging conventional superior (Barry Fitzgerald). Songs such as Swinging on a Star sparkle and both Crosby and Fitzgerald do a fine job tugging at the heartstrings in a gentle irresistible way that will make viewers return to this lovely film again and again.

  • The Quiet Man (John Wayne) [1952] The Quiet Man (John Wayne) | DVD | (05/06/2006) from £5.44  |  Saving you £4.55 (45.50%)  |  RRP £9.99

    John Ford's The Quiet Man celebrates one of Hollywood's most romantic and enduring epics. The first American feature to be filmed in Ireland's picturesque countryside Ford richly imbued this masterpiece with his love of Ireland and its people. Sean Thornton is an American who swears off boxing after accidentally killing an opponent. Returning to the Irish town of his birth he finds happiness when he falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate. Though he is sorely tempted to pick up the gloves against her brother the town bully Sean is determined not to use his fists. Mary Kate and Sean wed but her brother refuses to pay the dowry. Sean would rather walk away than accept this challenge. Even when his new wife accuses him of cowardice Sean stands firm. But when she boards a train to leave he is finally ready to take matters into his own hands. The resulting fist-fight erupts into the longest brawl ever filmed followed by one of the most memorable reconciliation's in motion picture history!

  • And Then There Were None And Then There Were None | DVD | (27/03/2006) from £6.99  |  Saving you £4.15 (31.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Agatha Christie's ""Ten Little Indians"" has been turned into a film more than once but none can compare with Rene Clair's version. The film begins as eight strangers find themselves on a small boat heading to the island retreat of their mysterious host. The guests have diverse backgrounds but all harbour a dark secret. When they are joined by the cook and a maid they become ten. The host fails to materialize and when the maid plays a recording that accuses each of the guests of mur

  • The Saint Strikes Back [DVD] The Saint Strikes Back | DVD | (25/07/2011) from £9.09  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The Saint is back! George Sanders (All About Eve Man Hunt) tackles another case as ace crime-fighter Simon Templar. Down in San Francisco The Saint gets mixed up with the investigation into a major crime syndicate - who is the mysterious 'Waldeman' who is terrorising the city? Teaming up his old sparring partner Inspector Fernack and the beautiful Val Travers - who has her own reasons for wanting to catch Waldeman - Templar sets out to catch the gangster. But Waldeman is a dangerous adversary and The Saint will have to use all his cunning if he means to trap him...

  • The Naked City [Dual Format Blu-ray + DVD] The Naked City | Blu Ray | (27/10/2014) from £11.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (40.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    There are eight million stories in the Naked City. This is one of them. Jules Dassin followed up his explosive prison picture Brute Force with another slice of hard-boiled crime fiction. Within a decade he’d make Thieves’ Highway Night and the City and Rififi thus confirming Dassin’s position as one of the all-time-great film noir directors. New York the middle of summer. A blonde ex-model is murdered in her bathtub and detectives Muldoon (Barry Fitzgerald) and Halloran (Don Taylor) are assigned to the case. Their investigation will lead them through the entire city from Park Avenue to the Lower East Side culminating in a thrilling climax atop the Williamsburg Bridge. Inspired by the work of the infamous tabloid photographer Weegee The Naked City was the first major Hollywood production to be shot entirely on the streets of New York making use of more than a hundred authentic locations. Both its editing and its cinematographer would earn Academy Awards while the film itself would be recognised by the Library of Congress as one of American cinema’s most significant motion pictures. Special Edition Contents: New high definition digital transfer of the film High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation Original mono 1.0 audio (uncompressed PCM on the Blu-ray) Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired Audio commentary by screenwriter Malvin Wald Jules Dassin at LACMA – a 40-minute interview with Bruce Goldstein in which the director discusses his career The Hollywood Ten – a 1950 documentary short on the ten filmmakers blacklisted from Hollywood for their refusal to name names before the House of Un-American Activities including The Naked City’s screenwriter Albert Maltz Gallery of production stills by infamous photojournalist Weegee Theatrical trailer Reversible sleeve featuring the original poster and newly commissioned artwork by Vladimir Zimakov Collector’s booklet containing new writing on the film by Alastair Philips Barry Salt and Sergio Angelini illustrated with original production stills

  • And then there were None (1945) DVD And then there were None (1945) DVD | DVD | (19/05/2014) from £9.59  |  Saving you £3.40 (26.20%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Based on the Agatha Christie novel Ten Little Indians. Ten strangers are invited to a lonely mansion on a remote island. One by one they are accused of past murders and one by one they die. From one of the world's best-selling crime novels by the world's best-selling author Agatha Christie this is the critically acclaimed original screen adaptation of the quintessential who dunnit.

  • The Quiet Man [1952] The Quiet Man | DVD | (15/01/2001) from £12.78  |  Saving you £-2.79 (-27.90%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding, and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland, but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton

  • Rooney [DVD] Rooney | DVD | (03/03/2014) from £6.49  |  Saving you £6.50 (50.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Irish comedy and based on the novel ‘Rooney’ written by Catherine Cookson. Set in 1950’s Dublin John Gregson is the irrepressible James Ignatious Rooney….the hurling loving dustman. Landladies fall at his feet and it’s not due to the stench of rubbish from his daily collections………… Rooney is too much of a gentleman to bring his work home with him. No it’s the Irish Blarney his good looks and his dog. And don’t forget the hurling always at the hurling. Rooney teams up with Mr Doolan (Liam Redmond) a wealthy businessman and hurling fan and moves to a smart part of Dublin. Here he meets yet another widowed landlady and the cantankerous Grandpa (played brilliantly by the hilarious Barry Fitzgerald) who is always losing his teeth! Rooney falls for Maire (Muriel Pavlow) the landlady’s cousin and when he is selected for the Hurling Championship Final will he win both the Cup Final and the girl?

  • Going My Way/The Glenn Miller Story Going My Way/The Glenn Miller Story | DVD | (26/12/2006) from £7.07  |  Saving you £5.92 (45.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Going My Way (Dir. Leo McCarey): When an old and fading St. Dominic's church gets a young new priest (Crosby) things are bound to change. For starters young Father O'Malley meets the crusty old Father Fitzgibbons (Barry Fitzgerald) who doesn't think much of him or his ideas. The two have their differences but O'Malley is able to inspire some neighbourhood roughnecks to open their hearts and minds in a way the old priest simply could not do. Once the change has begun the church starts to find its way back into the lives of those who live near its doors and its meaning to all involved grows dearer to their souls. The air is filled with music from the classic 'Ave Maria' sung by Metropolitan Opera star Rise Stevens to the Academy Award-winning 'Swinging On a Star'. Also winner of the Oscar for Best Film in 1945. The Glenn Miller Story (Dir. Anthony Mann 1953): The true story of an unassuming band leader and trombonist Glenn Miller (played by James Stewart) who got his first break playing his own arrangement of 'Everybody Loves My Baby' at an audition. He never looked back. He married his childhood sweetheart and everything he played became an instant hit...songs like 'Moonlight Serenade' 'String of Pearls' and 'Tuxedo Junction'. Hollywood beckoned and success piled upon success. But then came World War II. A war from which Glenn Miller never returned. He was on his way to Paris to entertain the American Forces when his plane disappeared. But the show had to go on...and Glenn Miller became a legend. The film features all of Glenn Miller's hits and there are many guest performances who make this film an all time classic. Winner of an Oscar for Best Sound in 1955.

  • The Amazing Mrs Holliday The Amazing Mrs Holliday | DVD | (04/04/2011) from £8.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (30.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A missionary tries to outsmart the U.S. Government and smuggle Chinese orphans into the country....

  • The Quiet Man/Rooster Cogburn/Stagecoach [DVD] [1938] The Quiet Man/Rooster Cogburn/Stagecoach | DVD | (14/09/2009) from £5.38  |  Saving you £7.61 (58.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The Quiet Man (Dir. John Ford 1952): Sean Thornton is an American boxer who swears off the sport after accidentally killing an opponent. Returning to the Irish town of his birth he finds happiness when he falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate. Though he is sorely tempted to pick up the gloves against her brother the town bully Sean is determined not to use his fists. Mary Kate and Sean wed but her brother refuses to pay the dowry. Sean would rather walk away than accept this challenge. Even when his new wife accuses him of cowardice Sean stands firm. But when she boards a train to leave he is finally ready to take matters into his own hands. Rooster Cogburn: (Dir. Stuart Miller) (1975): Two of the most popular stars in screen history are brought together for the first time in the follow up to True Grit. The film returns John Wayne to the role of the rapscallion eye patched whiskey guzzling Deputy Marshall that won him an Academy Award. Katharine Hepburn is prim Eula Goodnight a Bible thumping missionary who teams up with the gun fighter to avenge the death of her father. While in pursuit of the outlaws a warm rapport develops between the rough n' tumble lawman and the flirty reverend's daughter. Stage Coach (Dir. John Ford) (1939): The film is set against the impressive backdrop of Monument Valley in Utah and tells the story of a mixed group of travellers who are making their way across country to Arizona. They are endangered by an Indian War Party and this along with their various characters results in difficulties for the party...

  • The Naked City [DVD] [1948] The Naked City | DVD | (13/07/2009) from £6.49  |  Saving you £13.50 (67.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Master of film noir Jules Dassin directs this influential crime thriller starring Barry Fitzgerald and Don Taylor as two detectives trying to decipher the clues of the vicious murder of the beautiful Jean Dexter. With the tabloids following the story closely the two set to work with an army of detectives and forensic professionals. On discovering Jean's shady relationship with cheating Frank Niles they begin to unravel the clues that some stolen jewelry is leading them on. However with the killer still at large the detectives are in a dangerous position; as they get ever closer to the truth they begin to realise the threat they are putting themselves in.

  • The Quiet Man/Rio Grande The Quiet Man/Rio Grande | DVD | (26/12/2006) from £15.98  |  Saving you £-2.99 (-23.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The Quiet Man (Dir. John Ford 1952): John Ford's The Quiet Man celebrates one of Hollywood's most romantic and enduring epics. The first American feature to be filmed in Ireland's picturesque countryside Ford richly imbued this masterpiece with his love of Ireland and its people. Sean Thornton is an American who swears off boxing after accidentally killing an opponent. Returning to the Irish town of his birth he finds happiness when he falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate. Though he is sorely tempted to pick up the gloves against her brother the town bully Sean is determined not to use his fists. Mary Kate and Sean wed but her brother refuses to pay the dowry. Sean would rather walk away than accept this challenge. Even when his new wife accuses him of cowardice Sean stands firm. But when she boards a train to leave he is finally ready to take matters into his own hands. The resulting fist-fight erupts into the longest brawl ever filmed followed by one of the most memorable reconciliation's in motion picture history! Rio Grande (Dir. John Ford 1950): John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara are embroiled in an epic battle with the Apaches and each other in this John Ford classic. Lt Col. Yorke (Wayne) heads to the Rio Grande to fight a warring tribe. But Yorke faces his toughest battle when his unorthodox plan to outwit the elusive Apaches leads to possible court-martial. Locked in a bloody war he must fight to redeem his honour and save his family.

  • Juno And The Paycock [1930] Juno And The Paycock | DVD | (28/02/2005) from £6.98  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £6.99

    Juno And The Paycock is set in Ireland chronicling the financial and emotional ups and downs of the Boyle clan. When the father learns that he is about to inherit a fortune he and his family go shopping with a vengeance and rack up some serious debts. Furthermore the promise of wealth also makes the Boyles very haughty and they even dump their working-class friends. However the Boyles find themselves in big trouble - financially and otherwise - when it is revealed t

  • Quiet Man/Rooster Cogburn/Stagecoach Quiet Man/Rooster Cogburn/Stagecoach | DVD | (19/11/2007) from £8.17  |  Saving you £6.82 (45.50%)  |  RRP £14.99

    The Quiet Man (Dir. John Ford 1952): Sean Thornton is an American boxer who swears off the sport after accidentally killing an opponent. Returning to the Irish town of his birth he finds happiness when he falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate. Though he is sorely tempted to pick up the gloves against her brother the town bully Sean is determined not to use his fists. Mary Kate and Sean wed but her brother refuses to pay the dowry. Sean would rather walk away than accept this challenge. Even when his new wife accuses him of cowardice Sean stands firm. But when she boards a train to leave he is finally ready to take matters into his own hands. Rooster Cogburn: (Dir. Stuart Miller) (1975): Two of the most popular stars in screen history are brought together for the first time in the follow up to True Grit. The film returns John Wayne to the role of the rapscallion eye patched whiskey guzzling Deputy Marshall that won him an Academy Award. Katharine Hepburn is prim Eula Goodnight a Bible thumping missionary who teams up with the gun fighter to avenge the death of her father. While in pursuit of the outlaws a warm rapport develops between the rough n' tumble lawman and the flirty reverend's daughter. Stage Coach (Dir. John Ford) (1939): One of the all time classic Westerns - considered by many to be the movie that propelled John Wayne to stardom back in 1939. The film is set against the impressive backdrop of Monument Valley in Utah and tells the story of a mixed group of travellers who are making their way across country to Arizona. They are endangered by an Indian War Party and this along with their various characters results in difficulties for the party...

  • And Then There Were None [DVD] [1945] And Then There Were None | DVD | (06/07/2009) from £10.72  |  Saving you £5.27 (33.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    At first glance, René Clair might seem an odd match for Agatha Christie's mystery thriller And Then There Were None, but his buoyant touch is exactly what is missing from so many overly solemn remakes. Ten strangers gather for a mysterious gathering on a secluded island. It turns out to be a farewell party, for they have all been sentenced to die for crimes in their past by a self-appointed judge, jury and executioner who could be one of them. One by one, the guests are systematically dispatched as described in the lyrics of the children's rhyme "Ten Little Indians", while the survivors nervously eye one another, splintering into tenuous alliances until the next murder throws suspicion on someone new. A terrific cast of character actors have a ball with Dudley Nichols's witty script. The flamboyant sparring of Barry Fitzgerald (whose paternal Irish lilt takes a sinister dimension) and Walter Huston is almost upstaged by Roland Young's deadpan drollery. Romantic leads Louis Hayward and June Duprez come off as arch and stiff in a company that includes a sinisterly detached Judith Anderson, a dotty and distracted C Aubrey Smith, and a hilariously flippant Mischa Auer. The story has been remade numerous times under the title of Christie's novel, Ten Little Indians, but never as well as this 1945 version. Clair's effervescent, lively little gem is a fatal drawing-room comedy with a body count and a surreal mood of doom. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

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