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David Duchovny

  • Californication - Season 5 [DVD] Californication - Season 5 | DVD | (16/09/2013) from £12.29  |  Saving you £2.30 (11.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Golden Globe winner David Duchovny is back as the impulsive, talented novelist and screenwriter who returns to L.A. for all 12 episodes from the riveting fifth season. His career may be in the fast lane, but Hank is still stalled when it comes to women. Although he pines for the life he had with former lover Karen (Natascha McElhone) and daughter Becca (Madeleine Martin), his destructive ex-girlfriend has plans for their future and he can't seem to keep his hands off a bevy of new Hollywood b...

  • Aquarius: Season 2 [DVD] Aquarius: Season 2 | DVD | (28/11/2016) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

  • The X Files: Season 3 [1994] The X Files: Season 3 | DVD | (11/10/2004) from £9.09  |  Saving you £25.90 (74.00%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Focused lightning bolts, stigmata, possession, and ancient curses become secondary in Season 3 of The X-Files as more episodes are devoted to pursuing the increasingly complex story threads. "The Blessing Way" is an explosive start, introducing the Syndicate's well-manicured man (John Neville), while Scully's sister Melissa is shot and Mulder experiences Twin Peaks-like prophetic visions. We learn of medical records of millions, including Scully, who have been experimented upon ("Paper Clip"): the fast-paced train-bound two-parter "Nisei" and "731" suggests the experiments are about alien hybridisation. Krycek turns out to be hosting an alien in the next double-act, "Piper Maru" and "Apocrypha", in which Skinner is shot by Melissa's killer. Two great one-offs outside the arc are "Clyde Bruckman's "Final Repose", a bittersweet tale of foreseeing death (featuring an Emmy-winning performance from Peter Boyle) and Jose Chung's "From Outer Space", a spoof of alien conspiracy theories through an author's investigations into abductees. --Paul Tonks

  • X Files Season 4 Boxset [1996] X Files Season 4 Boxset | DVD | (22/04/2002) from £16.94  |  Saving you £73.05 (81.20%)  |  RRP £89.99

    In Season 4 of The X-Files, Scully is a bit upset by her on-off terminal cancer and Mulder is supposed to shoot himself in the season finale (did anyone believe that?), but in episode after episode the characters still plod dutifully around atrocity sites tossing off wry witticisms in that bland investigative demeanour out of fashion among TV cops since Dragnet. Perhaps the best achievement of this season is "Home", the most unpleasant horror story ever presented on prime-time US TV. It's not a comfortable show--confronted with this ghastly parade of incest, inbreeding, infanticide and mutilation, you'd think M & S would drop the jokes for once--but shows a willingness to expand the envelope. By contrast, ventures into golem, reincarnation, witchcraft and Invisible Man territory throw up run-of-the-mill body counts, spotlighting another recurrent problem. For heroes, M & S rarely do anything positive: they work out what is happening after all the killer's intended victims have been snuffed ("Kaddish"), let the monster get away ("Sanguinarium") and cause tragedies ("The Field Where I Died"). No wonder they're stuck in the FBI basement where they can do the least damage. The series has settled enough to play variations on earlier hits: following the liver vampire, we have a melanin vampire ("Teliko") and a cancer vampire ("Leonard Betts"), and return engagements for the oily contact lens aliens and the weasely ex-Agent Krycek ("Tunguska"/"Terma"). Occasional detours into send-up or post-modernism are indulged, yielding both the season's best episode ("Small Potatoes") and its most disappointing ("Musings of a Cigarette-Smoking Man"). "Small Potatoes", with the mimic mutant who tries out Mulder's life and realises what a loser he is (how many other pin-up series heroes get answerphone messages from their favourite phone-sex lines?), works as a genuine sci-fi mystery--for once featuring a mutant who doesn't have to kill people to live--and as character insight. --Kim Newman

  • Beethoven's Complete Dog-Gone Collection [DVD] Beethoven's Complete Dog-Gone Collection | DVD | (16/02/2015) from £13.99  |  Saving you £-1.98 (-16.50%)  |  RRP £12.01

    Includes: Beethoven Beethoven's 2nd Beethoven's 3rd Beethoven's 4th Beethoven's 5th Beethoven's Big Break Beethoven's Christmas Adventure Beethoven's Treasure Tail

  • The X Files: Season 6 [1998] The X Files: Season 6 | DVD | (17/03/2003) from £7.49  |  Saving you £17.01 (48.60%)  |  RRP £34.99

    The sixth series of The X-Files picks up after the events of the big-screen movie. So it is that "The Beginning" attempts to fit the film into the TV chronology before moving on to tackle plot points left dangling from series five's "The End" (note the guard asleep at the nuclear power plant console is named Homer!). Between story arc threads are several pleasing one-off excursions: time travel to a Bermuda Triangle boatload of Nazis ("Triangle"); further temporal escapades akin to Groundhog Day ("Monday"); a demonic baby case featuring genre stalwart Bruce Campbell ("Terms of Endearment"); and "The Dreamland, Parts 1 and 2", in which David Duchovny gets to play someone else via personality switching. Back in the conspiracy scheme of things, Mulder chases "S.R. 819", a Senate resolution tying conspiracies together; "Two Fathers" and "One Son" indicates that the abductee experiments are intended to cure the black oil disease; and the year finishes with "BioGenesis", in which a beach-buried UFO has Scully and the audience wondering if we are from Mars. --Paul Tonks

  • Californication: The Final Season [DVD] Californication: The Final Season | DVD | (18/08/2014) from £8.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (57.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A self-loathing, alcoholic writer attempts to repair his damaged relationships with his daughter and her mother while combating sex addiction, a budding drug problem, and the seeming inability to avoid making bad decisions.

  • Californication: The Fourth Season [DVD] Californication: The Fourth Season | DVD | (13/02/2012) from £10.95  |  Saving you £24.04 (68.70%)  |  RRP £34.99

    The Showtime original series Californication ended Season Three with the bad-boy novelist being hauled off to jail for assaulting the boyfriend of his troublemaking, underage, former fling Mia. His home life with Karen and Becca is in ruins, but the scandal surrounding the publication of his latest book has turned him into a hot Hollywood commodity - in more ways than one. Can Hank navigate the mess he's made of his life and come out on top? Find out with all 12 debaucherous and decadent Season Four episodes in this 2-disc set.

  • Kalifornia [1993] Kalifornia | DVD | (06/05/2002) from £3.95  |  Saving you £11.80 (73.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Directed with a cool remove by Dominic Sena, Kalifornia falls somewhere between Badlands and Natural Born Killers. David Duchovny is a blocked author with a fascination for outlaw killers who hatches a plan to road trip through America's mass-murder landmarks to finish his book. He enlists the help of his frustrated photographer girlfriend Michelle Forbes, who desperately wants to leave the East Coast for LA, and they advertise for riding partners. Luckily for them, they wind up with a veteran killer, the greasy trailer-park ex-con Brad Pitt, who decides to skip parole with his cowering child-woman girlfriend Juliette Lewis. Duchovny is enamoured by gun-toting Pitt's recklessness and lawless disregard for, well, everything--simultaneously terrified and thrilled by Pitt's brutal beating of a barfly. Meanwhile, Pitt's leaving a trail of corpses in their wake. Pitt brings a ferocious magnetism to his part, but it's still hard to buy genial Duchovny's odd attraction; Juliette Lewis conveys a terrifying sense of victimization with her poor dumb creature. Despite the film's best efforts, it never really plumbs the psyche of Pitt's simmering psycho--he's just plain bad, you know--but it does fashion an effective little thriller out of the tensions brewing in the restless quartet. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

  • Phantom [Blu-ray] Phantom | Blu Ray | (19/08/2013) from £3.74  |  Saving you £16.25 (81.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Ed Harris plays the captain of a Cold War Soviet missile submarine who has secretly been suffering from seizures that alter his perception of reality. Forced to leave his wife and daughter, he is rushed into a classified mission, where he is haunted by his past and challenged by a rogue KGB group (led by David Duchovny) bent on seizing control of the ship's nuclear missile. With the fate of humanity in his hands, Harris discovers he's been chosen for this mission in the belief he would fail. ...

  • Return To Me (2000) Return To Me (2000) | DVD | (29/01/2001) from £5.15  |  Saving you £10.84 (67.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A romantic comedy vehicle for X-Files star David Duchovny, Return to Me costars Minnie Driver as Grace, an ailing waitress whose life is saved when she receives a heart transplant. Meanwhile, Duchovny's architect Bob is grieving over the death of his zoologist wife and sweetheart since childhood Elizabeth (Joely Richardson), killed in a car accident. A year on, he agrees to go out on a disastrous blind date redeemed by his encounter with the comely and witty Grace. Abetted by her redoubtable Irish Catholic grandfather (played by Carroll O'Connor), they hit it off and start dating. But when Grace accidentally discovers from whom she received the vital organ that saved her life the blossoming relationship is tested to its utmost. Return to Me is not for the hardboiled cynic-it's a gentle, funny and very charming tragi-comedy. It's sweetly chaste, too, with Grace's self-consciousness about the chest scar from her operation precluding any steamy sex scenes. All this adds to its old-world charm, which is further exacerbated by O'Connor and his ageing restaurant staff's late-night card games, in which they discuss the merits of Sinatra and Dean Martin and generally function as a seven dwarves-type collective to Driver's Snow White. James Belushi also chimes in as the lovably slobbish hubby of Grace's best friend. Ultimately, however, the success of the film is down to the shy chemistry between Duchovny and Driver. On the DVD: The feature itself is presented in 16:9 widescreen. Numerous extras include trailers, a deleted scene, a music video for the featured big band number "What If You Loved Me", and an audio commentary by writer/director Bonnie Hunt, in which she talks about the unpredictable joys of working with Sydney the Gorilla, whose on-screen performance outshines those of many of the humans. --David Stubbs

  • The X Files: Season 6 [1994] The X Files: Season 6 | DVD | (27/12/2004) from £9.50  |  Saving you £24.20 (69.20%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Mulder and Scully return from Antarctica to discover they've been reassigned and are no longer a part of The X-Files. Their frustration turns to fear when Cassandra Spender a woman who claims to have been abducted the same night as Mulder's sister reappears with claims of an alien threat. But it is an extraterrestrial artefact found off the coast of Africa which may hold the key to the very origins of life on Earth and which has an unexplained and deadly effect on Mulder. Episod

  • Beethoven Beethoven | DVD | (04/08/2008) from £3.01  |  Saving you £6.00 (60.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A St. Bernard puppy 'adopts' a new home after escaping from dog thieves. The Newton family just haven't realised the trouble that 185 pounds of dog can get into...

  • The X Files: Season 1 [1994] The X Files: Season 1 | DVD | (06/11/2000) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £34.99

    In the first season of The X Files, creator Chris Carter was uncertain of the series' future, so each of the episodes is a self-contained suspense story; they do not delve deep into the ongoing X Files mythology or turn to self-parody and humour as do episodes in later seasons. Yet, these episodes display the elements for which the show would become famous: the cinematic production values and top-notch special effects, the stark lighting of the Vancouver sets, the atmospheric halo of Mark Snow's score, and the clever plots dealing with subjects ranging from the occult, religion, and monsters to urban legends, conspiracy theories and science fiction. Most importantly, Season 1 introduces FBI agents Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) and Fox "Spooky" Mulder (David Duchovny), two of the most attractive government officials around. Scully is the serious-minded medical scientist assigned to join Mulder on the X Files, a division of the FBI dealing with the paranormal. Mulder is the intuitive thinker with a dry wit, a passionate believer in the existence of paranormal phenomena and one of the few characters on television smart enough to figure out who the bad guy is before the audience does. Their muddled relationship, a deep friendship laced with sexual tension, provides the human heart in a world where the bizarre and horrible lurk in everyday society. The materials on the bonus disc provide some interesting trivia and background, but it is the 24 episodes themselves that make this seven-disc boxed set a true find. Those unfamiliar with The X Files often view all the fuss with the same scepticism with which Scully first regards her new partner's ideas. But just as she comes to realise the uncanny accuracy of Mulder's outlandish theories, newcomers to The X Files who sample a few episodes in this boxed set will likely find themselves riveted to their television late into the night. And undoubtedly, the shadows and creaking noises in the house that evening will seem more menacing than usual. --Eugene Wei, Amazon.com

  • The X Files : Series 7 [1999] The X Files : Series 7 | DVD | (22/09/2003) from £9.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    With the original conspiracy plot arc fallen into a muddle of loose ends no-one could possibly fathom, once-hungry lead actors on the verge of big screen careers and making demands for more time off or shots at writing and directing, and the initial wish list of monsters-of-the-week long exhausted, it's a miracle The X Files is still making its airdates, let alone managing something pretty good every other show and something outstanding at least once every four episodes. Season seven opens with a dreary two-parter ("Sixth Extinction" and "Amor Fati") and winds up with the traditional incomprehensible cliffhanger ("Requiem"), but along the way includes a clutch of shows that may not match the originality of earlier seasons but still effortlessly equal any other fantasy-horror-sf on American television. Highlights in this clutch: "Hungry", a brain-eating mutant story told from the point of view of a monster who tries to control his appetite by going to eating disorder self-help groups; "The Goldberg Variation", a crime comedy about a weaselly little man who has the gift of incredible good luck, which means Wile E Coyote-style doom for anyone who crosses him; "The Amazing Maleeni", guest-starring Ricky Jay in a rare non-fantastic crime story about a feud between stage magicians that turns out to be a cover for a heist; "X-Cops", a brilliant skit on the US TV docusoap Cops with Mulder and Scully caught on camera as they track an apparent werewolf in Los Angeles (season-best acting from David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson); "Theef", a complex revenge drama with gaunt Billy Drago as a hillbilly medicine man stalking a slick doctor; "Brand X", a horror comic tale of corruption in the tobacco industry; "Hollywood AD" (written and directed by Duchovny), in which Tea Leoni and Garry Shandling are cast as Scully and Mulder in a crass movie version of a real-life X file; and "Je Souhaite", a deadpan comedy about a wry, cynical genie at the mercy of trailer trash masters who haven't an idea what to wish for. Among the disasters are: "Fight Club", a grossly laboured comedy; "All Things", Gillian Anderson's riotously pretentious religious-themed writing-directing debut; "En Ami", written and understood by William B Davis, the cigarette-smoking villain; and the very silly "First Person Shooter", the lamest killer video-game plot imaginable courtesy of distinguished guest writer William Gibson. Still essential, despite the occasional pits, but yet again you go away thinking that the next season had better come up with some answers. --Kim Newman

  • X-Files - I Want To Believe (1-Disc Edition) X-Files - I Want To Believe (1-Disc Edition) | DVD | (24/11/2008) from £2.40  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The supernatural thriller is a stand-alone story in the tradition of some of the show's most acclaimed and beloved episodes and takes the always-complicated relationship between Fox Mulder (Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Anderson) in unexpected directions. Mulder continues his unshakable quest for the truth and Scully the passionate ferociously intelligent physician remains inextricably tied to Mulder's pursuits.

  • The X Files: Season 2 [1994] The X Files: Season 2 | DVD | (30/04/2001) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Season Two, the 1994-95 run, of The X Files was the one where creator Chris Carter, having had a surprise hit when he expected a one-season wonder, started trying to make sense of all the storylines he had thrown into the pile in the first year. Moreover, he had to cope with Gillian Anderson's maternity leave by having Scully get abducted by aliens (back then, a pretty fresh device) for a few episodes and come back strangely altered. The season also inaugurated the tradition of opening ("Little Green Men") and closing ("Anasazi") with the show's worst episodes, both pot-boiling attempts to keep the alien infiltration/government conspiracy balls up in the air while seeming to offer narrative forward-thrusts or revelations.But it's also a show noticeably surer of itself than Season One, with its stars reading from the same page in terms of their characters' relationship and attitudes to the wondrous. Scully's no-longer-workable scepticism finally starts to erode in the face of Mulder's increasingly cracked belief. There are fewer marking-time leftover-monster-of-the-week shows--although we do get a human fluke ("The Host"), vampires ("3"), an invisible rapist ("Excelsius Dei") voodoo ("Fresh Bones")--and the flying-saucer stories at last seem to be going somewhere. The powerful two-episode run ("Duane Barry", "Ascension") features Steve Railsback as Mulder's possible future, an FBI agent burned out after a UFO abduction who has become a hostage-taking terrorist, which climaxes with Scully's disappearance into the light. The standout episode is also a stand-alone--"Humbug"--the first and still most successful of the show's self-parodies (written by Darin Morgan, who had played the Flukeman in "The Host"), in which the agents investigate a murder in a circus freakshow, allowing the actors to make fun of the mannerisms they have earnestly built up in a run of solemn, even somnolent, explorations of the murk. Other worthy efforts: "Aubrey", about genetic memory; "Irresistible", a rare (and creepy) straight psycho-chiller with little paranormal content; and "The Calusari", a good ghost/mystery. Rising deputy characters include Nicholas Lea as the perfidious Krycek and Brian Thompson as the shapeshifting alien bounty hunters. Notable guest stars: Charles Martin Smith, C.C.H. Pounder, Leland Orser, Terry O'Quinn, Bruce Weitz, Daniel Benzali, John Savage, Vincent Schiavelli, Tony Shalhoub. --Kim NewmanOn the DVD: The individual episode discs have a small selection of deleted scenes, foreign language clips and behind-the-scenes footage, but the bulk of the extra material is on the final disc. There's not a lot to get to grips with, but what there is consists of a 14-minute documentary about the making of Season Two, with contributions from Chris Carter, various directors, writers and actors (but not the two principals); Carter talking briefly about each episode in turn; a series of short TV spots and pieces about the show's FX and secondary characters; and three very short behind-the-scenes glimpses, one of which has the self-explanatory title "Gillian eats a cricket". There's also a DVD-ROM utility with Web links and a game. --Mark Walker

  • The X Files Movie [1998] The X Files Movie | DVD | (31/01/2000) from £1.97  |  Saving you £8.80 (67.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The definitive American television series of the 1990s. The X-Files comes to the big screen with an anticlimactic whimper. And how could it be otherwise? Why should material so perfectly realised in one medium necessarily translate well into another? The series is crisply and thoughtfully executed in just about every detail, but the heart of its appeal lies in the elegant handling of complicated and evolving ongoing story lines, which is not something movies are especially good at. The big-screen drive for closure cramps the creative style, though it may also help nonfans get a grip on the proceedings. We do get some invigorating thrills and chills, however, and a more satisfying sense of the scale of an all-enveloping human-alien conspiracy than ever before, but there's no more plot development here than in an average two-part season-ending. FBI black sheep Mulder and Scully have been temporarily transferred from the X-Files project to an anti-terrorist unit to investigate an Oklahoma City-style bombing. They uncover a new wrinkle in the Syndicate/Cancer Man conspiracy--basically an attempt to help one bunch of (benign?) aliens fight off another bunch who want to colonise Earth. A spectacular, ice-bound finale thrillingly staged by series-veteran director Rob Bowman offers Mulder (but not a conveniently unconscious Scully) his first clear look at a You Know What, which in some quarters qualifies as an epochal event. Martin Landau offers the agents some crucial clues, and several familiar TV faces (including the Lone Gunmen and Mitch Pileggi's indispensable Assistant Director Skinner) turn up briefly to wink knowingly at faithful fans. --David Chute

  • Californication - Season 1-3 Box Set [DVD] Californication - Season 1-3 Box Set | DVD | (07/02/2011) from £19.11  |  Saving you £50.88 (72.70%)  |  RRP £69.99

    The decadent and hedonistic adventures of famed author Hank Moody (David Duchovny) are only the beginning of the story in the hit Showtime series Californication. He's a lover a frustrated father and a best - selling author with writer's block who still pines for his ex-girlfriend. However he's holding it all together-while falling apart-and he doesn't mind it one bit. This hotly anticipated 3 - Season boxset includes all 36 episodes together for you to enjoy again and again.

  • The X Files: Season 5 [1994] The X Files: Season 5 | DVD | (14/10/2002) from £16.14  |  Saving you £12.58 (36.00%)  |  RRP £34.99

    The fifth season of The X-Files is the one in which the ongoing alien conspiracy arc really takes over, building towards box-office glory for the inevitable cinematic leap in The X-Files Movie (1998). The series opener "Redux" begins with Mulder having been framed for everything going. Scully finally sees a UFO ("The Red and the Black") before being presented with a potential daughter (the two-part "Christmas Carol" and "Emily"). By "The End", there's an enormous tangle of threads for the big-screen adaptation to unravel (or not, as it turned out). Cigarette Smoking Man is being hunted, playing every side against the middle, as well as chasing after information on Mulder's sister. Krycek is back, too, as is an old flame for Mulder in the shape of Agent Diana Fowley. If that wasn't enough to goad viewers into the cinema, there was the Lone Gunmen's 1989-set back story ("Unusual Suspects", with Richard Belzer playing his Homicide: Life on the Streets character), a musical number in the black and white Frankenstein homage "Post Modern Prometheus", and scripts co-written by Stephen King ("Chinga"), William Gibson ("Kill Switch"), and even Darren McGavin (who had inspired the show as Kolchak: The Night Stalker) in "Travellers". On the DVD: The X-Files, Season 5 extras include Chris Carter's commentary over "Post Modern Prometheus", which reveals the decision making behind shooting in black and white as well as the problems it caused. A second commentary is from writer/coproducer John Shiban on "Pine Bluff Variant", where he openly admits the influence of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. Across the six discs (only 20 episodes because of the movie of course) you get credits for every episode, their TV promo spots, deleted and international versions of several scenes (some with commentary from Carter), and a couple of TV featurettes. The best of these is "The Truth About Season 5", talking to an excited Dean Haglund (Langly) amongst other crew members.--Paul Tonks

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