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Gabriel Byrne: List of Movies, Films and TV Shows

  • Little Women [1995] Little Women | DVD | (17/03/2000) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The flaws are easily forgiven in this beautiful version of Louisa May Alcott's novel. A stirring look at life in New England during the Civil War, Little Women is a triumph for all involved. We follow one family as they split into the world, ending up with the most independent, the outspoken Jo (Winona Ryder). This time around, the dramatics and conclusions fall into place a little too well, instead of finding life's little accidents along the way. Everyone now looks a bit too cute and oh, so nice. As the matron, Marmee, Susan Sarandon kicks the film into a modern tone, creating a movie alive with a great feminine sprit. Kirsten Dunst (Interview with the Vampire) has another showy role. The young ensemble cast cannot be faulted, with Ryder beginning the movie in a role akin to light comedy and crescendos to a triumphant end worthy of an Oscar. --Doug Thomas

  • The Usual Suspects -- Two-Disc Special Edition [1995] The Usual Suspects -- Two-Disc Special Edition | DVD | (29/04/2002) from £2.79  |  Saving you £14.80 (64.40%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Bryan Singer's film noir The Usual Suspects casts a mesmerising spell, with the plot luring the viewer into ever-deeper and darker places. According to director, Singer, the premise for the film evolved from a magazine article. What does the phrase "usual suspects" actually mean, who are they and what happens when you probe their identity? Here, they are five expert criminals and a crippled con man in a line-up. The story, told via flashbacks, interrogation scenes and explosive sequences of a heist gone wrong, is a labyrinth of sub-plots and red herrings. Kevin Spacey won a best supporting actor Oscar for his intriguing, blank-eyed turn as the crippled "Verbal" Kint. But Gabriel Byrne, Kevin Pollak, Stephen Baldwin and Benicio del Toro are equally fascinating as the mismatched misfits, creating hinterlands for their characters in a single gesture. Chazz Palminteri as the special agent is our main ally in solving the puzzle, but it's really a case of the blind leading the blind. Pete Postlethwaite's bizarre accent, as the sinister legal agent Kobayashi, adds its own layer of mystery to a film that earns cult status entirely on its own merits. On the DVD: this is a dazzling two-disc set which will both please Usual Suspects aficionados and entice the uninitiated. The film itself is presented in widescreen format. The Dolby Digital surround sound quality throbs with tension so that you sense the dialogue and John Ottman's excellent, suspenseful music with your nerve endings rather than just experiencing them aurally. The original cinematic experience comes forcefully into your living room. Numerous extras include a fascinating director/screenwriter commentary (if you haven't seen the film yet, make sure this is turned off or it will wreck the suspense) and endless featurettes, each adding a layer of understanding to the film through observations from the actors, director and writer. A package that sucks you in, blows you out in pieces and still has you coming back for more, this is what special edition DVDs are all about. --Piers Ford

  • Vanity Fair [2004] Vanity Fair | DVD | (03/08/2009) from £3.33  |  Saving you £6.66 (66.70%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The corsets and high waists of the 19th century meet the lush colors and visual splendor of India in Vanity Fair, a classic novel translated into modern celluloid by Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding). The very contemporary Reese Witherspoon (Legally Blonde, Election) at first seems to hit the wrong note as Becky Sharp, an orphaned girl who rises to the heights of society using her quick wits and feminine wiles. But as Vanity Fair unfolds, the movie's tone embraces both period decor and modern attitudes, searching for a bridge that will carry us more deeply into a different time. It isn't wholly successful--the movie's end wraps things up awkwardly--but some scenes achieve a surprising and vivid immediacy, in particular one in which Becky's gambler husband (elegant James Purefoy) catalogues his worth for her before going off to the Napoleonic battlefields; love and pragmatism fuse with heartbreaking results. --Bret Fetzer, Amazon.com

  • Vikings: Season 1 [DVD] [2013] Vikings: Season 1 | DVD | (03/02/2014) from £9.00  |  Saving you £15.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Journey to a thrilling ancient world in this epic new series about history's bravest and most brutally fearsome warriors... Vikings. Ragnar a would-be Viking chieftain longs to fulfil his destiny as an explorer and conqueror alongside his ambitious brother Rollo and loyal wife Lagertha. But as Ragnar leads daring raids in distant realms across the ocean treacherous forces in his Norse homeland conspire against him. Faced with shocking betrayals and the temptations of a mysterious seductress Ragnar must wage war on the battlefield - and within himself - to protect his freedom family and life.

  • Miller's Crossing [1990] Miller's Crossing | DVD | (13/10/2003) from £4.49  |  Saving you £15.50 (77.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Arguably the best film by Joel and Ethan Coen, the 1990 Miller's Crossing stars Gabriel Byrne as Tom, a loyal lieutenant of a crime boss named Leo (Albert Finney) who is in a Prohibition-era turf war with his major rival, Johnny Caspar (Jon Polito). A man of principle, Tom nevertheless is romantically involved with Leo's lover (Marcia Gay Harden), whose screwy brother (John Turturro) escapes a hit ordered by Caspar only to become Tom's problem. Making matters worse, Tom has outstanding gambling debts he can't pay, which keeps him in regular touch with a punishing enforcer. With all the energy the Coens put into their films, and all their focused appreciation of genre conventions and rules, and all their efforts to turn their movies into ironic appreciations of archetypes in American fiction, they never got their formula so right as with Miller's Crossing. With its Hammett-like dialogue and Byzantine plot and moral chaos mitigated by one hero's personal code, the film so transcends its self-scrutiny as a retro-crime thriller that it is a deserved classic in its own right. --Tom Keogh

  • End Of Days [1999] End Of Days | DVD | (08/01/2001) from £3.99  |  Saving you £14.00 (77.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    After a two-year hiatus that included recovery from heart surgery, Arnold Schwarzenegger returned to the big screen at the end of 1999 with End of Days, a Christmas turkey if ever there was one. Overcooked and bloated with stuffing, this ludicrous thriller attached itself to the end-of-the-millennium furore. The prologue begins in 1979 with panic in the Vatican when a comet signals the birth of a child who will, 20 years later, become the chosen bride of Satan, destined to conceive the devil's spawn between 11 p.m. and midnight on December 31, 1999. It's hard to decide who has the more thankless role--Robin Tunney as Satan's would-be bride, or Schwarzenegger as Jericho Cane, the burned-out alcoholic bodyguard assigned to protect the girl from Satan, billed as "The Man" and played with cheesy menace (and an inconsistent variety of metaphysical manifestations) by Gabriel Byrne.With kitsch character names like Jericho and Chicago (Arnie's partner, played by Kevin Pollack) and lapses in logic that any five-year-old could spot, End of Days is a loud, aggravating movie that would be entertaining if it were intended as comedy. But Schwarzenegger and director Peter Hyams approach the story as an earnest tale of redemption and tested faith, delivering a ridiculous climax full of special effects and devoid of dramatic impact. You're left instead to savour the verbal and physical sparring between Satan and Jericho, resulting in the most thorough pummelling Schwarzenegger's ever endured on screen. Of course he eventually gets his payback, just in time for New Year's Eve. Perhaps he was touched by an angel? --Jeff Shannon

  • Fight Club/The Usual Suspects/Memento Fight Club/The Usual Suspects/Memento | DVD | (16/10/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Fight Club (Dir. David Fincher 1999): Jack (Edward Norton) is a chronic insomniac desperate to escape his excruciatingly boring life. That's when he meets Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) a charismatic soap salesman with a twisted philosophy. Tyler believes self-improvement is for the weak; it's self-destruction that really makes life worth living. Before long Jack and Tyler are beating each other to a pulp in a bar parking lot a cathartic slugfest that delivers joys of physical violence. Jack and Tyler form a secret Fight Club that becomes wildly successful. But there's a shocking surprise waiting for Jack that will change everything... Pitt and Norton deliver knockout performances in this stunningly original darkly comic film from David Fincher based on the controversial book by Chuck Palahniuk. The Usual Suspects (Dir. Bryan Singer 1995): Winner of two 1995 Academy Awards including Best Original Screenplay this masterful atmospheric film noir enraptured audiences with its complex and riveting storyline gritty tour-de-force performances (including an Oscar-winning turn by Kevin Spacey) and a climax that is truly deserving of the word stunning. Held in an L.A. interrogation room Verbal Kint (Spacey) attempts to convince the feds that a mythic crime lord not only exists but was also responsible for drawing him and his four partners into a multi-million dollar heist that ended with an explosion in San Pedro harbor - leaving few survivors. But as Kint lures his interrogators into the incredible story of this crime lord's almost supernatural prowess so too will you be mesmerized by a lore that is completely captivating from beginning to end! Memento (Dir. Christopher Nolan 2000): From director Christopher Nolan a unique and intriguing thriller that begins with the ultimate act of revenge and backtracks through time to reveal the shocking and provocative reasons behind it. Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) remembers everything up to the night his wife was brutally raped and murdered. But since that tragedy he has suffered from short-term memory loss and cannot recall any event the places he has just visited or anyone he has met just minutes before. Determined to find out why his wife was killed the only way he can store evidence is on scraps of paper by taking Polaroid photos and tattooing vital clues on his body. Throughout his investigation he appears to have the help of both bartender Natalie (Carrie-Anne Moss) who may have her own secret agenda and police officer Teddy (Joe Pantoliano) whose friendship is always suspect. As Shelbys fractured memory tries to piece together a chilling jigsaw of deceit and betrayal in reverse breathtaking twists and surprising turns rapidly occur in the most challenging original and critically acclaimed thriller in years.

  • Ghost Ship [2003] Ghost Ship | DVD | (21/07/2003) from £6.06  |  Saving you £7.40 (52.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    In a remote region of the Bering Sea a boat salvage crew discovers the eerie remains of a grand passenger liner thought lost for more than 40 years. Once onboard the crew must confront the ship's horrific past and face the ultimate fight for their lives.

  • Usual Suspects Usual Suspects | DVD | (06/03/2007) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Usual Suspects . MGM HOME ENTERTAINMENT

  • Spider [2002] Spider | DVD | (14/07/2008) from £6.69  |  Saving you £9.30 (58.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Based on the novel by Patrick McGrath David Cronenberg's psychological drama follows Dennis Spider Cleg (Ralph Fiennes) a mentally disturbed man who has just been released from an asylum. Upon taking up residence in a seedy London apartment building the already introverted Spider begins to retreat further into his own thoughts shutting out the caretaker Mrs. Wilkinson (Lynn Redgrave) and other eccentric tenants such as the wistful Terrence (John Neville). Within the confines of his mind the anxious Spider revisits his childhood and literally watches his younger self (Bradley Hall) as he interacts with his doting mother (Miranda Richardson) and distant father (Gabriel Byrne). As his visions of the past continue tragedy strikes and the dark history of Spider's life is slowly revealed. A surprisingly subtle outing for Cronenberg Spider carefully avoids the director's grotesque body horror aesthetic common to films such as Videodrome and The Fly. By leaving his signature bag of tricks behind Cronenberg frees himself to tell one of the most compelling stories of his career. The film is anchored by Fiennes' impressive performance as the mumbling reclusive and strangely sympathetic title character. In the hands of a less experienced and dynamic actor Spider's awkward presence could border on caricature but Fiennes imbues the self-isolated man with dignity and depth. Aiding Fiennes and Cronenberg in this minimalist masterpiece are McGrath (who has carefully pared down his hallucinatory prose) composer Howard Shore and cinematographer Peter Suschitzky along with actors Byrne Hall Redgrave Neville and most notably Richardson in a remarkable triple role.

  • The Man In The Iron Mask [1998] The Man In The Iron Mask | DVD | (01/02/2000) from £3.99  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Footnotes in film books are likely to reduce this swashbuckling adventure down to a simple description: it was the first movie to star Leonardo DiCaprio after the phenomenal success of Titanic. As such, The Man in the Iron Mask automatically attracted a box-office stampede of Leo's young female fans, but critical reaction was deservedly mixed. Having earned his directorial debut after writing the Oscar-winning script for Mel Gibson's Braveheart, Randall Wallace wrote and directed this ambitious version of the often-filmed classic novel by Alexandre Dumas. DiCaprio plays dual roles as the despotic King Louis XIV, who rules France with an iron fist, and the king's twin brother, Philippe, who languishes in prison under an iron mask, his identity concealed to prevent an overthrow of Louis' throne. But Louis' abuse of power ultimately enrages Athos (John Malkovich), one of the original Four Musketeers, who recruits his former partners (Gabriel Byrne, Gérard Depardieu, and Jeremy Irons) in a plot to liberate Philippe and install him as the king's identical replacement. Once this plot is set in motion and the Musketeers are each given moments in the spotlight, the film kicks into gear and offers plenty of entertainment in the grand style of vintage swashbucklers. But it's also sidetracked by excessive length and disposable subplots, and for all his post-Titanic star power, the boyish DiCaprio just isn't yet "man" enough to be fully convincing in his title role. Still, this is an entertaining film, no less enjoyable for falling short of the greatness to which it aspired. --Jeff Shannon

  • The End Of Violence [1997] The End Of Violence | DVD | (25/02/2008) from £7.99  |  Saving you £1.82 (11.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Mike Max (Bill Pullman) is a hollywood producer who has become rich and powerful thanks to brutal and bloody action films but cuts himself off from his home life and neglected wife (Andie MacDowell) by the banks of phones and computers he uses to remain in contact with his business associates. Suddenly Mike is kidnapped by two bandits but escapes and hides out with his mexican gardener's family. In order to track him down the police call in a scientist (Gabriel Byrne) who is forced to use an orwellian surveillance system that enables government agents to assassinate their enemies at will.

  • In Treatment Season 1 [DVD] [2008] In Treatment Season 1 | DVD | (01/02/2010) from £12.89  |  Saving you £2.61 (16.80%)  |  RRP £15.5

    In Treatment is set within the psychotherapy sessions of five patients. Featuring Paul (Gabriel Byrne) a therapist who exhibits great insight and confidence when treating his patients but crippling insecurities while counselled by his own therapist Gina (Dianne West). Adding to his list of growing concerns his wife Kate (Michelle Forbes) is overcome with feelings of neglect and resents competing for his attention. Patients undergoing treatment with Paul include a young Doctor (Melissa George) who has fallen in love with Paul a Navy pilot (Blair Underwood) re-evaluating his life after a failed mission in Iraq a teenage gymnast (Mia Wasikowska) with suicidal tendencies and a passionate couple (Josh Charles and Embeth Davidtz) who are trouble in all other areas of their lives.

  • Stigmata (1999) Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) Stigmata (1999) Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) | Blu Ray | (17/10/2016) from £8.85  |  Saving you £9.14 (50.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Gabriel Byrne plays Father Kiernan, a young Jesuit priest whose degree in chemistry makes him a sort of priest/detective as he investigates weeping Marys and the like around the world. Meanwhile, Frankie (Patricia Arquette), a rave-generation Pittsburgher, is afflicted with the stigmata--holes that appear in her wrists, resembling the wounds of Christ. The young woman's symptoms filter back to the Vatican and Father Kiernan is assigned to the case. The priest is puzzled by Frankie's atheism; usually the stigmata only appear on the devout (hence the age-old controversy of miracles vs. hysteria). Other manifestations appear on Frankie, and the priest's cardinal (Jonathan Pryce) is brought in, leading to political manoeuvring within the Church hierarchy. The film owes a large and obvious debt to The Exorcist (at one point, Frankie's bed scoots across the room and she levitates into a crucifix position) but to term it an Exorcist rip-off would be to short-change Stigmata. The premise and screenplay are more cerebral than in the l973 film, and the source of the phenomenon is coming from a completely different place. Unfortunately, amid Stigmata's high-octane editing and slick technique, the chills of The Exorcist aren't there, giving the movie a sort of identity crisis: horror movie or intellectual thriller? Several elements of the film challenge basic tenets of the Catholic faith, hence the brief furore that erupted at the time of the film's release; if nothing else, the internal workings of the Church are shown in a very unflattering light indeed. Byrne excels as the sceptical priest, as does Arquette as the tortured young woman. All told, Stigmata is a rather uneven effort but one with a thought-provoking combination of theology and thrills served up in a thoroughly modern, stylish package. Fans of TV's Ally McBeal will recognise Portia De Rossi in a supporting role. --Jerry Renshaw

  • The Usual Suspects [Blu-ray] [1995] [Region B] The Usual Suspects | Blu Ray | (09/04/2007) from £5.89  |  Saving you £14.10 (70.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Stephen Baldwin, Gabriel Byrne, Benicio Del Toro, Kevin Pollak, Kevin Spacey, Chazz Palminteri, Pete PostlethwaiteDirector: Bryan Singer

  • Gothic [1986] Gothic | DVD | (20/06/2005) from £6.55  |  Saving you £9.44 (59.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A richly detailed delightfully chilling horror tale centering around the romanticism's poetic elite. When Lord Byron Percy and Mary Shelley and other assorted artistic guests gather at a secluded mansion they enjoy a frightfully scary drug-induced evening that ultimately inspires the writing of both Mary Shelley's ""Frankenstein"" and Polidori's ""The Vampyre.""

  • The Brylcreem Boys [1997] The Brylcreem Boys | DVD | (05/03/2007) from £4.59  |  Saving you £5.40 (54.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    When two enemy pilots shoot each other down over Ireland they are both captured as prisoners of war. During World War II Neutral Ireland interned all soldiers sailors and airmen regardless of their nationality captured on Irish soil. What they failed to mention was that they would put them all in the same camp... Our pilots (Bill Campbell) and Rudi (Angus MacFayden) are astonished to come face to face with each other at the entrance of the interment camp. Further surprises are in

  • Carrie Pilby [DVD] Carrie Pilby | DVD | (08/05/2017) from £4.35  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A person of high intelligence struggles to make sense of the world as it relates to morality, relationships, sex and leaving her apartment.

  • Spider [2003] Spider | DVD | (14/07/2003) from £4.95  |  Saving you £6.36 (45.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Internal madness is hypnotically externalized in David Cronenberg's Spider, a disturbing portrait of schizophrenia. Adapted by Patrick McGrath from his celebrated novel, this no-frills production begins when "Spider" Cleg (Ralph Fiennes, in a daring, nearly nonverbal role) returns to his childhood neighbourhood in London's dreary East End, where a traumatic event from his past percolates to the surface of his still-erratic consciousness. Released from a mental institution and left to fend for himself, he pursues elusive memories while staying in a halfway house run by a stern matron (Lynn Redgrave), unable to distinguish between past, present, and psychological fabrication. The distorting influence of Spider's mind is directly reflected in Cronenberg's cunning visual strategy, presenting a shifting "reality" that's deliberately untrustworthy, until the veracity of nearly every scene is called into question. With an impressive dual-role performance by Miranda Richardson, Spider falls prey to its own lugubrious rhythms, but like the acclaimed 1995 indie film Clean, Shaven, it's a compelling glimpse of mental illness, seen from the inside out. --Jeff Shannon

  • Assault On Precinct 13 [2005] Assault On Precinct 13 | DVD | (27/06/2005) from £3.09  |  Saving you £16.90 (84.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Action buffs will have a fine time with the spray of bullets, shattering glass, and pyrotechnic silliness that makes up the bulk of Assault on Precinct 13. Updated from the little-known cops-and-robbers classic John Carpenter made in 1976 (two years before he made his name with Halloween), this high-concept thriller is mostly a lowbrow kill-fest, and is very happy with itself for being so efficient in both categories. A decrepit police station on its last night before retirement--New Year's Eve, no less--plays unexpected home to a gang of criminals who become snowbound in the basement lockup. Another mysterious gang of people who stealthily gather in the blizzard outside want one of the particularly nasty criminals (Laurence Fishburne) dead, and they'll take the rest of the precinct down too, by golly. The odd lot of characters trapped inside include a burned-out sergeant (Ethan Hawke), a sexpot secretary (post-Sopranos Drea de Matteo), an even sexier police psychologist (Maria Bello), and various other good guys and bad guys who variously go down in blazes of guts, glory, bullets, and fire. Hawke and Fishburne are opposite sides of the coin: the law, and the bathroom scale. Their need to partner in order to survive the guns outside is the movie's moral conflict, and both actors chew on Precinct 13's peeling walls and scuffed floors to drive the point home every chance they get. Obvious filmmaking fakery abounds in everything from the irksome snowstorm, frequent gunshots to the head, and a shadowy forest that conveniently presents itself in an industrial section of Detroit for the climactic showdown. No matter, this Assault is for non-thinkers who want blood and gunpowder, with no messy slowdowns for logic, please.--Ted Fry

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