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Grace Kelly

  • Dial M for Murder Dial M for Murder | DVD | (01/11/2004) from £4.75  |  Saving you £3.24 (40.60%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Classic Hitchcock movie starring Grace Kelly & Ray Milland. Ex-tennis pro Tony Wendice decides to murder his wife for her money and because she had an affair the year before. He blackmails an old college associate to strangle her, but when things go wrong he sees a way to turn events to his advantage.

  • To Catch a Thief [DVD] [1955] To Catch a Thief | DVD | (14/01/2013) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The French Riviera… two luminous stars (Grace Kelly, Cary Grant)… and the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, behind the camera. They all add up to one romantic, dazzling screen thriller. Grant plays John Robie, a retired jewel thief once known as 'The Cat', who catches the eye of Frances Stevens (Kelly), a pampered, vacationing heiress. But when a new rash of gem thefts occurs amongst the luxury hotels of the spectacular French playground, it appears that 'The Cat' is on the prowl once again. Is Robie truly reformed? Or is he deviously using Frances to gain access to the tempting collection of fabulous jewellery belonging to her mother (Jessie Royce Landis)? Romantic sparks fly as the suspense builds in this glittering Hitchcock classic that nabbed an Oscar for Best Cinematography. Special Features: Commentary by Peter Bogdanovich and Laurent Bouzereau Featurettes: 1.) Writing and Casting To Catch A Thief 2.) The Making Of To Catch A Thief 3.) Alfred Hitchcock and To Catch A Thief: An Appreciation 4.) Edith Head- The Paramount Years Featurette Theatrical Trailer

  • Rear Window [1954] Rear Window | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £4.19  |  Saving you £7.80 (65.10%)  |  RRP £11.99

    Like the Greenwich Village courtyard view from its titular portal, Alfred Hitchcock's classic Rear Window is both confined and multileveled: its story and visual perspective are dictated by its protagonist's imprisonment in his apartment, convalescing in a wheelchair, from which both he and the audience observe the lives of his neighbours. Cheerful voyeurism, as well as the behaviour glimpsed among the various tenants, affords a droll comic atmosphere that gradually darkens when he sees clues to what may be a murder. Photographer LB "Jeff" Jeffries (James Stewart) is, in fact, a voyeur by trade, a professional photographer sidelined by an accident while on assignment. His immersion in the human drama (and comedy) visible from his window is a by-product of boredom, underlined by the disapproval of his girlfriend, Lisa (Grace Kelly), and a wisecracking visiting nurse (Thelma Ritter). Yet when the invalid wife of Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr) disappears, Jeff enlists the two women to help him to determine whether she's really left town, as Thorwald insists, or been murdered. Hitchcock scholar Donald Spoto convincingly argues that the crime at the centre of this mystery is the MacGuffin--a mere pretext--in a film that's more interested in the implications of Jeff's sentinel perspective. We actually learn more about the lives of the other neighbours (given generic names by Jeff, even as he's drawn into their lives) he, and we, watch undetected than we do the putative murderer and his victim. Jeff's evident fear of intimacy and commitment with the elegant, adoring Lisa provides the other vital thread to the script, one woven not only into the couple's own relationship, but reflected and even commented upon through the various neighbours' lives. At a minimum, Hitchcock's skill at making us accomplices to Jeff's spying, coupled with an ingenious escalation of suspense as the teasingly vague evidence coalesces into ominous proof, deliver a superb thriller spiked with droll humour, right up to its nail-biting, nightmarish climax. At deeper levels, however, Rear Window plumbs issues of moral responsibility and emotional honesty, while offering further proof (were any needed) of the director's brilliance as a visual storyteller. -- Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com

  • High Society [1956] High Society | DVD | (26/05/2003) from £5.45  |  Saving you £8.54 (61.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    MGM's bold idea to remake George Cukor's Oscar-winning upper-class romantic farce, The Philadelphia Story, into a star-studded technicolor musical with Cole Porter tunes somehow works splendidly and remains an underrated gem. Even the plot and character names--and some bits of dialogue--all remain the same as the original. Crooning Bing Crosby replaces Cary Grant as the wealthy ex-husband trying to win back his soon-to-be-remarried ex-wife, spoiled ice queen Tracy Lord (Grace Kelly, stunning and aloof in her last film role, originated in the earlier comedy by Katherine Hepburn). Unlike Grant, however, Crosby has jazz great Louis Armstrong, playing himself, in his corner for quixotic persuasion. Frank Sinatra (cocky in James Stewart's former role) and Celeste Holm add support as the nosy reporters covering, and subsequently complicating, the upcoming wedding. Sure, High Society lacks the original's witty satire, sarcasm and character complexity; but it's assuredly paced and wonderfully acted, and contains enough romantic chemistry to keep the plot engaging. And then there's the music. Unlike the grandiose production numbers of many 40s and 50s musicals, High Society's musical sequences are considerably low-key and intimate, focusing on Porter's lyrical content and the style in which it's delivered by the charismatic performers. Armstrong kicks the film off in telling style: he sings the title track, a calypso tune outlining the plot like a Greek chorus--not as an elaborately choreographed song-and-dance number, but instead stuffed claustrophobically in the back of a limousine with his jazz band. Other musical standouts include Sinatra and Crosby playfully tossing barbs during "Well, Did You Evah?"; Crosby and Armstrong teaming up for an energetic clash of styles in "Now You Has Jazz"; the two soaring, archetypal ballads by the leads--Crosby's "I Love You, Samantha" and Sinatra's superior "You're Sensational"; and, finally, the satirical Sinatra/Holm duet, "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?", the closest High Society ever comes to social or class-commentary. --Dave McCoy, Amazon.com

  • Alfred Hitchcock - Essential Collection [DVD] Alfred Hitchcock - Essential Collection | DVD | (05/09/2011) from £11.29  |  Saving you £38.70 (77.40%)  |  RRP £49.99

    Titles Comprise:Rear Window: When professional photographer J.B. Jeff Jeffries (James Stewart) is confined to a wheelchair with a broken leg, he becomes obsessed with watching the private dramas of his neighbours play out across the courtyard. When he suspects a salesman may have murdered his nagging wife, Jeffries enlists the help of his glamorous socialite girlfriend (Grace Kelly) to investigate the highly suspicious chain of events that lead to one of the most memorable and gripping endings in all of film history.The Birds: As beautiful blonde Melanie Daniels ('Tippi' Hedren) rolls into Bodega Bay in pursuit of eligible bachelor Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor), she is inexplicably attacked by a seagull. Suddenly thousands of birds areflocking into town, preying on school-children and residents in a terrifying series of attacks. Soon Mitch and Melanie are fighting for their lives against a deadly force that can't be explained and can't be stopped in one of Hollywood's most horrific films of nature gone berserk.Vertigo: Set in San Francisco, James Stewart portrays an acrophobic detective hired to trail a friend's suicidal wife (Kim Novak). After he successfully rescues her from a leap into the bay, he finds himself becoming obsessed with the beautifully troubled woman. One of cinema's most chilling romantic endeavours - this film is a must for collectors.Psycho: Anthony Perkins stars in Alfred Hitchcock's landmark masterpiece as the troubled Norman Bates whose old dark house and adjoining motel are not the place to spend a quiet evening. Janet Leigh plays Marion Crane, the ill-fated traveller whose journey ends in the notorious shower scene. Horror and suspense mount to a terrifying climax where the mysterious killer is finally revealed after both Marion's sister and a private detective search for her.

  • Rear Window [Blu-ray] [1954][Region Free] Rear Window | Blu Ray | (13/05/2013) from £10.63  |  Saving you £2.99 (19.90%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Alfred Hitchcock playfully explores the role of the voyeur in one of his best-loved suspense thrillers. After breaking his leg during a shoot, photo-journalist L.B. 'Jeff' Jeffries (James Stewart) is forced to spend a humid summer recuperating in his Greenwich Village apartment. The wheelchair-bound Jeff whiles away his time observing his neighbours through a telephoto lens, bestowing them with nicknames and growing familiar with their daily routines. However, his society girlfriend Lisa (Grace Kelly) is exasperated and then alarmed when Jeff becomes obsessed with the notion that Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr), who lives in the apartment opposite, has murdered his wife. A 53-minute making of feature, 'Rear Window Ethics', is also included. Special Features: Rear Window Ethics: An Original Documentary A Conversation with Screenwriter John Michael Hayes Pure Cinema: Through the Eyes of The Master Breaking Barriers: The Sound of Hitchcock Rear Window Re-Release Trailer Narrated by James Stewart Feature Commentary with John Fawell Author of Hitchcock's Rear Window

  • Dial M for Murder (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray) [1954][Region Free] Dial M for Murder (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (26/11/2012) from £14.39  |  Saving you £10.60 (42.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Originally shot in 3D and newly remastered and restored for Blu-ray 3D, Alfred Hitchcock's screen version of Frederick Knott's stage hit Dial M for Murder is a tasty blend of elegance and suspense casting Grace Kelly, Ray Milland and Robert Cummings as the points of a romantic triangle. Kelly won the New York Film Critics and National Board of Review Best Actress Awards for this and two other acclaimed 1954 performances (Hitchcock's Rear Window and her Oscar-honoured work in The Country Girl). She loves Cummings; her husband Milland plots her murder. But when he dials a Mayfair exchange to set the plot in motion, his right number gets the wrong answer -and gleaming scissors become a deadly weapon. Dial 'M' for the Master of Suspense at his most stylish.

  • Rear Window [1954] Rear Window | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £2.49  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    None of Hitchcock's films has ever given a clearer view of his genius for suspense than Rear Window. When professional photographer J.B. ""Jeff"" Jeffries (James Stewart) is confined to a wheelchair with a broken leg he becomes obsessed with watching the private dramas of his neighbours play out across the courtyard. When he suspects a salesman may have murdered his nagging wife Jeffries enlists the help of his glamorous socialite girlfriend (Grace Kelly) to investigate the highly suspicious chain of events... Events that ultimately lead to one of the most memorable and gripping endings in all of film history.

  • High Noon [1952] High Noon | DVD | (13/10/2008) from £7.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (20.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The story of a man who was too proud to run. On the day Lawman Will Kane trades in his tin star for his beautiful bride news arrives that a killer he helped send to jail is returning on the noon train to seek revenge. At the behest of his friends and concerned for his new bride's safety they quickly leave town to avoid a confrontation. But Cooper realises they'll never run far enough away and heads back to town to face the killer. But when Kane tries to drum up support one by one the townspeople he had protected turn their backs on him... until Kane stands alone to face four killers on the deserted streets of town in one of the most famous showdowns ever!

  • Musicals Musicals | DVD | (18/09/2006) from £9.95  |  Saving you £7.25 (40.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Wizard of Oz: We click our heels in anticipation. There's no place like home and no movie like this one. From generation to generation The Wizard Of Oz brings us together - kids grown-ups families friends. The dazzling land of Oz a dream-come--true world of enchanted forests dancing scarecrows and singing lions wraps us in its magic with one great song-filled adventure after another. Based on L. Frank Baum's treasured book series The Wizard Of Oz was judged the best family film of all time by American Film Institute. And this never-before-seen restoration looks and sounds better than ever. We invite you to embark for the Emerald City on the most famous road in movie history. Dorothy (Judy Garland) Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) Tin Woodman (Jack Haley) and Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr) await you on the Yellow Brick Road and ""Over the Rainbow."" Singin' in the Rain: Starring Gene Kelly Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds and featuring unforgettable song and dance classics like 'Singin' in the Rain' 'Make 'Em Laugh' and 'All I Do Is Dream of You' it has ""just about everything you could ask for in a movie musical"" Sunday Review. Set in Hollywood in the roaring 20s co-starring Jean Hagen and the incomparable Cyd Charisse and featuring a spectacular 12-minute 'Broadway Ballet' finale it is indisputably ""the most enjoyable of all American movie musicals"" Pauline Kael. The programme now contains a previously-deleted sequence featuring Debbie Reynolds in the never-seen-before footage of 'You Are My Lucky Star'. High Society: Beautiful aloof Newport heiress Tracy Lord (Kelly) is about to marry bland businessman George Kittredge (John Lund) but matters become complicated when her ex-husband C K Dexter-Haven (Crosby) moves to her neighbourhood determined to win back her hand. Things go from bad to worse for Tracy when journalist Mike Connor (Sinatra) arrives to cover the wedding for Spy Magazine. When Tracy is forced to choose between her suitors will she realise that ""safe"" doesn't always mean the best bet?

  • Rear Window - 60th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1954] [Region Free] Rear Window - 60th Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (04/08/2014) from £9.49  |  Saving you £8.50 (47.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Like the Greenwich Village courtyard view from its titular portal, Alfred Hitchcock's classic Rear Window is both confined and multileveled: both its story and visual perspective are dictated by its protagonist's imprisonment in his apartment, convalescing in a wheelchair, from which both he and the audience observe the lives of his neighbors. Cheerful voyeurism, as well as the behavior glimpsed among the various tenants, affords a droll comic atmosphere that gradually darkens when he sees clues to what may be a murder. Photographer L.B. "Jeff" Jeffries (James Stewart) is, in fact, a voyeur by trade, a professional photographer sidelined by an accident while on assignment. His immersion in the human drama (and comedy) visible from his window is a by-product of boredom, underlined by the disapproval of his girlfriend, Lisa (Grace Kelly), and a wisecracking visiting nurse (Thelma Ritter). Yet when the invalid wife of Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr) disappears, Jeff enlists the two women to help him to determine whether she's really left town, as Thorwald insists, or been murdered. Hitchcock scholar Donald Spoto convincingly argues that the crime at the center of this mystery is the MacGuffin--a mere pretext--in a film that's more interested in the implications of Jeff's sentinel perspective. We actually learn more about the lives of the other neighbors (given generic names by Jeff, even as he's drawn into their lives) he, and we, watch undetected than we do the putative murderer and his victim. Jeff's evident fear of intimacy and commitment with the elegant, adoring Lisa provides the other vital thread to the script, one woven not only into the couple's own relationship, but reflected and even commented upon through the various neighbours' lives. At minimum, Hitchcock's skill at making us accomplices to Jeff's spying, coupled with an ingenious escalation of suspense as the teasingly vague evidence coalesces into ominous proof, deliver a superb thriller spiked with droll humour, right up to its nail-biting, nightmarish climax. At deeper levels, however, Rear Window plumbs issues of moral responsibility and emotional honesty, while offering further proof (were any needed) of the director's brilliance as a visual storyteller. --Sam Sutherland

  • To Catch A Thief [Blu-ray] [1955][Region Free] To Catch A Thief | Blu Ray | (24/09/2012) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The French Riviera... two luminous stars (Grace Kelly, Cary Grant)... and the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, behind the camera. They all add up to one romantic, dazzling screen thriller in this first time on Blu-ray edition. Grant plays John Robie, a retired jewel thief once known as The Cat, who catches the eye of Frances Stevens (Kelly), a pampered, vacationing heiress. But when a new rash of gem thefts occurs amongst the luxury hotels of the spectacular French playground, it appears that The Cat is on the prowl once again. Is Robie truly reformed? Or is he deviously using Frances to gain access to the tempting collection of fabulous jewelry belonging to her mother (Jessie Royce Landis)? Romantic sparks fly as the suspense builds in this glittering Hitchcock classic that nabbed an Oscar for Best Cinematography.

  • To Catch A Thief [1955] To Catch A Thief | DVD | (13/01/2003) from £3.44  |  Saving you £4.04 (31.10%)  |  RRP £12.99

    To Catch a Thief is not one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest, but it's arguably his most stylish thriller, loved as much for the elegantly erotic banter between Grace Kelly and Cary Grant as for the suspense that ensues when retired burglar Grant attempts to net the copycat diamond thief. The action, much of it shot on location, hugs the coast of the French Riviera; John Michael Hayes' screenplay crackles with doubles entendres; and Edith Head's dresses define the aloof poise of one of cinema's more enigmatic icons. If anything is missing, it's the undertow of black humour which snags the unsuspecting viewer in so many of Hitchcock's greater films. Here, the edge is supplied by the splendid Jessie Royce Landis as Kelly's vulgar, worldly mother; her special way with a fried egg is one of those cinematic moments which linger in the mind with almost pornographic disgust. History, of course, delivered its own ironic blow years later when the then Princess Grace of Monaco died in an accident on the very road where Kelly and Grant shot their exhilarating car chase. Portents aside, she remains Hitchcock's most alluring and sophisticated heroine. On the DVD: To Catch a Thief is presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen, which distils the distinctive qualities of the VistaVision cinematography, and with a mono Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack. Interesting extras include several mini-documentaries in which Hitchcock's daughter and granddaughter, among others, reminisce about the great director, censor problems over the risqué dialogue, the talents of costume designer Edith Head, and the peculiar difficulties of shooting in VistaVision. An original theatrical trailer is another bonus. --Piers Ford

  • To Catch A Thief [1955] To Catch A Thief | DVD | (07/05/2007) from £3.65  |  Saving you £6.00 (60.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A supposedly reformed cat burglar out to prove himself innocent of a recent crime spree tries to capture the thief who's terrifying the French Riviera. Cary Grant is devastatingly elegant as the reformed thief John Robie and charming enough to attract the attention of the lovely Frances Stevens (Grace Kelly) a wealthy and spoiled American traveling the Riviera with her widowed mother (Jessie Royce Landis). However things do not begin on a romantic note. Robie is more interested in clearing his name than in pursuing the beautiful American but the two will not go their separate ways so easily. Classic suspence and romance from director Alfred Hitchcock.

  • The Bridges At Toko-Ri [1954] The Bridges At Toko-Ri | DVD | (13/10/2003) from £5.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (62.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A powerful study of courage in the face of irrational odds, The Bridges at Toko-Ri (based on James Michener's novel) is no less patriotic than many other war films, but it dispenses with the gung-ho bluster to focus on the very real and tragic consequences of war. This is also one of the first films to openly criticise the morality of the Korean War while praising the honour and integrity of the men who fought it. Lt Harry Brubaker (William Holden) is one of those men: a lawyer with a loving wife (Grace Kelly) and two young daughters, who is recalled to duty from the Navy Reserve, his mission; to fly with a bomber jet squadron over one of the Communists' most heavily protected targets, the strategically vital bridges in the Korean canyon of Toko-Ri. Brubaker has his own noble protection from his fellow pilots (including Charles McGraw in a fine supporting role), admiring admiral (Frederic March), and from the helicopter scouts (Mickey Rooney, Earl Holliman) who saved his life on a previous missions. But his ambivalence--and his fear that the Toko-Ri mission will be his last--is what gives the film its potent emotional impact. Holden is perfect in his role, and director Mark Robson steadfastly avoids any false sentiment or macho theatrics that would diminish the film's devastating climax. The Bridges at Toko-Ri is also a superlative showcase for the naval operations; the aerial sequences earned an Oscar for special effects and the Navy's cooperation assures total authenticity in the "flat-top" aircraft carrier scenes. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Hitchcock Vol. 1 [Blu-ray] [Region Free] Hitchcock Vol. 1 | Blu Ray | (23/09/2013) from £16.20  |  Saving you £33.79 (67.60%)  |  RRP £49.99

    The Volume 1 of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films including Psycho (1960) Rope Saboteur Rear Window Shadow of a Doubt The Trouble with Harry and The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956). Saboteur (1942)Aircraft factory worker Barry Kane goes on the run across the United States when he is wrongly accused of a fire that killed his best friend. Special Features: Saboteur: A Closer Look Storyboards: The Statue of Liberty Sequence Alfred Hitchcock's Sketches Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer Shadow of a Doubt (1943)A young woman discovers her visiting Uncle Charlie may not be the man he initially seemed to be. Special Features: Beyond Doubt: The Making of Hitchcock's Favorite Film Production Drawings by Art Director Robert Boyle Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer Rope (1948)Two young men strangle their classmate hide his body in their apartment and invite his closest friends and family to a dinner party as a means to challenge the perfection of their crime. Special Features: Rope Unleashed Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer Rear Window (1954)A wheelchair bound photographer spies on his neighbours from his window and becomes convinced one of them has committed a serious murder. Special Features: Rear Window Ethics: An Original Documentary A Conversation with Screenwriter John Michael Hayes Pure Cinema: Through the Eyes of The Master Breaking Barriers: The Sound of Hitchcock Hitchcock-Truffaut Interview Excerpts Masters of Cinema Feature Commentary with John Fawell author of Hitchcock's Rear Window: The Well-Made Film Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer Re-Release Trailer Narrated by James Stewart The Trouble with Harry (1955)The trouble with Harry is that everyone seems to have a different idea of what needs to be done with his body. Special Features: The Trouble with Harry Isn't Over Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)A family holidaying in Morocco stumble on to an assassination plot and the conspirators are determined to prevent them from interfering. Special Features: The Making of The Man Who Knew Too Much Production Photographs Trailers Psycho (1960)A young woman steals $40 000 from her client and subsequently encounters a young motel proprietor who has been too long under the presence and domination of his mother. Special Features: The Making of Psycho Psycho Sound In The Master's Shadow: Hitchcock's Legacy Hitchcock-Truffaut Interview Excerpts Newsreel Footage: The Release of Psycho The Shower Scene: With and Without Music The Shower Scene: Storyboards by Saul Bass The Psycho Archives Posters and Psycho Ads Lobby Cards Behind-the-Scenes Photographs Production Photographs Theatrical Trailer Re-release Trailers Feature Commentary with Stephen Rebello (author of Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho)

  • Place In The Sun, A / Roman Holiday / To Catch A Thief Place In The Sun, A / Roman Holiday / To Catch A Thief | DVD | (10/10/2005) from £4.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A Place In The Sun (Dir. George Stevens 1951): George Stevens' stunning adaptation of Theodore Dreiser's 'An American Tragedy' garnered six Academy Awards (including Best Director and Best Screenplay) and guaranteed immortality for screen lovers Montgomery Clift and Elizabeth Taylor. Clift stars as George Eastman a poor young man determined to win a place in respectable society and the heart of a beautiful socialite (Elizabeth Taylor). Shelley Winters plays the factory gir

  • Hitchcock DVD Collection Hitchcock DVD Collection | DVD | (08/11/2004) from £24.84  |  Saving you £37.15 (59.90%)  |  RRP £61.99

    The incomparable Alfred Hitchcock presents a collection of his finest suspenseful thrillers! Includes: 1. Strangers On A Train (1951) 2. Stage Fright (1950) 3. I Confess (1953) 4. Dial M For Murder (1954) 5. The Wrong Man (1956) 6. North By Northwest (1959)

  • High Noon [1952] High Noon | DVD | (15/01/2001) from £9.49  |  Saving you £-7.81 (-78.20%)  |  RRP £9.99

    One of the greatest Westerns ever made gets the deluxe treatment on this superior disc. Written by Carl Foreman (who was later blacklisted during the anticommunist hearings of the 1950s) and superbly directed by Fred Zinnemann, this 1952 classic stars Gary Cooper as just-married lawman Will Kane, who is about to retire as a small-town sheriff and begin a new life with his bride (Grace Kelly) when he learns that gunslinger Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) is due to arrive at high noon to settle an old score. Kane seeks assistance from deputies and townsfolk, but soon realises he will have to stand alone in his showdown with Miller and his henchmen. Innovative for its time, the suspenseful story unfolds in approximate real time (from 10:40 a.m. to high noon in an 84-minute film), and many interpreted Foreman's drama as an allegorical reflection of apathy and passive acceptance of Senator Joseph McCarthy's anticommunist campaign. Political underpinnings aside, this remains a milestone of its genre (often referred to as the first "adult" Western), and Cooper is flawless in his Oscar-winning role. The first-rate DVD gives this landmark film all the respect it deserves, beginning with a digitally remastered transfer from the original film negative. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Mogambo [1954] Mogambo | DVD | (28/06/2013) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Big game trapper Victor Marswell (Gable) has his hands full when the feisty Eloise Kelly (Ava Gardner) and a couple on safari descend on his company in Kenya...

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