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Julie Christie: List of Movies, Films and TV Shows

  • Far From the Madding Crowd [DVD] [1967] Far From the Madding Crowd | DVD | (01/06/2015) from £8.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Headstrong and passionate Bathsheba Everdene (Julie Christie) unexpectedly inherits a large farm in rural Dorset. Struggling to manage the farm herself, she captivates the hearts and minds of three very different men: an honest and hardworking sheep farmer (Alan Bates), a wealthy but tortured landowner (Peter Finch), and a reckless and violent swordsman (Terence Stamp). But as emotions become entangled, free spirited and innocent folly soon leads to devastating tragedy. The restoration process of Far From the Madding Crowd was overseen by the film's cinematographer and acclaimed director, Nicolas Roeg. The Digital Film restoration was funded by STUDIOCANAL in collaboration the BFI's Unlocking Film Heritage programme, Awarding funds from the National Lottery. Extras: New Interview with Terence Stamp New Interview with Frederic Raphael New Interview with Nic Roeg New featurette Devizes, then and now Original Location featurette

  • Miracle Maker [2000] Miracle Maker | DVD | (01/10/2007) from £5.79  |  Saving you £7.20 (55.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    It's A Story That Has Been Told For The Last 2000 Years. But Never Like This... Brought to you in state-of-the-art 3D animation The Miracle Maker offers rich detail and brilliant realism to this powerful adventure. The voices of an all-star cast bring an inspiring perspective to the greatest story ever told - the life of Jesus Christ. A family is seeking help for their daughter when they cross paths with an extraordinary carpenter named Jesus who is walking the coun

  • Doctor Zhivago [1965] Doctor Zhivago | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.49  |  Saving you £8.50 (60.80%)  |  RRP £13.99

    David Lean's wintry adaptation of Boris Pasternak's melodramatic Russian Revolution romance, Doctor Zhivago, is a masterpiece of epic filmmaking, but one that risks leaving the viewer cold. Though none of the film was shot in the then USSR, Lean's assured technique nevertheless illuminates the breathtaking backgrounds magnificently: from the snowy wastes of the Urals to the strife-torn streets of Moscow, Lean stages a series of wonderful set-pieces showing war, revolution and its terrible aftermath. The problem lies in the foreground. Omar Sharif's entirely passive Zhivago is, we are told, a romantic poet of great sensitivity who internalises all his emotions and expresses them in verse. The trouble is the audience never gets to see a line of his poems, not even the centrally important "Lara" cycle. Thus Zhivago at the end of the picture is as much an emotional blank to us as he was at the beginning. His affair with the idealised beauty that is Julie Christie's Lara is also taken for granted by the filmmakers rather than set up in any convincing way, their mutual attraction remaining a mystery that creates a vacuum at the core of the picture. Given that none of the central characters with the exception of Rod Steiger's fire-breathing lecher Komarovsky ever give way to strong emotions, the romantic heart of the film remains oddly frigid. Matters are not helped by composer Maurice Jarre's incessant "Lara's Theme", which many will find teeth-grindingly irritating. Still, any David Lean epic, even a flawed one, is always going to be a first-class cinematic experience, and Zhivago is assuredly that. On the DVD: A stunning anamorphic widescreen print is the ideal way to appreciate David Lean's craftsmanship and this movie's glorious, wintry cinematography. Maurice Jarre's "Lara's Theme" and the rest of his patchwork score can be heard in a music-only track, while Omar Sharif is joined by Lean's widow Sandra and Rod Steiger for an intermittent commentary. The second bonus disc contains a good hour-long making-of documentary plus 10 shorter contemporary documentaries giving various insights into the location shooting and the cast and crew. But it's the sheer beauty of the picture that will astonish and make this disc forever treasurable. --Mark Walker

  • Glorious 39 [DVD] [2009] Glorious 39 | DVD | (29/03/2010) from £3.99  |  Saving you £14.00 (77.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    This tense psychological thriller is set betweet present day London and the idyllic British countryside around the outbreak of the Second World War. Anne a budding young actress stumbles across secret recordings of a sinister Nazi appeasement plot that will stop at nothing to achieve its aims. As close friends die in suspicious circumstances she finds herself in extreme danger and finds out how badly she has been betrayed.

  • Masters Of The Cinema Masters Of The Cinema | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £5.45  |  Saving you £-0.06 (-0.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Titles Comprise: Ben Hur: Having swept the board at the Academy awards Ben Hur achieved an outstanding feat in film history winning eleven oscars in 1959 including Best Picture Best Actor and Best Director. After a ten month production schedule and a then massive million budget this 1950''s epic movie has always represented a cinematographic feat that has rarely been bettered. Doctor Zhivago: Omar Sharif stars in the title role of Doctor Zhivago portraying the surgeon-poet over a half-century period. Zhivago who is married to Tonya (Geraldine Chaplin) an aristocratic girl with whom he raises a family is also in love with Lara (Julie Christie) a nurse whose life has been destroyed by tragedy. Repeatedly brought together and separated from each woman by war and revolution Zhivago is torn apart by conflict. He loves Tonya deeply but his poetic soul belongs to Lara. Much like his beloved country Zhivago's spirit becomes battered by the devastation of war as he struggles to maintain his individualism in the face of overwhelming odds. Gone With The Wind: David O. Selznick's production of Margaret Mitchell's Pulitzer Prize winner Gone With The Wind is the pinnacle of Hollywood moviemaking ( Leonard Maltin of Entertainment Tonight) . And in Maltin's view it looks better than it has in years. This sweeping Civil War-era romance won an impressive 10 Academy Awards (including Best Picture) and its immortal characters Scarlett (Vivian Leigh) Rhett (Clark Gable) Ashley (Leslie Howard) Melanie (Olivia de Havilland) Mammy (Hattie McDaniel) and Prissy (Butterfly McQueen) populate as epic story of enduring appeal across generations.

  • Doctor Zhivago [DVD] [1965] Doctor Zhivago | DVD | (10/05/2010) from £6.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (61.10%)  |  RRP £17.99

    David Lean's wintry adaptation of Boris Pasternak's melodramatic Russian Revolution romance, Doctor Zhivago, is a masterpiece of epic filmmaking, but one that risks leaving the viewer cold. Though none of the film was shot in the then USSR, Lean's assured technique nevertheless illuminates the breathtaking backgrounds magnificently: from the snowy wastes of the Urals to the strife-torn streets of Moscow, Lean stages a series of wonderful set-pieces showing war, revolution and its terrible aftermath. The problem lies in the foreground. Omar Sharif's entirely passive Zhivago is, we are told, a romantic poet of great sensitivity who internalises all his emotions and expresses them in verse. The trouble is the audience never gets to see a line of his poems, not even the centrally important "Lara" cycle. Thus Zhivago at the end of the picture is as much an emotional blank to us as he was at the beginning. His affair with the idealised beauty that is Julie Christie's Lara is also taken for granted by the filmmakers rather than set up in any convincing way, their mutual attraction remaining a mystery that creates a vacuum at the core of the picture. Given that none of the central characters with the exception of Rod Steiger's fire-breathing lecher Komarovsky ever give way to strong emotions, the romantic heart of the film remains oddly frigid. Matters are not helped by composer Maurice Jarre's incessant "Lara's Theme", which many will find teeth-grindingly irritating. Still, any David Lean epic, even a flawed one, is always going to be a first-class cinematic experience, and Zhivago is assuredly that. On the DVD: A stunning anamorphic widescreen print is the ideal way to appreciate David Lean's craftsmanship and this movie's glorious, wintry cinematography. Maurice Jarre's "Lara's Theme" and the rest of his patchwork score can be heard in a music-only track, while Omar Sharif is joined by Lean's widow Sandra and Rod Steiger for an intermittent commentary. The second bonus disc contains a good hour-long making-of documentary plus 10 shorter contemporary documentaries giving various insights into the location shooting and the cast and crew. But it's the sheer beauty of the picture that will astonish and make this disc forever treasurable. --Mark Walker

  • Finding Neverland [DVD] [2004] Finding Neverland | DVD | (18/04/2011) from £4.49  |  Saving you £15.50 (77.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Unlock your imagination... Finding Neverland is a tale of magic and fantasy inspired by the life of Peter Pan author James Barrie. Set in London 1904 the film is a fictional account of Barrie's creative struggle to bring Peter Pan to life from his first inspiration up until the play's premiere - a night that will change not only Barrie's own life but the lives of everyone close to him.

  • Fahrenheit 451 [1966] Fahrenheit 451 | DVD | (10/11/2003) from £4.10  |  Saving you £5.89 (59.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The classic science fiction novel by Ray Bradbury was a curious choice for one of the leading directors of the French New Wave, François Truffaut. But from the opening credits onward (spoken, not written on screen), Truffaut takes Bradbury's fascinating premise and makes it his own. The futuristic society depicted in Fahrenheit 451 is a culture without books. Firemen still race around in red trucks and wear helmets, but their job is to start fires: they ferret out forbidden stashes of books, douse them with petrol and make public bonfires. Oskar Werner, the star of Truffaut's Jules and Jim, plays a fireman named Montag, whose exposure to David Copperfield wakens an instinct towards reading and individual thought. (That's why books are banned--they give people too many ideas.) In an intriguing casting flourish, Julie Christie plays two roles: Montag's bored, drugged-up wife and the woman who helps kindle the spark of rebellion. The great Bernard Herrmann wrote the hard-driving music; Nicolas Roeg provided the cinematography. Fahrenheit 451 received a cool critical reception and has never quite been accepted by Truffaut fans or sci-fi buffs. Its deliberately listless manner has always been a problem, although that is part of its point; the lack of reading has made people dry and empty. If the movie is a bit stiff (Truffaut did not speak English well and never tried another project in English), it nevertheless is full of intriguing touches, and the ending is lyrical and haunting. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com

  • Shampoo Shampoo | DVD | (08/12/2003) from £4.18  |  Saving you £1.81 (30.20%)  |  RRP £5.99

    A modish creation teased into life by Warren Beatty, Shampoo was an offbeat Hollywood hit back in 1975. Made after Watergate, it reflects on the hedonism of late-60s Los Angeles with a sad, somewhat cynical eye. Basically a bedroom farce, fuelled by some famously raunchy dialogue, its comedy is nevertheless underlain with melancholy. Screenwriter Robert Towne was inspired by Wycherly's Restoration comedy The Country Wife, wherein a wily fellow convinces friends of his impotence even while he is merrily seducing their wives. Hence, Towne invented handsome Beverly Hills hairdresser George Roundy (Beatty), who ought to be gay, but emphatically isn't. Shampoo begins on US Election Day, 1968, as Nixon is trouncing McGovern at the polls, and George Roundy is trying to sort his life out. An earnest advocate of sensual pleasure, he beds most of his female clients, from the fretful Jill (Goldie Hawn) to the wealthy Felicia (Lee Grant). Yet George is himself unfulfilled, and imagines that owning his own salon will satisfy him. He asks Felicia's husband Lester (Jack Warden) to back him, but first Lester coerces George into squiring his mistress Jackie (Julie Christie) to a Nixon victory party. Inevitably, Jackie is another of George's girls and, having seduced Felicia's vivacious daughter (Carrie Fisher) earlier that day, George has much to conceal from Lester and Felicia as the evening's festivities unravel. Shampoo shows the 60s turning sour. The characters are rich hippies, superficially liberated but deeply unhappy, and blandly indifferent to the dawning of the Nixon era. The excellent Lee Grant won an Oscar, but Shampoo is Beatty's film. He produced it, had a substantive hand in Towne's script, and deputised the nominal director, Hal Ashby. The film mildly exploits legends of Beatty's real-life sexual prowess, but mainly it embodies his commitment to making thoughtful movies for grown-ups. Richard Kelly

  • Don't Look Now  (Digitally Restored) [DVD] Don't Look Now (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (19/09/2011) from £7.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Don’t look now tells the story of an English couple, John (Donald Sutherland) and Laura Baxter (Julie Christie) who are still grieving over the tragic death of their daughter who drowned not far from their home in England. In a bid to put the past behind them and finally move on they relocate to Venice where they believe there will be no reminders of their beloved daughter’s horrific death.Not long after arriving John and Laura meet two elderly sisters, one of whom believes herself to be physic and insists that she has seen the spirit of John and Laura’s daughter. She also insists that John has the physic ability also and must leave the city as he is in great danger. Laura becomes concerned but John doesn’t believe any of it and is unfazed.Soon after this John begins to worry for his sanity as he starts to see disturbing images of his daughter walking the streets in a red coat. As John becomes more and more intrigued Laura becomes more concerned about his well-being as a series of murders take place in the city.Don’t look now was the third film from visionary director Nicolas Roeg (Performance) and was one of the most powerful and enterprising movies of the 1970’s well known for its notorious sex scene between Sutherland and Christie. -M.F.

  • Dragonheart Dragonheart | DVD | (01/08/2005) from £4.19  |  Saving you £5.80 (58.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Long ago when majestic fire-breathers soared through the skies there lived a knight who would come face-to-face and heart-to-heart with the most remarkable creature that ever existed. Dennis Quaid stars with the voice of Academy Award winner Sean Connery in director Rob Cohen's heroic adventure that blazes with fantasy humour and the most amazing special effects since Jurassic Park. Co-starring David Thewlis Pete Postlethwaite Julie Christie and Dina Meyer this epic adventure will move and thrill the entire family.

  • Darling [Blu-ray] Darling | Blu Ray | (30/03/2015) from £11.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (47.80%)  |  RRP £22.99

    "It's far too pleased with itself. I wince when I see it now", director John Schlesinger observes of his 1965 film, Darling. You can tell why he's embarrassed. Looking back, his swinging 60s' satire about a model (Julie Christie) so keen to get ahead that she ditches her husband and betrays a succession of boyfriends looks hideously dated. With its self-consciously hip dialogue and unnecessary voice-over, the screenplay by Frederic Raphael (who also wrote Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut) doesn't help. Most of the men Christie encounters, whether Laurence Harvey's slick businessman (who can't pass a mirror without preening himself in it) or Dirk Bogarde's neurotic TV pundit (who has delusions of literary grandeur), are as narcissistic as she is. Although this seems to be a cautionary tale about slick, superficial London media and fashion folk, it's obvious that the filmmakers are half in love with the world they're pretending to lampoon. The visual gags--rich, society matrons at a charity event gorging themselves on food or Christie's poster being plastered over an image of a starving child--are heavy-handed in the extreme. Still, Christie is tremendous in the role which established her as an international star (she won an Oscar). However shallow and selfish her character seems, we can't help but warm to her. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • Billy Liar - 50th Anniversary Edition [DVD] [1963] Billy Liar - 50th Anniversary Edition | DVD | (06/05/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Billy Liar was the multimedia phenomenon of its era. Starting out as a novel by Yorkshire writer Keith Waterhouse, it rapidly became a long-running stage play, adapted by Waterhouse with playwright Willis Hall, which lead to the movie, scripted by Waterhouse and Hall for John Schlesinger to direct, then a stage musical and finally a spin-off TV series. Do you get the feeling it caught the mood of the times? The basic set-up owes a lot to James Thurber's classic short story The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. Our hero, Billy Fisher, lives at home in a Bradford semi with his nagging parents and works as a lowly clerk in an undertaker's parlour. But, in his imagination he lives a rich and varied fantasy life as gallant military leader, suave socialite, best-selling novelist and so forth. Trouble is, he can't always keep fantasy and reality apart, any more than he can the keep two girls he's engaged to separate. Not to mention his other problems?. Schlesinger's direction brings out the desperation behind the comedy, and Tom Courtenay, at once defiant and hangdog, slips perfectly into the role created on stage by Albert Finney. But the whole cast's a joy, not least the great Leonard Rossiter as undertaker Mr Shadrach, Billy's saturnine boss. And then there's Julie Christie--the luminous spirit of the Swinging 60s--in her first starring role as the girl who offers Billy a chance of real escape. At the end, when she takes the train to London, away from the smoke and the grimness "oop" north, the whole British New Wave went with her. On the DVD: just the theatrical trailer which is a fairly crass affair. There's been no remastering, it seems, but both sound and vision are clean enough and the print preserves the original's full 2.35:1 widescreen ratio. --Philip Kemp

  • Stanley Baxter Collection Stanley Baxter Collection | DVD | (03/11/2008) from £18.39  |  Saving you £21.60 (54.00%)  |  RRP £39.99

    Stanley Baxter Collection (5 Discs)

  • Far From the Madding Crowd [Blu-ray] [1967] Far From the Madding Crowd | Blu Ray | (01/06/2015) from £11.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (50.00%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Headstrong and passionate Bathsheba Everdene (Julie Christie) unexpectedly inherits a large farm in rural Dorset. Struggling to manage the farm herself she captivates the hearts and minds of three very different men: an honest and hardworking sheep farmer (Alan Bates) a wealthy but tortured landowner (Peter Finch) and a reckless and violent swordsman (Terence Stamp). But as emotions become entangled free spirited and innocent folly soon leads to devastating tragedy. The restoration process of Far From the Madding Crowd was overseen by the film’s cinematographer and acclaimed director Nicolas Roeg. The Digital Film restoration was funded by STUDIOCANAL in collaboration the BFI’s Unlocking Film Heritage programme Awarding funds from the National Lottery.

  • Don't Look Now - Special Edition [Blu-ray] Don't Look Now - Special Edition | Blu Ray | (04/07/2011) from £11.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (47.80%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Nicolas Roeg's chilling film is based on a short story by Daphne du Maurier. John Baxter (Donald Sutherland) and his wife Laura (Julie Christie) journey to Venice for an off-season holiday in order to get over the sudden death of their young daughter. However upon their arrival John begins to suspect that he possesses latent psychic powers. A pair of weird sisters claim to have had visions of the Baxters' daughter and John later sees a red-coated figure who resembles his child flitting around the local canals.

  • The Merchant Ivory Collection The Merchant Ivory Collection | DVD | (20/09/2004) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £169.99

  • Don't Look Now [1973] Don't Look Now | DVD | (29/07/2002) from £5.00  |  Saving you £4.05 (28.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Don't Look Now was filmed in 1973 and based around a Daphne Du Maurier novel. Directed by Nicolas Roeg, it has lost none of its chill: like Kubrick's The Shining, its dazzling use of juxtaposition, colour, sound and editing make it a seductive experience in cinematic terror, whose aftershock lingers in daydreams and nightmares, filling you with uncertainty and dread even after its horrific climax. Donald Sutherland plays John Baxter, an architect, Julie Christie his wife: a well-to-do couple whose young daughter drowns while out playing. Cut to Venice, out of season, where the couple encounter a pair of sisters, one of whom claims psychic powers and to have communicated with their dead daughter. The subsequent plot is as labyrinthine as the back streets of the city itself, down which Baxter spots a diminutive and elusive red-coated figure akin to his daughter, before being drawn into an almost unbearable finale. Don't Look Now is a Gothic masterpiece, with its melange of gore, mystery, ecstasy, the supernatural and above all grief, while the city of Venice itself--which thanks to Roeg and his team seems to breathe like a dark, sinister living organism throughout the movie--deserves a credit in its own right. Not just a magnificent drama but an advanced feat of cinema. --David Stubbs

  • The Fast Lady [1962] The Fast Lady | DVD | (02/02/2004) from £2.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (70.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Murdoch Troon (Baxter) attempts to woo the daughter (Christie) of wealthy businessman Charles Chingford by impressing her with a vintage Bentley known as 'The Fast Lady'...

  • Darling [DVD] Darling | DVD | (30/03/2015) from £7.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (55.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    "It's far too pleased with itself. I wince when I see it now", director John Schlesinger observes of his 1965 film, Darling. You can tell why he's embarrassed. Looking back, his swinging 60s' satire about a model (Julie Christie) so keen to get ahead that she ditches her husband and betrays a succession of boyfriends looks hideously dated. With its self-consciously hip dialogue and unnecessary voice-over, the screenplay by Frederic Raphael (who also wrote Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut) doesn't help. Most of the men Christie encounters, whether Laurence Harvey's slick businessman (who can't pass a mirror without preening himself in it) or Dirk Bogarde's neurotic TV pundit (who has delusions of literary grandeur), are as narcissistic as she is. Although this seems to be a cautionary tale about slick, superficial London media and fashion folk, it's obvious that the filmmakers are half in love with the world they're pretending to lampoon. The visual gags--rich, society matrons at a charity event gorging themselves on food or Christie's poster being plastered over an image of a starving child--are heavy-handed in the extreme. Still, Christie is tremendous in the role which established her as an international star (she won an Oscar). However shallow and selfish her character seems, we can't help but warm to her. --Geoffrey Macnab

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