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Kenneth More

  • Reach For The Sky [1956] Reach For The Sky | DVD | (19/06/2007) from £4.49  |  Saving you £5.50 (55.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Reach for the Sky was a box-office hit in 1956 and rightly remains a fondly regarded classic of British cinema. Kenneth More is ideally cast as Douglas Bader, the gifted pilot who loses both legs in a pre-war air crash, only to play a major role in the Battle of Britain, rise to the rank of Group Captain and become a war hero. Based on Paul Brickhill's biography, this is an "official" history maybe, but Lewis Gilbert's screenplay and direction are historically accurate and informed by that very British humour, of which More was a natural. The film is graced by a decent supporting cast and a typically "widescreen" score from John Addison. On the DVD: Reach for the Sky is vividly reproduced in 16:9 anamorphic format and decent mono. There are subtitles for the hard of hearing and detailed biographies of More, Gilbert and Barder. The original theatrical trailer is included, but it would also have made sense to include an interview or documentary footage of Bader himself. --Richard Whitehouse

  • Genevieve -- Special Edition [1953] Genevieve -- Special Edition | DVD | (11/06/2007) from £4.94  |  Saving you £10.90 (68.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    For anyone who travels the congested roads of Britain these days the utterly delightful Genevieve will provoke a wistful, nostalgic sigh of regret for times gone by when there were no motorways, traffic jams were almost non-existent and friendly police motorcyclists riding classic Nortons (without helmets) cheerfully let people driving vintage cars race each other along country lanes. Even in 1953, Henry Cornelius’ gentle comedy must have seemed pleasingly old-fashioned, concerned as it is with the antics of two obsessive enthusiasts on the annual London to Brighton classic car rally. The principal quartet could hardly be bettered: though John Gregson is something of a cold fish as Genevieve’s proud owner, the radiant warmth of Dinah Sheridan as his long-suffering wife more than compensates. Kenneth More is ideally cast in the role of boastful rival enthusiast and Kay Kendall has possibly the best comic moment of all when she astonishes everyone with her drunken trumpet playing. Cornelius also directed Ealing’s Passport to Pimlico, so his sure eye for gently mocking and celebrating British eccentricities is never in doubt. The screenplay by (American writer) William Rose now seems like an elegy to a way of life long disappeared: the pivotal moment when Gregson stops to humour a passing old buffer about his love of classic cars comes from a vanished era of politeness before road rage; as does the priceless exchange between hotel owner Joyce Grenfell and her aged resident: "No one’s ever complained before", says the mystified Grenfell after Gregson and Sheridan moan about the facilities, "Are they Americans?" asks the old lady, unable to conceive that anyone British could say such things. Genevieve is both a wonderful period comedy and a nostalgic portrait of England the way it used to be. On the DVD: the "Special Edition" version of Genevieve has a decent new documentary with reminiscences from Dinah Sheridan (still radiant), the director of photography and the film’s editor, who talk about the challenges of filming on location. Most treasurable of all, though, is legendary harmonica player Larry Adler, who remembers his distinctive score with much fondness and is not at all embittered by his Hollywood blacklisting, which meant he was denied an Academy Award nomination. There’s also a short piece on some of the locations used (which for economic reasons were mostly in the lanes around Pinewood studios), cast biographies and a gallery of stills. The 4:3 ratio colour picture looks pretty good for its age and the mono sound is adequate. --Mark Walker

  • Five Children And It [2004] Five Children And It | DVD | (21/03/2005) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Written by E.Nesbit author of 'The Railway Children' this is the movie of five childrens' chance encounter with 'The Psammead' - an ancient extremely irritable sand fairy who has the ability to make wishes come. The only problem is that the wishes only last till sunset and the children also find it hard to think of sensible wishes!

  • Scrooge Scrooge | DVD | (22/11/2004) from £2.99  |  Saving you £11.13 (69.60%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A mixed bag as variations on A Christmas Carol go, this 1970 British musical tells the usual story of Scrooge (Albert Finney) and his spirits on Christmas Eve, although the whole thing is set to music by Leslie Bricusse. Except for Finney's feisty and involved performance, however, there isn't much to recommend this. The songs, which absorb so much of the evolving story line and emotions, are not all that good. Plenty of support, however, from the likes of Roy Kinnear (Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory) and Dame Edith Evans (Tom Jones), the handsome production is directed by veteran Ronald Neame (The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie). --Tom Keogh

  • The Thirty Nine Steps [1959] The Thirty Nine Steps | DVD | (07/07/2003) from £4.69  |  Saving you £5.30 (53.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    While it's true that this 1959 screen adaptation of The 39 Steps pales in comparison to Alfred Hitchcock's seminal 1935 version, it's still a thoroughly enjoyable romp that compensates for a lack of any tension whatsoever with a generous dose of genial good humour. Affable Kenneth More's Richard Hannay more closely resembles the kind of roles Cary Grant was playing for Hitch in the late 1950s; Finnish blonde Taina Elg, in the somewhat unlikely role of a prim Scottish schoolmistress, is his love interest. Although handcuffed together, More and Elg fail to radiate any sexual chemistry, even when scandalously forced to share a room and a bed. Much better are the delightful cameos: Sid James as a roguish lorry driver; Brenda De Banzie as voluptuous psychic Nellie; and Joan Hickson as a simpering teacher. As a thriller it's hardly in the same league as North by Northwest, but as a window on life in England and Scotland in the 1950s, this 39 Steps has much to recommend it. --Mark Walker

  • Northwest Frontier [1959] Northwest Frontier | DVD | (17/05/2004) from £4.69  |  Saving you £5.30 (53.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Captain Scott (More) is sent by the British Governor in India to rescue a five year old Hindu prince and his American governess (Bacall) when a rebellion breaks out among the tribesmen. Pursued by the abductors the trio commandeer a derelict steam train to take them 300 miles through the mountains to safety...

  • Kenneth More Collection Kenneth More Collection | DVD | (15/10/2007) from £14.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Affable bright and breezy Kenneth More epitomised the traditional English virtues of fortitude and fun. At the height of his fame in the 1950s he was Britain's most popular film star and had appeared in a string of box office hits including Genevieve (1953) Doctor in the House (1954) Reach for the Sky (1956) and A Night to Remember (1958). Like many British actors he commuted between film and theatre and steadily became of or Britain's most treasured actors. This 8 disc collection celebrates some of his greatest work. Films include: Chance of a Lifetime (1950): The workers in a small plough factory take over the firm but when a large order falls through the old management come back to help out. Genevieve (1953): Two friends race their vintage cars on the annual London to Brighton rally. But once they place a 'friendly' wager on who will win the race the competitive juices start flowing! Genevieve is the name of one of the cars which like her competitor runs into one problem after another. A Night to Remember (1958): Based on the best selling book by Walter Lord this is the true story of the R.M.S. Titanic which struck an iceberg on its maiden voyage from Europe to New York in 1912. The Galloping Major (1951): An elderly pet shop owner who sets up a scheme to buy ""Montana Mist "" a race horse who promises to finish in the money. When the animals are switched at an auction his lifelong dream comes crashing down - unless the old glue horse he has purchased turns out to be more than meets the eye. North West Frontier (1959): Captain Scott (More) is sent by the British Governor in India to rescue a five year old Hindu prince and his American governess (Bacall) when a rebellion breaks out among the tribesmen. Pursued by the abductors the trio commandeer a derelict steam train to take them 300 miles through the mountains to safety... Reach for the Sky (1956): A story of one man's indomitable courage and endurance. As a young sports-loving Pilot Officer Douglas Bader loses both legs in a flying accident. Not only does he overcome his devastating disability; he goes on to become a Battle of Britain ace. Eventually Bader is shot down and imprisoned in Germany. In 1945 when three hundred aircraft fly in triumph over London led by a solitary Spitfire the honour of leading the fly-past goes to Douglas Bader. This is the story of one of the few to whom so many owed so much.

  • The Forsyte Saga - Complete Series 1-7 Box Set [1967] The Forsyte Saga - Complete Series 1-7 Box Set | DVD | (23/08/2004) from £49.99  |  Saving you £10.34 (14.80%)  |  RRP £69.99

    The Forsyte Saga is often cited as the first television miniseries; it wasn't, but there's no question that it was a singular, powerful cultural phenomenon that deservedly got under the skin of European viewers in 1967. Today the 26-episode production, based on several novels and short stories by John Galsworthy, is a more timeless enterprise than many of the protracted British TV dramas that have followed. While it would be wrong to consider The Forsyte Saga high art, it's certainly a mesmerizing and inspired mix of theater, sprawling Victorian narrative, thinking man's soap opera, and some finely tuned, 1960s black-and-white production values that (especially when shot outdoors) are strikingly handsome. Above all, Forsyte is driven by its characters--perhaps to an extreme, though the two-generation storyline makes no apologies for creating compelling people whose capacity for short-sighted blundering, bursts of grace, and slow-brewing redemption make them recognizably human. Eric Porter towers over everything as Soames Forsyte, a humorless attorney whose guiding principles of measurable value cause great heartache but slowly evolve, leaving him a graying, good father, arts patron, and sympathetic repository of memory. From the cast of 150 or so, other standouts include Susan Hampshire as Soames's troubled daughter, Nyree Dawn Porter as the wife of two very different Forsyte men, and Kenneth More as the family's artistic black sheep. --Tom Keogh

  • Sink the Bismarck / The Enemy Below (Double Pack) [1960] Sink the Bismarck / The Enemy Below (Double Pack) | DVD | (02/06/2003) from £5.24  |  Saving you £9.75 (65.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    The Enemy Below and Sink the Bismarck! form a double feature of semi-classic CinemaScope-era WWII naval dramas sailing from the Fox vault onto DVD for the first time. In The Enemy Below Robert Mitchum and Curt Jurgens are respectively captains of a US destroyer and a German U-boat whose vessels come into conflict in the South Atlantic. Both are good men with a job to do, the script noting Jurgens' distaste for Hitler and the Nazis and engaging our sympathy with the German sailors almost as much as the Americans. Made at the height of the Cold War of the 1950s, the film delivers a liberal message of cooperation wrapped inside some spectacular action scenes and a story that builds to a tense and exciting, moving finale. Sink the Bismarck! is a British film dating from three years later and adopts a more documentary style in recounting the race against time to track and destroy what was in 1941 the most powerful battleship then built, the Bismarck. Shot in gleaming black and white so as to make use of genuine WWII archive footage, the film is held together by the introduction of a fictional naval officer in overall command of the operation, played excellently by Kenneth More. To add some human warmth he is given a tentative romantic subplot with a WREN played by the luminous Dana Wynter. Though initially slow to gather steam, Sink the Bismarck! finally delivers an epic, thoroughly horrifying conclusion. On the DVD: The Enemy Below and Sink the Bismarck! come as a two-disc set with multiple language and subtitle options, including English for Hard of Hearing, but no extras other than the original trailers. These are presented at 16:9 and 2.35:1. Both are rather faded, but are fine examples of an era when watching the previews didn't guarantee a migraine. Both films are anamorphically enhanced in their original 2.35:1 CinemaScope, and, bar a little grain in some shots and the inevitably inferior archive footage, the picture quality is excellent. The Enemy Below boasts sturdy three-channel sound (left, front, right) while Sink the Bismarck! is in very well mixed stereo. --Gary S Dalkin

  • Admirable Crichton, The [DVD] Admirable Crichton, The | DVD | (20/09/2010) from £4.72  |  Saving you £5.27 (52.80%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Kenneth More stars as Crichton, the impeccable butler to Lord Henry Loam (Cecil Parker) in Lewis Gilberts evergreen British comedy classic. Crichton is a man who knows his place in the grand scheme of things. He's supremely happy being a gentleman's gentleman - until fate takes a strange twist!

  • A Night To Remember [1958] A Night To Remember | DVD | (19/06/2007) from £4.62  |  Saving you £15.37 (76.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Two years after 20th Century Fox released its melodramatic disaster film Titanic in 1953, Walter Lord's meticulously researched book A Night to Remember surprised its publishers by becoming a phenomenal bestseller. Lord had an intuition that readers craved the reality of the Titanic disaster and not the romantically mythologised translations (like Fox's film, starring Barbara Stanwyck), which relied on fictional characters to "enhance" the world's worst maritime disaster. Lord's book proved that the truth was far more compelling than fiction, outlining the many "if onlys" (if only the iceberg had been spotted a few minutes earlier, etc.) that lent sombre irony to the loss of 1,500 Titanic passengers. Three years after Lord's book appeared, it was brought to the screen with the kind of riveting authenticity that Lord had insisted upon in his own research. The 1958 British production of A Night to Remember remains a definitive dramatization of the disaster, adhering to the known facts of the time and achieving a documentary-like immediacy that matches (and in some ways surpasses) the James Cameron epic released 39 years later. The film erroneously perpetuates the once-common belief that the Titanic sunk in one piece (instead of breaking in half as its bow began to plunge), but many other misconceptions are accurately corrected, and the intelligent screenplay by thriller master Eric Ambler is a model of factual suspense. By making Titanic the star of the film, director Roy Baker emphasises the excessive confidence of the booming industrial age and creates an intense you-are-there realism that pays tribute to Walter Lord's tenacious quest for truth. --Jeff Shannon

  • Some People [DVD] Some People | DVD | (20/05/2013) from £6.29  |  Saving you £3.70 (37.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A lively musical tale of teen rebellion Some People stars BAFTA winner Kenneth More alongside a group of young actors on the cusp of bursting onto the Swinging London film scene. Ray Brooks Annika (Anneke) Wills and David Hemmings play the young bored rebels living for kicks in this key British film from the early 1960s. Some People is featured here in a brand-new transfer from original film elements in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Young and bored Johnnie Bill and Bert are teenaged tearaways whose only interests are motorbikes and rock music. When they are banned from riding and fined heavily they become convinced that society has no use for them. But a choirmaster finds them playing rock on a church organ and for some of them at least there seems to be a way out of a no-hope situation... SPECIAL FEATURES [] Full-frame 4:3 as-filmed version of main feature [] Original theatrical trailer [] Image gallery [] Press book PDF

  • A Night to Remember [Blu-ray] [1958] A Night to Remember | Blu Ray | (19/03/2012) from £6.29  |  Saving you £13.70 (68.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Two years after 20th Century Fox released its melodramatic disaster film Titanic in 1953, Walter Lord's meticulously researched book A Night to Remember surprised its publishers by becoming a phenomenal bestseller. Lord had an intuition that readers craved the reality of the Titanic disaster and not the romantically mythologised translations (like Fox's film, starring Barbara Stanwyck), which relied on fictional characters to "enhance" the world's worst maritime disaster. Lord's book proved that the truth was far more compelling than fiction, outlining the many "if onlys" (if only the iceberg had been spotted a few minutes earlier, etc.) that lent sombre irony to the loss of 1,500 Titanic passengers. Three years after Lord's book appeared, it was brought to the screen with the kind of riveting authenticity that Lord had insisted upon in his own research. The 1958 British production of A Night to Remember remains a definitive dramatization of the disaster, adhering to the known facts of the time and achieving a documentary-like immediacy that matches (and in some ways surpasses) the James Cameron epic released 39 years later. The film erroneously perpetuates the once-common belief that the Titanic sunk in one piece (instead of breaking in half as its bow began to plunge), but many other misconceptions are accurately corrected, and the intelligent screenplay by thriller master Eric Ambler is a model of factual suspense. By making Titanic the star of the film, director Roy Baker emphasises the excessive confidence of the booming industrial age and creates an intense you-are-there realism that pays tribute to Walter Lord's tenacious quest for truth. --Jeff Shannon

  • Sink the Bismarck! [DVD] [1960] Sink the Bismarck! | DVD | (09/04/2012) from £3.01  |  Saving you £6.98 (69.90%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The story of one of World War II's most famous sea battles is brought to the screen in this exciting semi-documentary style movie.In the Spring of 1941, Nazi Germany's greatest battleship- the Bismarck, scourge of Atlantic shipping, is pinned down at her anchorage in Norway. Making a break for freedom and the safety of air cover from the Luftwaffe, the great ship is chased by the Royal Navy.Kenneth More stars as Captain Shepard- the Admiralty's Director of Naval Operations who, embittered by the death of his wife in an air raid, is assigned to this post just as the Bismarck makes its escape.Excellent special effects make this tense, exciting sea drama one of the finest British war films ever made.

  • The Sheriff Of Fractured Jaw [DVD] The Sheriff Of Fractured Jaw | DVD | (27/02/2012) from £10.85  |  Saving you £2.14 (16.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A salesman for a London sporting gun company, Mr. Jonathan Tibbs (Kenneth More) heads west when he hears that cowboys are rather fond of their firearms. Despite his impeccable manners and immaculate tailoring, once in the lawless frontier town of Fractured Jaw he is accidentally mistaken for the fastest gun in the West - and quickly appointed sheriff!Mr Tibb's English charm melts the heart of Miss Kate (Jayne Mansfield), the local saloon owner, but he's soon in big trouble. He's made the tiny faux pas of selling his guns to hostile Indians, a range war has broken out between the gunfighters of the Box T and Lazy S ranches - and the local undertaker is already measuring him up for Boot Hill...

  • Classic War Stories - 5 Film Collection [DVD] [1949] Classic War Stories - 5 Film Collection | DVD | (19/11/2012) from £10.99  |  Saving you £24.00 (68.60%)  |  RRP £34.99

    <b>The Longest Day:</b> On June 6, 1944, the Allied Invasion of France marked the beginning of the end of Nazi domination over Europe. The attack involved 3,000,000 men, 11,000 planes and 4,000 ships, comprising the largest armada the world has ever seen. Presented in its original black & white version, 'The Longest Day' is a vivid, hour-by-hour re-creation of this historic event. Featuring a stellar international cast, and told from the perspectives of both sides, it is a fascinating look ...

  • Scott Of The Antarctic [DVD] Scott Of The Antarctic | DVD | (06/06/2016) from £8.98  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Ealing Studios' output from the 1940s and the 1950s helped define what was arguably the golden age for British cinema. It fostered great directors such as Alexander MacKendrick and Robert Hamer, while giving stars such as Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers the chance to shine. John Mills stars as Captain Robert Scott in this film of the explorer's ill-fated expedition to be the first man to discover the South Pole. Directed by Charles Frend who went on to direct The Magnet, the film was nominated for both the Golden Lion in Venice and the BAFTA for Best British Film.

  • Father Brown Boxed Set [DVD] Father Brown Boxed Set | DVD | (23/05/2011) from £11.99  |  Saving you £21.00 (63.70%)  |  RRP £32.99

    Featuring all 13 episodes in the 1974 TV series starring Kenneth More Father Brown is the creation of the great British novelist G.K. Chesterton appearing in over fifty short stories. This Catholic Priest turned detective is both a rival and a partner in crime to such great sleuths as Hercule Poirot Sherlock Holmes and Miss Marple further enlivening the English appetite for a little murder and mystery with its afternoon tea.

  • The Comedy Man [DVD] The Comedy Man | DVD | (21/04/2014) from £7.69  |  Saving you £2.30 (23.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A series of &#39;50s box-office hits including Genevieve and A Night to Remember established Kenneth More as one of Britain&#39;s most accomplished and durable leading men and this bittersweet 1963 comedy further demonstrated the breadth of his talent. The Comedy Man features one of More&#39;s most compelling and sympathetic performances as an embattled but resolutely upbeat provincial actor staring middle age and failure in the face; wry touching and deftly scripted with a superb supporting cast it is easy to see why More ranked this film among his favourites. The Comedy Man is presented here in a brand-new digital transfer from the original film elements in its original aspect ratio. Following an indiscretion involving the producer&#39;s wife rep actor Chick Byrd is fired from the play in which he has had a leading role. Heading to London in search of bigger and better things he is reunited with a number of similarly straitened thespians as well as his spirited kind-hearted former love Judy. But it seems Byrd may be poised to find fame and even some fortune when in desperation he manages to land himself the starring role in a deodorant commercial... Special Features: Original Theatrical Trailer Image Gallery Original Promotional PDF

  • A Night to Remember (Digitally Re-mastered) [DVD] [1958] A Night to Remember (Digitally Re-mastered) | DVD | (19/03/2012) from £5.69  |  Saving you £10.30 (64.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Two years after 20th Century Fox released its melodramatic disaster film Titanic in 1953, Walter Lord's meticulously researched book A Night to Remember surprised its publishers by becoming a phenomenal bestseller. Lord had an intuition that readers craved the reality of the Titanic disaster and not the romantically mythologised translations (like Fox's film, starring Barbara Stanwyck), which relied on fictional characters to "enhance" the world's worst maritime disaster. Lord's book proved that the truth was far more compelling than fiction, outlining the many "if onlys" (if only the iceberg had been spotted a few minutes earlier, etc.) that lent sombre irony to the loss of 1,500 Titanic passengers. Three years after Lord's book appeared, it was brought to the screen with the kind of riveting authenticity that Lord had insisted upon in his own research. The 1958 British production of A Night to Remember remains a definitive dramatization of the disaster, adhering to the known facts of the time and achieving a documentary-like immediacy that matches (and in some ways surpasses) the James Cameron epic released 39 years later. The film erroneously perpetuates the once-common belief that the Titanic sunk in one piece (instead of breaking in half as its bow began to plunge), but many other misconceptions are accurately corrected, and the intelligent screenplay by thriller master Eric Ambler is a model of factual suspense. By making Titanic the star of the film, director Roy Baker emphasises the excessive confidence of the booming industrial age and creates an intense you-are-there realism that pays tribute to Walter Lord's tenacious quest for truth. --Jeff Shannon

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