HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

Kyle MacLachlan: List of Movies, Films and TV Shows

  • Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series [DVD] Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series | DVD | (04/12/2017) from £19.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A quarter century after revolutionizing television, Twin Peaks returns. Expanding the world you thought you knew, this limited event series takes you places wonderful, strange and farther out. This DVD collection includes all 18 parts of the Showtime series, plus a wealth of exclusive, behind-the-scenes special features that will show you what's behind the red curtain and the making of this extraordinary television event. Features: Series Promos Twin Peaks: Phenomenon (Featurettes) Comic-Con 2017: Twin Peaks Panel Rancho Rosa Logos Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery The Man with the Gray Elevated Hair Tell It Martin Two Blue Balls The Number of Completion Bad Binoculars See You On The Other Side Dear Friend Do Not Pick Up Hitchhikers A Bloody Finger In Your Mouth The Polish Accountant A Pot of Boiling Oil

  • Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series (Slipcase Version) [Blu-ray] [2017] Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series (Slipcase Version) | Blu Ray | (11/12/2017) from £29.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (14.30%)  |  RRP £34.99

    A quarter century after revolutionizing television, Twin Peaks returns. Expanding the world you thought you knew, this limited event series takes you places wonderful, strange and farther out. This Blu-ray collection includes all 18 parts of the Showtime series, plus a wealth of exclusive, behind-the-scenes special features that will show you what's behind the red curtain and the making of this extraordinary television event. Bonus Features Series Promos Twin Peaks: Phenomenon (Featurettes) Comic-Con 2017: Twin Peaks Panel A Very Lovely Dream: One Week in Twin Peaks Richard Beymer Films Rancho Rosa Logos Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery The Man with the Gray Elevated Hair Tell It Martin Two Blue Balls The Number of Completion Bad Binoculars See You On The Other Side Dear Friend Do Not Pick Up Hitchhikers A Bloody Finger In Your Mouth The Polish Accountant A Pot of Boiling Oil

  • Twin Peaks - Definitive Gold Box Edition (Slimline Packaging) [DVD] Twin Peaks - Definitive Gold Box Edition (Slimline Packaging) | DVD | (12/11/2012) from £9.95  |  Saving you £0.54 (5.10%)  |  RRP £10.49

    Lose yourself in David Lynch and Mark Frost's murder mystery-soap opera, which unfolds, in one character's words, like a beautiful dream and terrible nightmare all at once. Season 1Twin Peaks devotees, who have kept the mystery alive on myriad Web sites, will jump at the chance to return to the spooky town that might just be the anti-Mayberry. Rarely syndicated, the Twin Peaks television series has lost none of its quirky and queasy power to get under your skin and haunt your dreams. So brew up a pot of some damn fine coffee, dig into some cherry pie, and lose yourself in David Lynch and Mark Frost's murder mystery and soap opera, which unfolds, in one character's words, like a beautiful dream and terrible nightmare all at once. Twin Peaks was a pop culture phenomenon for one season at least, until the increasingly bizarre twists and maddening teases so confounded audiences that they lost interest in just who killed Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). This series was a career peak for most of its eclectic ensemble cast, including Kyle MacLachlan as straight-arrow FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper, Michael Ontkean as local Sheriff Harry S. Truman, Sherilyn Fenn as bad girl Audrey Horne, Peggy Lipton as waitress Norma Jennings, and Catherine Coulson as the Log Lady. Alumni enjoying current success include Lara Flynn Boyle (The Practice), as good girl Donna Hayward, and Miguel Ferrer (Crossing Jordan), hilarious as forensics expert Albert Rosenfield (who has absolutely no social niceties). -Donald Liebenson Season 2Don't search for all the answers at once, says a giant appearing to FBI Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) in a vision. A path is formed by laying one stone at a time. In Twin Peaks, that's easier said than done. Over the course of two seasons, that path went nowhere and everywhere. Bureau guidelines, deductive technique, Tibetan method, and luck don't cut it here. It also takes a little magic, which is what makes David Lynch and Mark Frost's bracingly original serial drama one of TV's ultimate trips, and still the stuff that fever dreams are made of. With the DVD release of season 2, die-hard Peakers can rekindle their obsession with this macabre, maddening, sinister, and surreal series set in the rural Pacific Northwest community whose bucolic surroundings hide things dark and heinous. (If you're new to Twin Peaks, best to get the lay of the land by watching the brilliant feature-length pilot and the instant-cult-classic first season, which capture Twin at its peak.) Three main mysteries drive season 2. First, there's the still (!) unresolved murder of Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). Then, there's the question of who shot Cooper in the season 1 cliffhanger. And finally, ultimately: What about Bob? With its dream logic, bizarre behavior, and nightmare imagery, much of what transpires goes right by you. Some subplots (Sherilyn Fenn's sexpot Audrey held captive at the bordello, One-Eyed Jacks) are easier to latch on to than others (amnesiac Nadine believes she's an 18-year-old high schooler) And, yes, that's a pre-X-Files David Duchovny as Dennis/Denice, a transsexual DEA agent. In Twin Peaks' second season, the truth is out there, but we are entering A Few Good Men territory. When Laura's killer is at last revealed in episode 16, no doubt many will not be able to handle the truth. The teases, red herrings, and out-and-out gonzo looniness will try the patience of viewers with a more conventional bent. But, as Cooper observes at one point, All in all, [it's] a very interesting experience, with enough doppelgangers, allusions, pop-culture references, and in-jokes to keep bloggers buzzing. If, for example, you get any pleasure from recognizing Hank Worden, who played Mose in The Searchers, as the world's most decrepit room service waiter, then Twin Peaks may just make you feel right at home. Episodes Comprise: All Episodes from Season 1 and 2 plus: Log Lady Intros (All Episodes) Original Pilot Original Pilot (International Version) Alternate Ending for Pilot (International Version) Deleted Scenes “A Slice of Lynch” Featurette Secrets From Another Place: Creating Twin Peaks (Feature Length Documentary) Saturday Night Live Sketch with Kyle MacLachlan Twin Peaks Festival “Return To Twin Peaks” Featurette Interactive Map The Black Lodge Archive: (Including “Falling” Music Video, Image Galleries, On Air Promos & TV Spots)

  • David Lynch Box Set [DVD] David Lynch Box Set | DVD | (04/06/2012) from £13.99  |  Saving you £1.01 (6.70%)  |  RRP £15

    Referred to as the most important filmmaker of the current era by The Guardian, David Lynch has carved out a stunning portfolio of work investigating the dark and seedy side of human nature with a delicious sense of black humour. Bringing together six of his most well-known films on DVD for the very first time, this boxset also includes several of Lunch's most famous short films, experimental films, rare interviews, documentaries, outtakes and more.Eraserhead (1977)Henry Spencer tries to survive his industrial environment, his angry girlfriend, and the unbearable screams of his newly born mutant child.Dune (1984)In the distant future, a man appears who may be the prophet that a long-suffering galaxy has been waiting for.Blue Velvet (1986)After finding a severed human ear in a field, a young man soon discovers a sinister underworld lying just beneath his idyllic suburban home town.Wild At Heart (1990)Young lovers Sailor and Lula run from the variety of weirdos that Lula's mom has hired to kill Sailor.Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992)A young FBI agent disappears while investigating a murder miles from Twin Peaks that may be related to the future murder of Laura Palmer; the last week of the life of Laura Palmer is chronicled.Lost Highway (1997)After a bizarre encounter at a party, a jazz saxophonist is framed for the murder of his wife and sent to prison, where he inexplicably morphs into a young mechanic and begins leading a new life.

  • Twin Peaks: Collection [Blu-ray] Twin Peaks: Collection | Blu Ray | (27/06/2016) from £14.99  |  Saving you £4.51 (23.10%)  |  RRP £19.5

    All 30 episodes of David Lynch's landmark murder mystery series. Twin Peaks (population 51,201), a sleepy everytown USA where everyone's lives intersect with everyone else's, lies just five miles from the Canadian border. The town wakes up one morning to find one of its brightest young inhabitants, beautiful Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) murdered and wrapped in plastic down by the river. Local Sheriff Harry S. Truman (Michael Ontkean) and tearful Deputy Andy (Harry Goaz) are out of their depth with such a murder case and an FBI agent is assigned to investigate. Youthful, charismatic and somewhat otherworldy in his approach to policing, Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) arrives to try and solve the case. Cooper's appearance causes ripples in the community and in turn he discovers that Twin Peaks is a small town full of secrets.

  • Dune [1984] Dune | DVD | (04/10/2004) from £5.99  |  Saving you £-2.96 (-49.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    David Lynch's Dune is the brilliant but fatally flawed would-be epic feature film version of Frank Herbert's novel of the same name, the bestselling science fiction novel ever written. It is a complex but too heavily simplified version of a far more elaborate book, a darkly Gothic far future space opera revolving around an imperial, dynastic power struggle on the desert planet of Arrakis. With what was in 1984 an enormous $40 million budget, Lynch retained a surprising amount of the industrial/Victorian feel of his previous features, Eraserhead (1976) and The Elephant Man (1980), and was able to bring to the screen some of the most imaginative and awe-inspiring production designs, costumes and action then seen. Indeed, as a spectacularly atmospheric vision of the future Dune has as much to recommend it as the far more celebrated Blade Runner (1982), with which it even shares the female romantic lead, Sean Young--here just one star in a superb cast. The problem, which an unauthorised extended TV version failed to fix, is that Lynch's original vision of Dune was massively cut for length, and as such the final third is so rapidly paced as to undermine the superb first two thirds. A director's cut is sorely needed, the cinema version playing like a butchered masterpiece. Also available is an entirely unconnected four-and-a-half-hour mini-series, Frank Herbert's Dune (2000), which is less visionary but more coherent. On the DVD: The 2.35:1 image suffers from not being anamorphically enhanced. There are minor flecks of dirt and scratches, but generally the print used is in good condition although there is a considerable amount of grain in some scenes and the image could be more detailed. The packaging claims the sound is Dolby Digital 5.1, but it is actually three-channel sound (stereo plus centre speaker), with the main stereo feed being duplicated in the rear channels. A full 5.1 remastering would improve matters considerably. Special features consist of the original trailer and a pointless gallery of seven badly cropped stills. There is a very basic animated and scored menu using the portentous main theme music from the film. --Gary S Dalkin

  • Twin Peaks Twin Peaks | DVD | (05/11/2002) from £6.89  |  Saving you £43.10 (86.20%)  |  RRP £49.99

    One of the most influential TV shows of the 1990s, the first series of Twin Peaks has lost none of its quirky and queasy power to get under your skin and haunt your dreams. Without its groundbreaking mix of convoluted plotting, complex character interactions, surreal fantasy sequences and a continuous story arc, we would probably not have had The X-Files, The Sopranos, Six Feet Under or even The League of Gentlemen. So brew up a pot of some "damn fine coffee", dig into some cherry pie, and lose yourself in David Lynch and Mark Frost's murder mystery-soap opera, which unfolds, in one character's words, "like a beautiful dream and terrible nightmare all at once". Twin Peaks was a pop culture phenomenon, for this first series at least, until the increasingly bizarre twists and maddening teases so confounded audiences that they lost interest in just who killed Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). This series was also a career peak for most of its eclectic ensemble cast, including Kyle MacLachlan as straight-arrow FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper, Michael Ontkean as local Sheriff Harry S Truman, Sherilyn Fenn as bad girl Audrey Horne, Peggy Lipton as waitress Norma Jennings and Catherine Coulson as the Log Lady. On the DVD: Twin Peak, Series 1 comes as a four-disc set that contains the original pilot plus the first season's seven episodes (inexplicably, the pilot episode was omitted on the American Region 1 DVD release, but is reinstated here). Special features include episode introductions by the Log Lady, commentaries by assorted episode directors (but not Lynch), and features from the archives of the fanzine Wrapped in Plastic. The 4:3 picture has been digitally remastered, and is now accompanied by a Dolby 5.1 soundtrack. --Donald Liebenson

  • The Doors [Blu-ray] [1990] The Doors | Blu Ray | (18/04/2011) from £5.49  |  Saving you £19.50 (78.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Dramatic biopic focusing on the progression of one of the most influential rock bands ever; The Doors, as well as the private life of lead singer Jim Morrison and his relationship with his girlfriend Pamela Courson (Meg Ryan). From three time Academy Award Winner Oliver Stone (Platoon, JFK). Extras“Back to the Roots” - An exclusive documentary highlighting the journey of one of the most influential bands in rock and roll history. “Jim Morrison - A Poet In Paris” – The last moments of Jim Morrison in Paris

  • Dune--Special TV Edition [1984] Dune--Special TV Edition | DVD | (23/10/2000) from £5.50  |  Saving you £9.56 (47.80%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Dune: Special TV Edition is an extended US network television version prepared in 1988 from David Lynch's 1984 film of Frank Herbert's classic science fiction novel, Dune. The original cinema release of this complex tale of interplanetary intrigue was heavily shortened and this 176-minute TV edition should not to be confused with Lynch's still unreleased three-hour-plus "Director's Cut". In fact Lynch disowned this TV version, replacing his director's credit with the infamous pseudonym Alan Smithee and his screenplay credit with the name Judas Booth (a combination of two notorious traitors). What the network did was add 35 minutes, about 15 minutes in the first two thirds, which in the cinema cut is in any case superbly paced, and around 20 into the final 40. This latter material does help balance the frenetic rush of the cinema cut, restoring important scenes such as Paul Atreides' fight with Jamis, a Fremen funeral and Jessica Atreides' taking the "Water of Life". What primarily alienated Lynch was the imposition of a folksy, sometimes laughable narration, as well as the replacement of the original prologue with a far longer sequence explaining the Dune universe via pre-production paintings. This TV edit is a travesty of what, in the "Director's Cut" at least, is probably a great film, and is really only worth seeing to get a glimpse of the material Lynch was forced to remove. The unconnected mini-series, Frank Herbert's Dune (2000) does a far better job of telling a more complete version of the story. On the DVD: There is a fold-out colour booklet which contains a wealth of stills, a reproduction of the original cinema poster and a worthwhile essay on the original film that avoids any discussion of the TV version it accompanies. On the disc there is only the original theatrical trailer. The superb cinematography is ruined by the panned and scanned 4:3 image, which is grainy and has poor colour fidelity. It is also soft, lacking detail and washed-out, probably a result of being converted from American NTSC TV format video rather than coming directly from an original film print. Certainly the DVD of the cinema version looks far better. The audio is thin mono, completely failing to do justice to how fantastic a post-Star Wars 40-million-dollar science fiction epic should sound. --Gary S Dalkin

  • The Doors - Special Edition [1991] The Doors - Special Edition | DVD | (17/02/2003) from £8.61  |  Saving you £11.38 (56.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Doors is Oliver Stone's epic, typically portentous homage to the band that soundtracked his youth. As is generally the case with Stone's films, its scope is impressively wide. He places The Doors at the eye of a 1960s cultural and political maelstrom through which passes Andy Warhol, Martin Luther King Jr and Robert Kennedy among others. But the details and dialogue often jar badly: the scenes in which various gilded youths imbibe the young Jim Morrison's early efforts at lyrics as if they were anything beyond dreadful sophomoric doggerel are a particular strain on the credulity. The film's central conceit--that Morrison's body was somehow inhabited at an early age by the spirit of a Navajo medicine man--makes the deranged conspiracies of JFK seem plausible by comparison. The Doors is redeemed by Stone's ability with ambitious set-pieces (the concert scenes are terrific) and a tremendous performance from Val Kilmer, who plays Jim Morrison as a pompous, self-regarding oaf who treats bandmates, friends and women appallingly. While this may well have been the case it is debatable whether Stone intended to show his hero in such an unflattering light: the closing scenes in Pere Lachaise cemetery, which linger over the graves of Wilde, Molière and Flaubert before arriving at Morrison's witlessly vandalised plot, certainly suggest a belief on Stone's part that the author of the ridiculous "American Prayer" has earned a place in the literary pantheon. This film fails to make a convincing case for that but, like Morrison's own work, is a compelling, cautionary illustration of what a supremely ordinary singer and songwriter is allowed to get away with if he looks good in leather trousers. On the DVD: The Doors Special Edition has the benefit of a bewildering array of special features, though many are less impressive than their billing: the "Behind the Scenes" documentary is eight minutes of apparently random footage of the film being made, and the making-of documentary isn't much more illuminating. The interviews with the cast are also on the desultory side. There is a conventional scene selector and another that allows the viewer to choose from the songs that appear in the soundtrack. There are also several sound options and subtitles. Most useful of all is the illuminating and engaging running commentary by Oliver Stone. --Andrew Mueller

  • Twin Peaks: Season 2 (UK Version) [DVD] Twin Peaks: Season 2 (UK Version) | DVD | (22/03/2010) from £7.09  |  Saving you £42.90 (85.80%)  |  RRP £49.99

    "Don't search for all the answers at once," says a giant appearing to FBI Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) in a vision. "A path is formed by laying one stone at a time." In Twin Peaks, that's easier said than done. Over the course of two seasons, that path went nowhere and everywhere. "Bureau guidelines, deductive technique, Tibetan method, and luck" don't cut it here. It also takes a little magic, which is what makes David Lynch and Mark Frost's bracingly original serial drama one of TV's ultimate trips, and still the stuff that fever dreams are made of. With the DVD release of season 2, die-hard Peakers can rekindle their obsession with this macabre, maddening, sinister, and surreal series set in the rural Pacific Northwest community whose bucolic surroundings hide "things dark and heinous." (If you're new to Twin Peaks, best to get the lay of the land by watching the brilliant feature-length pilot and the instant-cult-classic first season, which capture Twin at its peak.) Three main mysteries drive season 2. First, there's the still (!) unresolved murder of Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). Then, there's the question of who shot Cooper in the season 1 cliffhanger. And finally, ultimately: What about Bob? With its dream logic, bizarre behavior, and nightmare imagery, much of what transpires goes right by you. Some subplots (Sherilyn Fenn's sexpot Audrey held captive at the bordello, One-Eyed Jacks) are easier to latch on to than others (amnesiac Nadine believes she's an 18-year-old high schooler) And, yes, that's a pre-X-Files David Duchovny as Dennis/Denice, a transsexual DEA agent. In Twin Peaks' second season, the truth is out there, but we are entering A Few Good Men territory. When Laura's killer is at last revealed in episode 16, no doubt many will not be able to handle the truth. The teases, red herrings, and out-and-out gonzo looniness will try the patience of viewers with a more conventional bent. But, as Cooper observes at one point, "All in all, [it's] a very interesting experience," with enough doppelgangers, allusions, pop-culture references, and in-jokes to keep bloggers buzzing. If, for example, you get any pleasure from recognizing Hank Worden, who played Mose in The Searchers, as "the world's most decrepit room service waiter," then Twin Peaks may just make you feel right at home. --Donald Liebenson

  • Showgirls [Blu-ray] [2017] Showgirls | Blu Ray | (11/12/2017) from £8.25  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Paul Verhoeven's attempt to couple the softcore sex film with the Hollywood musical stars Elizabeth Berkley as a Las Vegas stripper who lap-dances her way to the city's most prestigious chorus line. Vying with the show's established star for the leading role in a new erotic spectacular, Berkley gives the director (Kyle MacLachlan) a close-up demonstration of what she can do. Dave Stewart of Eurythmics provides the music for the steamy dance routines.

  • Showgirls [1996] Showgirls | DVD | (30/06/2003) from £4.49  |  Saving you £1.50 (25.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

    When Goldie Hawn recommended Elizabeth Berkley for a small role in First Wives Club, she publicly stated that Berkley deserved the opportunity to redeem herself after starring in the ridiculous Showgirls. That says it all: this sleazy, stupid movie, which mixes soft pornography with the clichés of backstage dramas, is the kind of project an aspiring actress would have to put well behind her to keep a career going (though co-star Gina Gershon certainly benefited from her, uh, exposure in the film). Berkley plays a drifter who hitches a ride to Las Vegas, becomes a lap dancer and then a performer, and discovers--gasp!--there's a whole world of sex and violence involved with these things. Gershon is probably the best element in the film, playing Berkley's bisexual rival for the big spotlight on stage. Joe Eszterhas was well overpaid for writing this howler, and director Paul Verhoeven (Basic Instinct) should have known better than to take it seriously. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • The Doors [1990] The Doors | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £7.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (38.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Oliver Stone give us his take on the life of rock star Jim Morrison whose life came tragically to an end in a haze of drug abuse. The movie captures the psychedelic atmosphere of the Doors work and particularly Jim Morrison's life - who is played by a very convincing Val Kilmer.

  • Roswell [DVD] Roswell | DVD | (26/03/2012) from £7.69  |  Saving you £7.20 (48.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Based on real-life events, the mystery of the Roswell UFO and its passengers is as compelling as it is controversial. New Mexico, 1947. Mac Brazel finds unidentifiable wreckage scattered across his farmland. Intelligence officer Jesse Marcel is summoned from the nearby Roswell Air Force base and sensationally declares the debris is from a crashed UFO. But no sooner has the story broken than it's silenced by the Pentagon. And so begins one of the greatest mysteries of modern times. DVD features: The UFO Chronicles Factual accounts and theories of many major UFO events of the century Stills Gallery

  • Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series (Ltd Edition Packaging) [Blu-ray] [Region Free] Twin Peaks: A Limited Event Series (Ltd Edition Packaging) | Blu Ray | (04/12/2017) from £29.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A quarter century after revolutionizing television, Twin Peaks returns. Expanding the world you thought you knew, this limited event series takes you places wonderful, strange and farther out. This Blu-ray collection includes all 18 parts of the Showtime series, plus a wealth of exclusive, behind-the-scenes special features that will show you what's behind the red curtain and the making of this extraordinary television event. Features: Series Promos Twin Peaks: Phenomenon (Featurettes) Comic-Con 2017: Twin Peaks Panel A Very Lovely Dream: One Week in Twin Peaks Richard Beymer Films Rancho Rosa Logos Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery The Man with the Gray Elevated Hair Tell It Martin Two Blue Balls The Number of Completion Bad Binoculars See You On The Other Side Dear Friend Do Not Pick Up Hitchhikers A Bloody Finger In Your Mouth The Polish Accountant A Pot of Boiling Oil

  • Blue Velvet [1986] Blue Velvet | DVD | (04/10/2004) from £4.79  |  Saving you £-1.37 (-22.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    David Lynch peeks behind the picket fences of small-town America to reveal a corrupt shadow world of malevolence, sadism and madness. From the opening shots Lynch turns the Technicolor picture postcard images of middle-class homes and tree-lined lanes into a dreamy vision on the edge of nightmare. After his father collapses in a preternaturally eerie sequence, college boy Kyle MacLachlan returns home and stumbles across a severed human ear in a vacant lot. With the help of sweetly innocent high school girl (Laura Dern), he turns junior detective and uncovers a frightening yet darkly compelling world of voyeurism and sex. Drawn deeper into the brutal world of drug dealer and blackmailer Frank, played with raving mania by an obscenity-shouting Dennis Hopper in a career-reviving performance, he loses his innocence and his moral bearings when confronted with pure, unexplainable evil. Isabella Rossellini is terrifyingly desperate as Hopper's sexual slave who becomes MacLachlan's illicit lover, and Dean Stockwell purrs through his role as Hopper's oh-so-suave buddy. Lynch strips his surreally mundane sets to a ghostly austerity, which composer Angelo Badalamenti encourages with the smooth, spooky strains of a lush score. Blue Velvet is a disturbing film that delves into the darkest reaches of psycho-sexual brutality and simply isn't for everyone. But for a viewer who wants to see the cinematic world rocked off its foundations, David Lynch delivers a nightmarish masterpiece. --Sean Axmaker

  • Hamlet [2000] Hamlet | DVD | (03/02/2003) from £12.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £9.99

    As an entry in the Shakespeare-redone-as-teen-movie stakes, Hamlet has a less obvious hook than most. Though the gloomy prince--played by Ethan Hawke as a 20-something clinging to student status because he can't cope with the grown-up world of power politics--is a youth identification figure, the political background, translated into a big business concern with Old Hamlet as the CEO of the Denmark Corporation, is beyond the gangland simplicities of Romeo and Juliet or the high school pecking order of 10 Things I Hate About You. Michael Almereyda, after two interesting horror movies (Nadja and The Eternal), offers what he calls "a rough draft" of the play, and casts very fine players in a severely abbreviated text: the micro-presence of some (Jeffrey Wright as the grave-digger) suggests a longer version was prepared and slimmed down to this quite tight picture. The actors manage a middle ground between the original and the new context: Sam Shepard's Ghost lingers silently beyond his stage appearances to emphasise the textual theme that Old Hamlet was a sinning villain who deserves his limbo; Kyle MacLachlan's Claudius is smooth, but conscience-struck in the back of his limo after viewing Hamlet's cut-up underground film allegorising the murder; Diane Venora's Gertrude is a radical reading that plays well, drinking the poison on purpose to save her son and at once innocent of her husband's murder but genuinely committed to Claudius's rule; Bill Murray, Liev Schrieber and Julia Stiles make a good unit as Polonius, Laertes and Ophelia respectively, though the text-pruning (and especially Stiles's vulnerable mad child) turns them into victims of a selfish Hamlet rather than culpable collaborators with the something rotten in Denmark. Hawke's prince is the sketchiest reading but his knitted hat and messy student workstation make sense and he is a credible post-adolescent ditherer. This Hamlet, who has to be convinced of his uncle's guilt and that he ought to take revenge, never quite comes round to the brutal eye-for-an-eye logic of his father. The settings are steely hotel ballrooms (the coronation is translated to a press conference) and other inventively co-opted New York locales: Ophelia drowns in a huge lobby fountain, her mad scene is at a reception in the Guggenheim, the "to be or not to be" speech is delivered in the aisles of Blockbuster Video (as Hamlet prowls the Action section). Deliberately imperfect but far more interesting (and exciting) than the recent Mel Gibson and Kenneth Branagh embalmings of the play, this is a rare and welcome Hamlet that sets out to be an addition to the debate rather than a definitive reading. --Kim Newman

  • The Trial [1992] The Trial | DVD | (04/03/2002) from £2.82  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £3.99

    An adaptation by Harold Pinter of Franz Kafka's classic novel about one man's paranoia and persecution. Josef K. for no reason he can imagine is suddenly arrested. As he wanders through a maze of bureaucracy declaring his innocence he becomes more and more entangled in the system -- and he puts himself in ever greater danger. And no matter what he does he can't make the nightmare end.

  • Blue Velvet [1986] Blue Velvet | DVD | (23/10/2000) from £7.73  |  Saving you £-1.74 (-29.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Possibly the most influential American film of the 1980's Lynch's bizarre erotic mystery spawned a whole raft of imitations with its portrayal of the dark underside of American small-town life. Critics and audiences responded to Lynch's original and startling images of sex and violence and made the film a box-office smash. Blue Velvet is renowned for creating in Dennis Hopper's Frank one of the greatest screen villains of all time.

Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us