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Stanley Holloway

  • My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration [Blu-ray] [1964] My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration | Blu Ray | (11/07/2016) from £8.00  |  Saving you £11.99 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    More lovely than ever! Restored in 4K from 8K scans of original 65 mm elements with 96K resolution English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD audio, this 50th ANNIVERSARY EDITION celebrates the breathtaking musical extravaganza that won 8 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. This beloved adaptation of the Broadway stage hit stars AUDREY HEPBURN as Eliza Doolittle, a sassy, working-class London street vendor, and REX HARRISON as the elitist Professor Higgins, who attempts to turn Eliza into a sophisticated lady through proper tutoring. But, when the humble flower girl blossoms into the toast of London society, her teacher may have a lesson or two to learn himself

  • The Sandwich Man [1966] The Sandwich Man | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £6.99  |  Saving you £6.00 (46.20%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Performed mostly in mime this comical tale relates the daily life of a Sandwich Man and his encounters with many of his very eccentric acquaintances.

  • Brief Encounter [1945] Brief Encounter | DVD | (15/09/2008) from £4.75  |  Saving you £8.24 (63.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Noel Coward's sensitive portrayal of what happens when two happily married strangers played by Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson meet and their acquaintance deepens into affection and eventually into love. It is the story of two people thrown together by the chance meeting of the title helpless in the face of their emotions but redeemed by their moral courage. Over the years few films have equalled the compassion and the realism of Brief Encounter.

  • The Way Ahead [1944] The Way Ahead | DVD | (17/05/2004) from £4.49  |  Saving you £5.50 (55.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Originally intended as a training film this war story (based on a screenplay by Eric Ambler and Peter Ustinov) tells of the light-hearted tomfoolery which soon gives way to the grim realities of life on the most dangerous battlegrounds of the Second World War...

  • The Titfield Thunderbolt [DVD] The Titfield Thunderbolt | DVD | (14/01/2013) from £8.48  |  Saving you £7.51 (47.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A comical and delightful tale of community spirit, written by celebrated Ealing regular and Academy Award Winner T.E.B. Clarke (The Lavender Hill Mob, Barnacle Bill), directed by Charles Crichton (A Fish Called Wanda, The Lavender Hill Mob) and celebrating its 60th Anniversary, The Titfield Thunderbolt has been expertly digitally restored from the much loved, Golden Age of the Ealing Comedies. When British Railways announce the closure of the Titfield to Mallingford branch line, a group of local village residents make a bid to run it themselves, backed by a monied member of the community who is attracted by the complete lack of licensing hours on trains. Unfortunately this puts them into direct competition with the local bus company. Special Features: Making the Titfield Thunderbolt Douglas Slocombe Home Movie Footage The Lion Locomotive Featurette Locations Feaurette Stills Gallery Restoration Comparison Douglas Slocombe on Charles Crichton Audio Interview Trailer

  • Ealing Comedy DVD Collection - The Ladykillers/Kind Hearts and Coronets/The Lavender Hill Mob/The Man in the White Suit [1955] Ealing Comedy DVD Collection - The Ladykillers/Kind Hearts and Coronets/The Lavender Hill Mob/The Man in the White Suit | DVD | (02/09/2002) from £29.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Four of the British film industry's best-loved comedies in one box set makes The Ealing Comedy Collection absolutely essential for anyone who has any passion at all for movies. The set contains Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Man in the White Suit (1951) and The Ladykillers (1955). Ealing's greatest comedies captured the essence of post-war Britain, both in their evocation of a land once blighted by war but now rising doggedly and optimistically again from the ashes, and in their mordant yet graceful humour. They portray a country with an antiquated class system whose crumbling conventions are being undermined by a new spirit of individual opportunism. In the delightfully wicked Kind Hearts and Coronets, a serial killer politely murders his way into the peerage; in The Lavender Hill Mob a put-upon bank clerk schemes to rob his employers; The Man in the White Suit is a harshly satirical depiction of idealism crushed by the status quo; while The Ladykillers mocks both the criminals and the authorities with its unlikely octogenarian heroine Mrs "lop-sided" Wilberforce. Many factors contribute to the success of these films--including fine music scores from composers such as Benjamin Frankel (Man in the White Suit) and Tristram Cary (The Ladykillers); positively symphonic sound effects (White Suit); marvellously evocative locations (the environs of King's Cross in Ladykillers, for example); and writing that always displays Ealing's unique perspective on British social mores ("All the exuberance of Chaucer without, happily, any of the concomitant crudities of his period")--yet arguably their greatest asset is Alec Guinness, whose multifaceted performances are the keystone upon which Ealing built its biting, often macabre, yet always elegant comedy. On the DVD: The Ealing Comedy Collection presents the four discs in a fold-out package with postcards of the original poster artwork for each. Aside from theatrical trailers on each disc there are no extra features, which is a pity given the importance of these films. The Ladykillers is in muted Technicolor and presented in 1.66:1 ratio, the three earlier films are all black and white 1.33:1. Sound is perfectly adequate mono throughout. --Mark Walker

  • This Happy Breed [1944] This Happy Breed | DVD | (26/01/2009) from £10.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (31.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    This Happy Breed (2 Discs)

  • The Best Of Ealing Collection [DVD] The Best Of Ealing Collection | DVD | (03/11/2014) from £15.00  |  Saving you £19.99 (57.10%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Details TBC

  • Brief Encounter [Blu-ray] [1945] Brief Encounter | Blu Ray | (02/02/2009) from £6.29  |  Saving you £13.70 (68.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Noel Coward's sensitive portrayal of what happens when two happily married strangers played by Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson meet and their acquaintance deepens into affection and eventually into love. It is the story of two people thrown together by the chance meeting of the title helpless in the face of their emotions but redeemed by their moral courage. Over the years few films have equalled the compassion and the realism of Brief Encounter.

  • The Definitive Ealing Studios Collection The Definitive Ealing Studios Collection | DVD | (16/10/2006) from £40.00  |  Saving you £79.99 (66.70%)  |  RRP £119.99

    A box set featuring 16 of the finest efforts from the house of Ealing. 1. Champagne Charlie (Dir. Alberto Cavalcanti 1944) 2. Dead of Night (Dirs. Alberto Cavalcanti & Charles Crichton 1945) 3. Hue & Cry (Dir. Charles Crichton 1947) 4. It Always Rains on Sunday (Dir. Robert Hamer 1947) 5. Kind Hearts and Coronets (Dir. Robert Hamer 1949) 6. The Ladykillers (Dir. Alexander Mackendrick 1955) 7. The Lavender Hill Mob (Dir. Charles Crichton 1951) 8. The Maggie (Dir. Alexander Mackendrick 1954) 9. The Magnet (Dir. Charles Frend 1950) 10. The Man in The White Suit (Dir. Alexander Mackendrick 1951) 11. Nicholas Nickelby (Dir. Alberto Cavalcanti 1947) 12. Passport To Pimlico (Dir. Henry Cornelius 1949) 13. Scott of The Antarctic (Dir. Charles Frend 1948) 14. The Titfield Thunderbolt (Dir. Charles Crichton 1953) 15. Went The Day Well? (Dir. Alberto Cavalcanti 1942) 16. Whisky Galore (Dir. Alexander Mackendrick 1949)

  • No Trees in the Street [DVD] No Trees in the Street | DVD | (16/03/2015) from £5.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (40.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Sylvia Syms and Herbert Lom star in this hard-hitting drama set in the slums of pre-war London. Directed by Oscar nominee J. Lee-Thompson and adapted by Dixon of Dock Green creator Ted Willis from his own play No Trees in the Street earned BAFTA nominations for Best British Actress for Syms and Best British Screenplay for Willis. It is presented here in a brand-new digital transfer from original film elements in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Encouraged by his mother Jess Tommy opts to earn money the easy way by working for Wilkie a local racketeer who preys on the families of Kennedy Street; Jess also tries to force daughter Hetty to marry Wilkie. Unable to bear her squalid existence any longer Hetty tries to leave home... Bonus Features: Original theatrical trailer Image gallery Promotional material PDFs

  • Brief Encounter [1945] Brief Encounter | DVD | (26/09/2008) from £14.98  |  Saving you £1.01 (6.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Expanded from a one-act stage play by Noel Coward, Brief Encounter is without doubt one of the true masterpieces of British film history. The story seems slight--a respectable suburban housewife has a chance meeting with a handsome married doctor, their friendship becomes romance, but they feel the pressures of convention pulling their relationship apart--but the writing, acting and direction are sublime, turning what might have been just another melodrama into a memorable and heartbreaking story of impossible love. David Lean went on to make much bigger films than this, but few of those epics packed the emotional punch of this picture, set in a mundane world of railway stations, semi-detached houses and inexpensive cafes. Trevor Howard is perfectly cast as Alec, the doctor, but the film belongs above all to Celia Johnson, as the heroine Laura. It's easy to mock her clipped ultra-English accent, but she gives one of the greatest screen performances imaginable, brilliantly evoking how an ordinary life can be turned upside down by unexpected passion. Throw in the superb use of Rachmaninov's swooning Second Piano Concerto, shrewd supporting acting from Cyril Raymond, Joyce Carey and Everley Gregg, and some of the best black-and-white photography of its era, and the result is irresistible. Anyone who isn't besotted with Brief Encounter has either never been in love, or doesn't deserve to be. --Andy Medhurst

  • The Best Of Ealing Collection [DVD] The Best Of Ealing Collection | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £14.99  |  Saving you £18.00 (51.40%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Titles Comprise: Kind Hearts And Coronets: Set in the stately Edwardian era Kind Hearts And Coronets is black comedy at is best with the most articulate and literate of all Ealing screenplays. Sir Alec Guinness gives a virtuoso performance in his Ealing comedy debut playing all eight victims standing between a mass-murderer and his family fortune. Considered by some to be Ealing's most perfect achievement of all the Ealing films. The Ladykillers director Alexander Mackendrick's third Ealing farce is the final comedy produced by the famous British studio and one of its most celebrated. Like the equally applauded Kind Hearts And Coronets the film is more sophisticated and blacker in tone than typically lighthearted Ealing fare (such as Mackendrick's Whiskey Galore!). Alec Guinness stars as the superbly shifty toothily threatening Professor Marcus the leader of a crime ring planning a heist. Marcus rents rooms from a sweet eccentric old lady Mrs. Wilberforce (Katie Johnson) in her crooked London house. The professor and his co-conspirators blowhard Major Courtney (Cecil Parker) creepily suave Louis (Herbert Lom) chubby Harry (Peter Sellers) and muscleman One-Round (Danny Green) pose as an unlikely string quartet using the rooms for rehearsal. Dodging Mrs. Wilberforce's constant interruptions the hoods hit upon the idea to use her in the daring daylight robbery (filmed in and around London's King's Cross station). When the old girl discovers the truth Marcus and company cannot persuade her to stay buttoned up about it and thus decide to do her in. Accompanied by a noirish cacophony of screeching trains parrots and little old ladies at afternoon tea a series of unlikely events builds to the hilarious surprising finale. The Man In The White Suit: Sidney Stratton (Alec Guinness) works quietly at Michael Corland's (Michael Gough) textile mill until his mysterious costly lab experiment is discovered. Fired by Corland Stratton takes a menial job at Alan Birnley's (Cecil Parker) mill in order to continue his work on the sly. When Daphne (Joan Greenwood) Corland's fianc''e and Birnley's daughter discovers his secret she threatens to expose Stratton. The desperate scientist reveals to Daphne that he has invented an indestructible cloth that never gets dirty. Close to realizing his vision Stratton celebrates by having a white suit made of the fabric (because it repels dye). The trouble however is just beginning. The lowly mill workers (who spout market economics in rough accents) fear for their jobs while the mill owners led by the decrepit Godfather-esque Sir John Kierlaw (Ernest Thesiger) worry about their profits. Passport To Pimlico: An archaic document found in a bombsite reveals that the London district of Pimlico has for centuries technically been part of France. The local residents embrace their new found continental status seeing it as a way to avoid the drabness austerity and rationing of post-war England. The authorities do not however share their enthusiasm... The Lavender Hill Mob: Mr. Holland (Alec Guinness) has supervised the bank's bullion run for years. He is fussy and unnecessarily overprotective but everyone knows he is absolutely trustworthy. And so on the day the bullion truck is robbed he is the last person to be suspected. But there is another side to Mr. Holland; he is also Dutch the leader of the Lavender Hill Mob.

  • My Fair Lady [1964] My Fair Lady | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £6.85  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £16.99

    Hollywood's legendary "woman's director", George Cukor (The Women, The Philadelphia Story), transformed Audrey Hepburn into street-urchin-turned-proper-lady Eliza Doolittle in this film version of the Lerner and Loewe musical. Based on George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, My Fair Lady stars Rex Harrison as linguist Henry Higgins (Harrison also played the role, opposite Julie Andrews, on stage), who draws Eliza into a social experiment that works almost too well. The letterbox edition of this film on video certainly pays tribute to the pageantry of Cukor's set, but it also underscores a certain visual stiffness that can slow viewer enthusiasm just a tad. But it's really star wattage that keeps My Fair Lady exciting--that and such great songs as "On the Street Where You Live" and "I Could Have Danced All Night". Actor Jeremy Brett, who gained a huge following later in life portraying Sherlock Holmes, is quite electric as Eliza's determined suitor. --Tom Keogh

  • My Fair Lady [DVD] [1964] My Fair Lady | DVD | (14/09/2009) from £7.15  |  Saving you £5.84 (45.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Audrey Hepburn stars as Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl who under the guidance of Professor Higgins played by Rex Harrison becomes the Belle of British Society. Winner of 8 Academy Awards including Best Picture and blessed with an array of scintillating songs this classic movie is a feast for both the eyes and the ears and is breathtaking entertainment for the whole family.

  • Champagne Charlie [1944] Champagne Charlie | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £4.09  |  Saving you £8.90 (68.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The life and highly entertaining times of 19th century English music hall performer George Leybourne (aka Champagne Charlie) and his rivalry with the Great Vance (Stanley Holloway)... A thoroughly enjoyable but sadly neglected musical comedy from the Ealing Studio.

  • No Love For Johnnie [DVD] No Love For Johnnie | DVD | (05/09/2011) from £6.49  |  Saving you £6.50 (50.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    First time on DVD! Re-elected to the House of Commons, Labour Party member Johnnie Byrne suffers two setbacks: he fails to receive a Cabinet post, and his wife, a Communist, leaves him. The professional failure disturbs Johnnie and he is persuaded to join a left-wing splinter group bent on harassing the prime minister. One evening, Johnnie's neighbour, who is in love with him, takes him to a party where he meets model Pauline. After a few dates, Johnnie is desperately in love with her and fails to appear in Parliament on the day he is scheduled to ask a crucial question to discredit the government. Pauline, decides that marrying a man twice her age is too great a risk, and leaves London. Johnnie is then summoned to a meeting of his constituents who attack him for his neglect. Failing to win back Pauline, Johnnie receives a surprise offer from his wife suggesting they try again. Johnnie is inclined to accept her offer, but the prime minister offers him a Cabinet post with the stipulation that he remain apart from his Communist wife, Johnnie decides against the reconciliation. Alone and without love or friends, he occupies one of the front seats reserved for Cabinet members. Is it all really worth it? Based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Wilfred FienburghPeter Finch won Best British Actor BAFTA in 1962.

  • The Titfield Thunderbolt [1952] The Titfield Thunderbolt | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £7.96  |  Saving you £5.03 (38.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    When an antiquated railway line is threatened with closure the villagers decide to run it themselves and enter into frenzied competition with the local bus route with hilarious consequences! Director Charles Crichton and writer Tibby Clarke team up again for the first Ealing comedy to be produced in Technicolor. The defiance of authority by local inhabitants was a favourite topic in the 40's and 50's and embellishes the characteristic Ealing theme - 'small is beautiful and big is bad'.

  • The Lavender Hill Mob (60th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray] The Lavender Hill Mob (60th Anniversary Edition) | Blu Ray | (01/08/2011) from £11.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (40.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Directed by Charles Crichton, who would much later direct John Cleese in A Fish Called Wanda (1988), 1951's The Lavender Hill Mob is the most ruefully thrilling of the Ealing Comedies. Alec Guinness plays a bowler-hatted escort of bullion to the refineries. His seeming timidity, weak 'r's and punctiliousness mask a typically Guinness-like patient cunning. "I was aware I was widiculed but that was pwecisely the effect I was stwiving to achieve". He's actually plotting a heist. With more conventionally cockney villains Sid James and Alfie Bass in tow, as well as the respectable but ruined Stanley Holloway, Guinness' perfect criminal plan works in exquisite detail, then unravels just as exquisitely, culminating in a nail-biting police car chase in which you can't help rooting for the villains. The Lavender Hill Mob depicts a London still up to its knees in rubble from World War II, a world of new hope but continued austerity, a budding new order in which everything seems up for grabs; as such it could be regarded as a lighter hearted cinematic cousin to Carol Reed's 1949 masterpiece The Third Man. The Lavender Hill Mob also sees the first, fleeting on-screen appearance of Audrey Hepburn in the opening sequence. --David Stubbs

  • The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection - Volume 9 [DVD] The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection - Volume 9 | DVD | (20/01/2014) from £8.29  |  Saving you £6.70 (44.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    A global byword for cinematic quality of a quintessentially British nature, Ealing Studios made more than 150 films over a three decade period. A cherished and significant part of British film history, only selected films from both the Ealing and Associated Talking Pictures strands have previously been made available on home video format - with some remaining unseen since their original theatrical release. The Ealing Rarities Collection redresses this imbalance - featuring new transfers from...

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