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  • Lord Of The Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Version) [Blu-ray] [2001] Lord Of The Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Version) | Blu Ray | (06/04/2010) from £9.49  |  Saving you £65.50 (87.30%)  |  RRP £74.99

    This spectacular trilogy - based on J.R.R. Tolkien's phenomenally successful epic novel - is comprised of three of the most successful and critically acclaimed movies ever made. Now available to buy for the first time in eye-popping high definition this is the one box set to rule them all! Finally for the first time all three original theatrical versions of The Lord Of The Rings come alive in high definition Blu-ray! See the epic trilogy the way it was meant to be seen with the complete box set containing The Fellowship Of The Ring The Two Towers and The Return Of The King! The Lord of the Rings Trilogy tells the story of Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) a hobbit who battles against the Dark Lord Sauron to save his world Middle-earth from the grip of evil. In the films Frodo and his fellowship of friends and allies embark on a desperate journey to rid Middle-earth of the source of Sauron's greatest strength the One Ring -- a ring that has the power to enslave the inhabitants of Middle-earth. The trilogy tells tales of extraordinary adventures across the treacherous landscape of Middle-earth and reveals how the power of friendship love and courage can hold the forces of darkness at bay. Beside Wood the films star Ian McKellen Liv Tyler Viggo Mortensen Sean Astin Cate Blanchett John Rhys-Davies Billy Boyd Dominic Monaghan Orlando Bloom Christopher Lee Hugo Weaving featuring Sean Bean and Ian Holm with Andy Serkis as Gollum. The films also star Marton Csokas Craig Parker and Lawrence Makaoare. The Lord Of The Rings - The Fellowship Of The Ring: In a time before history in a place called Middle-earth a dark and powerful lord has brought together the forces of evil to destroy its cultures and enslave all life caught in his path. Sauron's time has come and he needs only one small object - a Ring that has been lost for centuries - to snuff out the light of civilization and cover the world in darkness... The Lord Of The Rings - The Two Towers: The fellowship is now divided with Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Gimli (John-Rhys Davies) helping to restore some order to the land of King Theodon (Bernard Hill) whose mind has been poisoned by the machinations of Grima Wormtongue (Brad Dourif). Wormtongue is a secret emissary of wizard Saruman (Christopher Lee) now ready to unleash his army of the night on Middle-Earth. Meanwhile Frodo (Elijah Wood) is falling deeper under the dreaded influence of The Ring as he journeys with Sam (Sean Astin) towards Mordor... The Lord Of The Rings - The Return Of The King: The remnants of the Fellowship marshal their forces for one final attack as Hobbits Sam (Astin) and Frodo (Wood) are led by Gollum to Mount Doom in the hope of destroying the One Ring forever...

  • The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy [DVD] The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy | DVD | (16/11/2015) from £10.99  |  Saving you £22.00 (66.70%)  |  RRP £32.99

    The Quest Is Over: All 3 Extended Versions in Dazzling 1080p and DTS HD-MA 6.1 Audio. Deluxe 15-Disc Set Includes 9 Special Features DVDs with over 26 Hours of Spellbinding Behind-the-Moviemaking Material Including the Rare Costa Botes Documentaries. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING EXTENDED EDITION With the help of a courageous fellowship of friends and allies, Frodo embarks on a perilous mission to destroy the legendary One Ring. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS EXTENDED EDITION In the middle chapter of this historic movie trilogy, the Fellowship is broken but its quest to destroy the One Ring continues. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING EXTENDED EDITION The final battle for Middle-earth begins. Frodo and Sam, led by Gollum, continue their dangerous mission toward the fires of Mount Doom in order to destroy the One Ring.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) [2004] The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) | DVD | (10/12/2004) from £6.09  |  Saving you £29.90 (83.10%)  |  RRP £35.99

    The greatest trilogy in film history, presented in the most ambitious sets in DVD history, comes to a grand conclusion with the extended edition of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. Not only is the third and final installment of Peter Jackson's adaptation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien the longest of the three, but a full 50 minutes of new material pushes the running time to a whopping 4 hours and 10 minutes. The new scenes are welcome, and the bonus features maintain the high bar set by the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. What's New? One of the scenes cut from the theatrical release but included here, the resolution of the Saruman storyline, generated a lot of publicity when the movie opened, as actor Christopher Lee complained in the press about losing his only appearance. It's an excellent scene, one Jackson calls "pure Tolkien," and provides better context for Pippin to find the wizard's palantir in the water, but it's not critical to the film. In fact, "valuable but not critical" might sum up the ROTK extended edition. It's evident that Jackson made the right cuts for the theatrical run, but the extra material provides depth and ties up a number of loose ends, and for those sorry to see the trilogy end (and who isn't?) it's a welcome chance to spend another hour in Middle-earth. Some choice moments are Gandalf's (Ian McKellen) confrontation with the Witch King (we find out what happened to the wizard's staff), the chilling Mouth of Sauron at the gates of Mordor, and Frodo (Elijah Wood) and Sam (Sean Astin) being mistaken for Orc soldiers. We get to see more of Éowyn (Miranda Otto), both with Aragorn and on the battlefield, even fighting the hideously deformed Orc lieutenant, Gothmog. We also see her in one of the most anticipated new scenes, the Houses of Healing after the battle of the Pelennor Fields. It doesn't present Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) as a savior as the book did, but it shows the initial meeting between Éowyn and Faramir (David Wenham), a relationship that received only a meaningful glance in the theatrical cut. If you want to completely immerse yourself in Peter Jackson's marvelous and massive achievement, only the extended edition will do. And for those who complained, no, there are no new endings, not even the scouring of the Shire, which many fans were hoping to see. Nor is there a scene of Denethor (John Noble) with the palantir, which would have better explained both his foresight and his madness. As Jackson notes, when cuts are made, the secondary characters are the first to go, so there is a new scene of Aragorn finding the palantir in Denethor's robes. Another big difference is Aragorn's confrontation with the King of the Dead. In the theatrical version, we didn't know whether the King had accepted Aragorn's offer when the pirate ships pulled into the harbor; here Jackson assumes that viewers have already experienced that tension, and instead has the army of the dead join the battle in an earlier scene (an extended cameo for Jackson). One can debate which is more effective, but that's why the film is available in both versions. If you feel like watching the relatively shorter version you saw in the theaters, you can. If you want to completely immerse yourself in Peter Jackson's marvelous and massive achievement, only the extended edition will do. How Are the Bonus Features? To complete the experience, The Return of the King provides the same sprawling set of features as the previous extended editions: four commentary tracks, sharp picture and thrilling sound, and two discs of excellent documentary material far superior to the recycled material in the theatrical edition. Those who have listened to the seven hours of commentary for the first two extended editions may wonder if they need to hear more, but there was no commentary for the earlier ROTK DVD, so it's still entertaining to hear him break down the film (he says the beacon scene is one of his favorites), discuss differences from the book, point out cameos, and poke fun at himself and the extended-edition concept ("So this is the complete full strangulation, never seen before, here exclusively on DVD!"). The documentaries (some lasting 30 minutes or longer) are of their usual outstanding quality, and there's a riveting storyboard/animatic sequence of the climactic scene, which includes a one-on-one battle between Aragorn and Sauron. One DVD Set to Rule Them All Peter Jackson's trilogy has set the standard for fantasy films by adapting the Holy Grail of fantasy stories with a combination of fidelity to the original source and his own vision, supplemented by outstanding writing, near-perfect casting, glorious special effects, and evocative New Zealand locales. The extended editions without exception have set the standard for the DVD medium by providing a richer film experience that pulls the three films together and further embraces Tolkien's world, a reference-quality home theater experience, and generous, intelligent, and engrossing bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) [2002] The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) | DVD | (18/11/2003) from £7.89  |  Saving you £12.10 (60.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    With significant extra footage and a multitude of worthwhile bonus features this extended version of The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is as colossal an achievement as its predecessor, The Fellowship of the Ring. There are valuable additions to the story, including two new scenes which might appease those who feel that the characterisation of Faramir was the film's most egregious departure from the book; fans will also appreciate an appearance of the Huorns at Helm's Deep plus a nod to the absence of Tom Bombadil. Seeing a little more interplay between the gorgeous Eowyn and Aragorn is welcome, as is a grim introduction to Eomer and Theoden's son. And among the many other additions, there's an extended epilogue that might not have worked in cinemas, but is more effective here in setting up The Return of the King. While the 30 minutes added to The Fellowship of the Ring felt just right in enriching the film, the extra footage in The Two Towers at times seems a bit extraneous--we see moments that in the theatrical version we had been told about, and some fleshed-out conversations and incidents are rather minor. But director Peter Jackson's vision of JRR Tolkien's world is so marvellous that it's hard to complain about any extra time we can spend there. While it may seem that there would be nothing left to say after the bevy of features on the extended Fellowship, the four commentary tracks and two discs of supplements on The Two Towers remain informative, fascinating, and funny, far surpassing the recycled materials on the two-disc theatrical version. Highlights of the 6.5 hours' worth of documentaries offer insight on the stunts, the design work, the locations and the creation of Gollum and--most intriguing for avid fans--the film's writers (including Jackson) discuss why they created events that weren't in the book. Providing variety are animatics, rough footage, countless sketches and a sound-mixing demonstration. Again, the most interesting commentary tracks are by Jackson and writers Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens and by 16 members of the cast (eight of whom didn't appear in the first film, and even including John Noble, whose Denethor character only appears in this extended cut). The first two instalments of Peter Jackson's trilogy have established themselves as the best fantasy films of all time, and among the best film trilogies of all time, and their extended-edition DVD sets have set a new standard for expanding on the already epic films and providing comprehensive bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Extended Edition Box Set) The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Extended Edition Box Set) | DVD | (10/12/2004) from £22.49  |  Saving you £42.50 (65.40%)  |  RRP £64.99

    The extended editions of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings present the greatest trilogy in film history in the most ambitious sets in DVD history. In bringing J.R.R. Tolkien's nearly unfilmable work to the screen, Jackson benefited from extraordinary special effects, evocative New Zealand locales, and an exceptionally well-chosen cast, but most of all from his own adaptation with co-writers Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, preserving Tolkien's vision and often his very words, but also making logical changes to accommodate the medium of film. While purists complained about these changes and about characters and scenes left out of the films, the almost two additional hours of material in the extended editions (about 11 hours total) help appease them by delving more deeply into Tolkien's music, the characters, and loose ends that enrich the story, such as an explanation of the Faramir-Denethor relationship, and the appearance of the Mouth of Sauron at the gates of Mordor. In addition, the extended editions offer more bridge material between the films, further confirming that the trilogy is really one long film presented in three pieces (which is why it's the greatest trilogy ever--there's no weak link). The scene of Galadriel's gifts to the Fellowship added to the first film proves significant over the course of the story, while the new Faramir scene at the end of the second film helps set up the third and the new Saruman scene at the beginning of the third film helps conclude the plot of the second. To top it all off, the extended editions offer four discs per film: two for the longer movie, plus four commentary tracks and stupendous DTS 6.1 ES sound; and two for the bonus material, which covers just about everything from script creation to special effects. The argument was that fans would need both versions because the bonus material is completely different, but the features on the theatrical releases are so vastly inferior that the only reason a fan would need them would be if they wanted to watch the shorter versions they saw in theaters (the last of which, The Return of the King, merely won 12 Oscars). The LOTR extended editions without exception have set the DVD standard by providing a richer film experience that pulls the three films together and further embraces Tolkien's world, a reference-quality home theater experience, and generous, intelligent, and engrossing bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • Captain Fantastic [DVD] Captain Fantastic | DVD | (23/01/2017) from £7.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, isolated from society, a devoted father (Viggo Mortensen) dedicates his life to transforming his six young children into extraordinary adults. But when a tragedy strikes the family, they are forced to leave this self-created paradise and begin a journey into the outside world that challenges his idea of what it means to be a parent and brings into question everything he's taught them.

  • Captain Fantastic [Blu-ray] Captain Fantastic | Blu Ray | (23/01/2017) from £9.74  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, isolated from society, a devoted father (Viggo Mortensen) dedicates his life to transforming his six young children into extraordinary adults. But when a tragedy strikes the family, they are forced to leave this self-created paradise and begin a journey into the outside world that challenges his idea of what it means to be a parent and brings into question everything he's taught them.

  • The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Edition Box Set) The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Edition Box Set) | DVD | (30/08/2005) from £6.65  |  Saving you £18.34 (73.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    This six-disc box set contains the three theatrical-release versions of The Lord of the Rings trilogy--that is, the films as they were originally seen in cinemas. The individual titles are all also available as separate two-disc sets: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King.

  • A Dangerous Method [DVD] A Dangerous Method | DVD | (25/06/2012) from £4.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    On the eve of World War I, Zurich and Vienna are the setting for a dark tale of sexual and intellectual discovery. Drawn from true-life events, A Dangerous Method takes a glimpse into the turbulent relationships between fledgling psychiatrist Carl Jung, his mentor Sigmund Freud and Sabina Spielrein, the troubled but beautiful young woman who comes between them. Into the mix comes Otto Gross, a debauched patient who is determined to push the boundaries. In this exploration of sensuality, ambition and deceit set the scene for the pivotal moment when Jung, Freud and Sabina come together and split apart, forever changing the face of modern thought. A Dangerous Method was directed by David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises, A History of Violence, Crash) from a screenplay by Academy Award® winning writer Christopher Hampton (Atonement, Dangerous Liaisons), who adapted his own stage play The Talking Cure for the screen. Academy Award® nominee Keira Knightley (Never Let Me Go, Atonement, Pride and Prejudice) stars as Sabina Spielrein opposite fast-rising star Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds, Fish Tank, Hunger and the upcoming Jane Eyre, X-Men: First Class and Prometheus) as Carl Jung, with Academy Award® nominee Viggo Mortensen (Eastern Promises, A History of Violence, Lord of the Rings trilogy) as Sigmund Freud. Vincent Cassel (Black Swan, Mesrine) plays Otto Gross, and Canadian newcomer Sarah Gadon plays Jung?s wife Emma.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) [Blu-ray] [2002] The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) | Blu Ray | (03/12/2012) from £14.08  |  Saving you £10.91 (43.70%)  |  RRP £24.99

    In the second film of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, the breathtaking adventure continues. The Fellowship is broken, but its quest to destroy the One Ring continues. Winner of two Academy Awards.

  • A Perfect Murder [1998] A Perfect Murder | DVD | (19/04/1999) from £3.09  |  Saving you £10.18 (72.80%)  |  RRP £13.99

    The husband (Michael Douglas) is a currency trader whose portfolio value is going right down the drain. The wife (Gwyneth Paltrow) is the heiress to a $100 million fortune. The marriage is not a happy one, but the promise of long-term affluence keeps them together. The wife pursues an affair with an artist (Viggo Mortenson) who gives her all the passion she doesn't get at home, and when the husband finds out, well ... someone's going to pay with their life. Who will the unlucky one be? We wouldn't dare spoil the elegant plot twists of this devious thriller, but it's well known that Douglas excels at portraying greedy characters with ice in their veins. Here, it's easy to assume that Douglas has pulled off, as the title implies, a killing that nobody will ever pin on him. But this is the kind of glossy thriller (loosely inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder) that delights in disrupting your expectations, so it grabs your attention right up to the final scene. It's a bit too cold really to draw you in but with its able cast and stylish direction by Andrew Davis, this less-than-perfect murder thriller is still definitely worth a look. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) [Blu-ray] [2003] The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) | Blu Ray | (03/12/2012) from £9.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The final battle for Middle-earth begins. Frodo and Sam, led by Gollum, continue their dangerous mission toward the fires of Mount Doom in order to destroy the One Ring. Aragorn struggles to fulfill his legacy as he leads his outnumbered followers against the growing power of the Dark Lord Sauron, so that the Ring-bearer may complete his quest.

  • Crimson Tide [1995] Crimson Tide | DVD | (06/11/2006) from £4.39  |  Saving you £13.60 (75.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    No-nonsense combat veteran Captain Frank Ramsey (Hackman) and his newly instated first officer Ron Hunter (Washington) are caught in the middle of a global crisis. On board a nuclear submarine they're heading for Russia where radical nationalists are threatening to start World War III. But when they receive an unverified message to launch their missiles Ramsey and Hunter clash over the validity of the orders.

  • The Road [Blu-ray] [2009] The Road | Blu Ray | (17/05/2010) from £6.85  |  Saving you £13.14 (65.70%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Post apocalyptic tale based on the bestselling novel by Cormac McCarthy (No Country For Old Men). A father and son travel on foot through a devastated American landscape battling both starvation and cannibals.

  • G.I. Jane [1997] G.I. Jane | DVD | (26/03/2001) from £4.69  |  Saving you £8.30 (63.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    It seemed like a pretty good career move, and for the most part it was. Demi Moore will never top any rational list of great actresses, but as her career stalled in the mid-1990s she had enough internal fire and external physicality to be just right for her title role in G.I. Jane. Her character's name isn't Jane--it's Jordan O'Neil--but the fact that she lacks a penis makes her an immediate standout in her elite training squad of Navy SEALs. She's been recruited as the first female SEAL trainee through a series of backroom political manoeuvres and must prove her military staying power against formidable odds--not the least of which is the abuse of a tyrannical master chief (Viggo Mortensen) who puts her through hell to improve her chances of success. Within the limitations of a glossy star vehicle, director Ridley Scott manages to incorporate the women-in-military issue with considerable impact, and Moore--along with her conspicuous breast enhancements and that memorable head-shaving scene--jumps into the role with everything she's got. Not a great movie by any means, but definitely a rousing crowd pleaser and it's worth watching just to hear Demi shout the words "Suck my ----!!" (rhymes with "chick"). --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Daylight [1996] Daylight | DVD | (02/05/2005) from £4.09  |  Saving you £5.80 (58.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    This echo of 1970s disaster films stars Sylvester Stallone as the disgraced former head of New York City's Emergency Medical Services, a loser who is nevertheless a compulsive rescuer of people in danger. When the Holland Tunnel is sealed off after a fiery explosion and car passengers are trapped within, he goes inside and leads a group of survivors (a mixed group allegorically representing America's diversity) through all manner of pestilence toward safety. Directed by the imaginative Rob Cohen (Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story), Daylight finds Stallone outrageously (and to almost campy effect) pushing the envelope of his martyr persona to near-religious levels. He throws himself, quite literally, into this part and between that entertainment factor and the unnervingly convincing effects, this is a pretty watchable film.--Tom Keogh

  • Eastern Promises [2007] Eastern Promises | DVD | (25/02/2008) from £5.59  |  Saving you £14.40 (72.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The film follows the mysterious and ruthless Nikolai (Viggo Mortensen) who is tied to one of London's most notorious organized crime families. His carefully maintained existence is jarred when he crosses paths with Anna (Naomi Watts) an innocent midwife who accidentally uncovers potential evidence against the family. Now Nikolai must put into motion a harrowing chain of murder deceit and retribution.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) [2002] The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) | DVD | (26/08/2003) from £3.89  |  Saving you £11.10 (74.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    With The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, the focus of Tolkien's epic story moves from the fantastic to the mythic, from magic and monsters towards men and their deeds, as the expanding panorama of Middle-earth introduces us to the Viking-like Riders of Rohan and the men of Gondor. Which is not to say that Peter Jackson's three-hour second instalment doesn't have its fair share of amazing new creatures--here we meet Wargs, Oliphaunts and winged Nazgul, to name three--just that the film is concerned more with myth-making on a heroic scale than the wide-eyed wonder of The Fellowship of the Ring. There's no time for recapitulation, as a host of new characters are introduced in rapid succession. In Rohan we meet the initially moribund King Theoden (Bernard Hill); his treacherous advisor Grima Wormtongue (Brad Dourif); his feisty niece Eowyn (Miranda Otto); and his strong-willed nephew Eomer (Karl Urban). Faramir (David Wenham), brother of Boromir, is the other principal human addition to the cast. The hobbits, though, encounter the two most remarkable new characters, both of whom are digitally generated: in Fangorn Forest, Merry and Pippin are literally carried away by Treebeard, a dignified old Ent; while Frodo and Sam capture the duplicitous Gollum, whose fate is inextricably intertwined with that of the Ring. The film stands or falls with Gollum. If the characterisation had gone the way of Jar Jar Binks, The Two Towers would have been ruined, notwithstanding all the spectacle and grandeur of the rest. But Gollum is a triumph, a tribute both to the computer animators and the motion-captured performance of Andy Serkis: his "dialogues", delivered theatre-like direct to the audience, are a masterstroke. Here and elsewhere Jackson is unafraid to make changes to the story line, bringing Frodo and Sam to Osgiliath, for example, or tipping Aragorn over a cliff. Yet the director's deft touch always seems to add not detract from Tolkien's vision. Just three among many examples: Aragorn's poignant dreams of Arwen (Liv Tyler); Gimli's comic repartee even in the heat of battle; and the wickedly effective siege weapons of the Uruk-Hai (which signify both Saruman's mastery and his perversion of technology). The climactic confrontation at Helm's Deep contains images the like of which have simply never been seen on film before. Almost unimaginably, there's so much more still to come in the Return of the King. On the DVD: The Two Towers two-disc set, like the Fellowship before it, features the theatrical version of the movie on the first disc, in glorious 2.35:1 widescreen, accompanied by Dolby 5.1 or Dolby Stereo sound options. As before, commentaries and the really in-depth features are held back for the extended four-disc version. Such as they are, all the extras are reserved for Disc Two. The 14-minute documentary On the Set is a run-of-the-mill publicity preview for the movie; more substantial is the 43-minute Return to Middle-Earth, another promotional feature, which at least has plenty of input from cast and crew. Much more interesting are the briefer pieces, notably: Sean Astin's charming silent short The Long and the Short of It, plus an amusing making-of featurette; a teaser trailer for the extended DVD release; and a tantalising 12-minute sneak peek at Return of the King, introduced by Peter Jackson, in which he declares nonchalantly that "Helm's Deep was just an opening skirmish"! --Mark Walker

  • The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King [DVD] The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King | DVD | (16/11/2015) from £5.49  |  Saving you £14.50 (72.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The final battle for Middle-earth begins. Frodo and Sam, led by Gollum, continue their dangerous mission toward the fires of Mount Doom in order to destroy the One Ring. Aragorn struggles to fulfill his legacy as he leads his outnumbered followers against the growing power of the Dark Lord Sauron, so that the Ring-bearer may complete his quest.

  • A History of Violence A History of Violence | DVD | (20/03/2006) from £3.49  |  Saving you £16.50 (82.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Everyone has something to hide. Loosly based on the graphic novel by John Wagner and Vince Locke A History Of Violence is the latest film from Canadian auteur David Cronenburg . Tom Stall is a loving family man and a well respected citizen of a small Indiana town. But when two savage criminals show up at his diner Tom is forced to take action and thwart the robbery attempt. Suddenly heralded as a hero who took the courage to stand up to crime people look up to Tom

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