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Viggo Mortensen: List of Movies, Films and TV Shows

  • Lord Of The Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Version) [Blu-ray] [2001] Lord Of The Rings Trilogy (Theatrical Version) | Blu Ray | (06/04/2010) from £9.49  |  Saving you £65.50 (87.30%)  |  RRP £74.99

    This spectacular trilogy - based on J.R.R. Tolkien's phenomenally successful epic novel - is comprised of three of the most successful and critically acclaimed movies ever made. Now available to buy for the first time in eye-popping high definition this is the one box set to rule them all! Finally for the first time all three original theatrical versions of The Lord Of The Rings come alive in high definition Blu-ray! See the epic trilogy the way it was meant to be seen with the complete box set containing The Fellowship Of The Ring The Two Towers and The Return Of The King! The Lord of the Rings Trilogy tells the story of Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) a hobbit who battles against the Dark Lord Sauron to save his world Middle-earth from the grip of evil. In the films Frodo and his fellowship of friends and allies embark on a desperate journey to rid Middle-earth of the source of Sauron's greatest strength the One Ring -- a ring that has the power to enslave the inhabitants of Middle-earth. The trilogy tells tales of extraordinary adventures across the treacherous landscape of Middle-earth and reveals how the power of friendship love and courage can hold the forces of darkness at bay. Beside Wood the films star Ian McKellen Liv Tyler Viggo Mortensen Sean Astin Cate Blanchett John Rhys-Davies Billy Boyd Dominic Monaghan Orlando Bloom Christopher Lee Hugo Weaving featuring Sean Bean and Ian Holm with Andy Serkis as Gollum. The films also star Marton Csokas Craig Parker and Lawrence Makaoare. The Lord Of The Rings - The Fellowship Of The Ring: In a time before history in a place called Middle-earth a dark and powerful lord has brought together the forces of evil to destroy its cultures and enslave all life caught in his path. Sauron's time has come and he needs only one small object - a Ring that has been lost for centuries - to snuff out the light of civilization and cover the world in darkness... The Lord Of The Rings - The Two Towers: The fellowship is now divided with Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Gimli (John-Rhys Davies) helping to restore some order to the land of King Theodon (Bernard Hill) whose mind has been poisoned by the machinations of Grima Wormtongue (Brad Dourif). Wormtongue is a secret emissary of wizard Saruman (Christopher Lee) now ready to unleash his army of the night on Middle-Earth. Meanwhile Frodo (Elijah Wood) is falling deeper under the dreaded influence of The Ring as he journeys with Sam (Sean Astin) towards Mordor... The Lord Of The Rings - The Return Of The King: The remnants of the Fellowship marshal their forces for one final attack as Hobbits Sam (Astin) and Frodo (Wood) are led by Gollum to Mount Doom in the hope of destroying the One Ring forever...

  • The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy [DVD] The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy | DVD | (16/11/2015) from £11.45  |  Saving you £0.55 (4.60%)  |  RRP £12

    The Quest Is Over: All 3 Extended Versions in Dazzling 1080p and DTS HD-MA 6.1 Audio. Deluxe 15-Disc Set Includes 9 Special Features DVDs with over 26 Hours of Spellbinding Behind-the-Moviemaking Material Including the Rare Costa Botes Documentaries. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING EXTENDED EDITION With the help of a courageous fellowship of friends and allies, Frodo embarks on a perilous mission to destroy the legendary One Ring. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS EXTENDED EDITION In the middle chapter of this historic movie trilogy, the Fellowship is broken but its quest to destroy the One Ring continues. THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING EXTENDED EDITION The final battle for Middle-earth begins. Frodo and Sam, led by Gollum, continue their dangerous mission toward the fires of Mount Doom in order to destroy the One Ring.

  • Hidalgo [2004] Hidalgo | DVD | (30/08/2004) from £4.39  |  Saving you £10.60 (70.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Director Joe Johnston has always had an entertaining sense of adventure, and with Hidalgo he proves it in spades. It's yet another underrated film for Johnston (along with such enjoyable popcorn flicks as The Rocketeer and Jurassic Park III), dismissed by many critics but a welcome treat for anyone drawn to good ol'-fashioned movie excitement. In his first role since playing Aragorn in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Viggo Mortensen brings handsome appeal to his low-key portrayal of Frank T. Hopkins, a real-life long-distance horse racer who, as the movie opens, has witnessed the appalling massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in 1890. Drifting into Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, he agrees to compete, with his trusty mustang, Hidalgo, in "The Ocean of Fire," a treacherous 3,000-mile horse race across the Arabian desert. Toss in a bunch of conspiring competitors, a noble sheik (Omar Sharif), his lovely daughter (Zuleikha Robinson), and enough fast-paced danger to fill 133 minutes, and you've got a rousing, humorous, and lightly spiritual adventure that's a lot of fun to watch. It hardly matters that it's almost pure fiction (the real Hopkins was known by many as "a pathological liar"). More important is the love of movies and moviemaking that Johnston so delightfully conveys. --Jeff Shannon

  • Captain Fantastic [DVD] Captain Fantastic | DVD | (23/01/2017) from £5.89  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, isolated from society, a devoted father (Viggo Mortensen) dedicates his life to transforming his six young children into extraordinary adults. But when a tragedy strikes the family, they are forced to leave this self-created paradise and begin a journey into the outside world that challenges his idea of what it means to be a parent and brings into question everything he's taught them.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) [Blu-ray] [2003] The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) | Blu Ray | (03/12/2012) from £14.98  |  Saving you £9.10 (36.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The final battle for Middle-earth begins. Frodo and Sam, led by Gollum, continue their dangerous mission toward the fires of Mount Doom in order to destroy the One Ring. Aragorn struggles to fulfill his legacy as he leads his outnumbered followers against the growing power of the Dark Lord Sauron, so that the Ring-bearer may complete his quest.

  • The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Extended Edition Box Set) The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (Extended Edition Box Set) | DVD | (10/12/2004) from £22.49  |  Saving you £42.50 (65.40%)  |  RRP £64.99

    The extended editions of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings present the greatest trilogy in film history in the most ambitious sets in DVD history. In bringing J.R.R. Tolkien's nearly unfilmable work to the screen, Jackson benefited from extraordinary special effects, evocative New Zealand locales, and an exceptionally well-chosen cast, but most of all from his own adaptation with co-writers Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, preserving Tolkien's vision and often his very words, but also making logical changes to accommodate the medium of film. While purists complained about these changes and about characters and scenes left out of the films, the almost two additional hours of material in the extended editions (about 11 hours total) help appease them by delving more deeply into Tolkien's music, the characters, and loose ends that enrich the story, such as an explanation of the Faramir-Denethor relationship, and the appearance of the Mouth of Sauron at the gates of Mordor. In addition, the extended editions offer more bridge material between the films, further confirming that the trilogy is really one long film presented in three pieces (which is why it's the greatest trilogy ever--there's no weak link). The scene of Galadriel's gifts to the Fellowship added to the first film proves significant over the course of the story, while the new Faramir scene at the end of the second film helps set up the third and the new Saruman scene at the beginning of the third film helps conclude the plot of the second. To top it all off, the extended editions offer four discs per film: two for the longer movie, plus four commentary tracks and stupendous DTS 6.1 ES sound; and two for the bonus material, which covers just about everything from script creation to special effects. The argument was that fans would need both versions because the bonus material is completely different, but the features on the theatrical releases are so vastly inferior that the only reason a fan would need them would be if they wanted to watch the shorter versions they saw in theaters (the last of which, The Return of the King, merely won 12 Oscars). The LOTR extended editions without exception have set the DVD standard by providing a richer film experience that pulls the three films together and further embraces Tolkien's world, a reference-quality home theater experience, and generous, intelligent, and engrossing bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • Daylight [1996] Daylight | DVD | (02/05/2005) from £4.49  |  Saving you £5.50 (55.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    This echo of 1970s disaster films stars Sylvester Stallone as the disgraced former head of New York City's Emergency Medical Services, a loser who is nevertheless a compulsive rescuer of people in danger. When the Holland Tunnel is sealed off after a fiery explosion and car passengers are trapped within, he goes inside and leads a group of survivors (a mixed group allegorically representing America's diversity) through all manner of pestilence toward safety. Directed by the imaginative Rob Cohen (Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story), Daylight finds Stallone outrageously (and to almost campy effect) pushing the envelope of his martyr persona to near-religious levels. He throws himself, quite literally, into this part and between that entertainment factor and the unnervingly convincing effects, this is a pretty watchable film.--Tom Keogh

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) [2001] The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) | DVD | (06/08/2002) from £4.74  |  Saving you £10.25 (68.40%)  |  RRP £14.99

    A marvellously sympathetic yet spectacularly cinematic treatment of the first part of Tolkien’s trilogy, Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is the film that finally showed how extraordinary digital effects could be used to support story and characters, not simply overwhelm them. Both long-time fantasy fans and newcomers alike were simultaneously amazed, astonished and left agog for parts two and three. Jackson’s abiding love for the source material comes across in the wealth of incidental detail (the stone trolls from The Hobbit, Bilbo’s hand-drawn maps); and even when he deviates from the book he does so for sound dramatic reasons (the interminable Tom Bombadil interlude is deleted; Arwen not Glorfindel rescues Frodo at the ford). New Zealand stands in wonderfully for Middle-Earth and his cast are almost ideal, headed by Elijah Wood as a suitably naïve Frodo, though one with plenty of iron resolve, and Ian McKellen as an avuncular-yet-grimly determined Gandalf. The set-piece battle sequences have both an epic grandeur and a visceral, bloody immediacy: the Orcs, and Saruman’s Uruk-Hai in particular, are no mere cannon-fodder, but tough and terrifying adversaries. Tolkien’s legacy could hardly have been better served. On the DVD: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring two-disc set presents the original theatrical release (approx 171 minutes) on the first disc with a vivid Dolby 5.1 soundtrack and a simply splendid anamorphic print that allows even the darkest recesses of Moria to be glimpsed. The second disc contains 15 short behind-the-scenes pieces originally seen on the official Web site plus three substantial featurettes. The Houghton Mifflin "Welcome to Middle-Earth" is a 16-minute first look at the transition from page to screen, most interesting for its treasurable interview with Tolkien’s original publisher Rayner Unwin. "Quest for the Ring" is a pretty standard 20-minute Fox TV special with lots of cast and crew interviews. Better is the Sci-Fi Channel’s "A Passage to Middle-Earth", a 40-minute special that goes into a lot more detail about many aspects of the production and how the creative team conceived the film’s look. Most mouth-watering for fans who just can’t wait is a 10-minute Two Towers preview, in which Peter Jackson personally tantalises us with behind-the-scenes glimpses of Gollum and Helm’s Deep, plus a tasty three-minute teaser for the four-disc Fellowship special edition. Rounding out a good package are trailers, Enya’s "May It Be" video and a Two Towers video game preview.--Mark Walker

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) [2004] The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Extended Edition) | DVD | (10/12/2004) from £6.09  |  Saving you £29.90 (83.10%)  |  RRP £35.99

    The greatest trilogy in film history, presented in the most ambitious sets in DVD history, comes to a grand conclusion with the extended edition of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. Not only is the third and final installment of Peter Jackson's adaptation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien the longest of the three, but a full 50 minutes of new material pushes the running time to a whopping 4 hours and 10 minutes. The new scenes are welcome, and the bonus features maintain the high bar set by the first two films, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. What's New? One of the scenes cut from the theatrical release but included here, the resolution of the Saruman storyline, generated a lot of publicity when the movie opened, as actor Christopher Lee complained in the press about losing his only appearance. It's an excellent scene, one Jackson calls "pure Tolkien," and provides better context for Pippin to find the wizard's palantir in the water, but it's not critical to the film. In fact, "valuable but not critical" might sum up the ROTK extended edition. It's evident that Jackson made the right cuts for the theatrical run, but the extra material provides depth and ties up a number of loose ends, and for those sorry to see the trilogy end (and who isn't?) it's a welcome chance to spend another hour in Middle-earth. Some choice moments are Gandalf's (Ian McKellen) confrontation with the Witch King (we find out what happened to the wizard's staff), the chilling Mouth of Sauron at the gates of Mordor, and Frodo (Elijah Wood) and Sam (Sean Astin) being mistaken for Orc soldiers. We get to see more of Éowyn (Miranda Otto), both with Aragorn and on the battlefield, even fighting the hideously deformed Orc lieutenant, Gothmog. We also see her in one of the most anticipated new scenes, the Houses of Healing after the battle of the Pelennor Fields. It doesn't present Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) as a savior as the book did, but it shows the initial meeting between Éowyn and Faramir (David Wenham), a relationship that received only a meaningful glance in the theatrical cut. If you want to completely immerse yourself in Peter Jackson's marvelous and massive achievement, only the extended edition will do. And for those who complained, no, there are no new endings, not even the scouring of the Shire, which many fans were hoping to see. Nor is there a scene of Denethor (John Noble) with the palantir, which would have better explained both his foresight and his madness. As Jackson notes, when cuts are made, the secondary characters are the first to go, so there is a new scene of Aragorn finding the palantir in Denethor's robes. Another big difference is Aragorn's confrontation with the King of the Dead. In the theatrical version, we didn't know whether the King had accepted Aragorn's offer when the pirate ships pulled into the harbor; here Jackson assumes that viewers have already experienced that tension, and instead has the army of the dead join the battle in an earlier scene (an extended cameo for Jackson). One can debate which is more effective, but that's why the film is available in both versions. If you feel like watching the relatively shorter version you saw in the theaters, you can. If you want to completely immerse yourself in Peter Jackson's marvelous and massive achievement, only the extended edition will do. How Are the Bonus Features? To complete the experience, The Return of the King provides the same sprawling set of features as the previous extended editions: four commentary tracks, sharp picture and thrilling sound, and two discs of excellent documentary material far superior to the recycled material in the theatrical edition. Those who have listened to the seven hours of commentary for the first two extended editions may wonder if they need to hear more, but there was no commentary for the earlier ROTK DVD, so it's still entertaining to hear him break down the film (he says the beacon scene is one of his favorites), discuss differences from the book, point out cameos, and poke fun at himself and the extended-edition concept ("So this is the complete full strangulation, never seen before, here exclusively on DVD!"). The documentaries (some lasting 30 minutes or longer) are of their usual outstanding quality, and there's a riveting storyboard/animatic sequence of the climactic scene, which includes a one-on-one battle between Aragorn and Sauron. One DVD Set to Rule Them All Peter Jackson's trilogy has set the standard for fantasy films by adapting the Holy Grail of fantasy stories with a combination of fidelity to the original source and his own vision, supplemented by outstanding writing, near-perfect casting, glorious special effects, and evocative New Zealand locales. The extended editions without exception have set the standard for the DVD medium by providing a richer film experience that pulls the three films together and further embraces Tolkien's world, a reference-quality home theater experience, and generous, intelligent, and engrossing bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • History Of Violence [Blu-ray] [2005] History Of Violence | Blu Ray | (02/03/2009) from £4.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (66.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Everyone has something to hide. Loosly based on the graphic novel by John Wagner and Vince Locke A History Of Violence is the latest film from Canadian auteur David Cronenburg . Tom Stall is a loving family man and a well respected citizen of a small Indiana town. But when two savage criminals show up at his diner Tom is forced to take action and thwart the robbery attempt. Suddenly heralded as a hero who took the courage to stand up to crime people look up to Tom as a man of high moral regard. But all that media attention has the likes of mobsters showing up at his doorstep charging that Tom is someone else they've been looking for. Is it a case of mistaken identity or does Tom have a history of violence that no one knows about?

  • G.I. Jane [1997] G.I. Jane | DVD | (26/03/2001) from £4.09  |  Saving you £8.90 (68.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    It seemed like a pretty good career move, and for the most part it was. Demi Moore will never top any rational list of great actresses, but as her career stalled in the mid-1990s she had enough internal fire and external physicality to be just right for her title role in G.I. Jane. Her character's name isn't Jane--it's Jordan O'Neil--but the fact that she lacks a penis makes her an immediate standout in her elite training squad of Navy SEALs. She's been recruited as the first female SEAL trainee through a series of backroom political manoeuvres and must prove her military staying power against formidable odds--not the least of which is the abuse of a tyrannical master chief (Viggo Mortensen) who puts her through hell to improve her chances of success. Within the limitations of a glossy star vehicle, director Ridley Scott manages to incorporate the women-in-military issue with considerable impact, and Moore--along with her conspicuous breast enhancements and that memorable head-shaving scene--jumps into the role with everything she's got. Not a great movie by any means, but definitely a rousing crowd pleaser and it's worth watching just to hear Demi shout the words "Suck my ----!!" (rhymes with "chick"). --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Eastern Promises [Blu-ray] [2007] Eastern Promises | Blu Ray | (25/02/2008) from £6.99  |  Saving you £15.69 (62.80%)  |  RRP £24.98

    The film follows the mysterious and ruthless Nikolai (Viggo Mortensen) who is tied to one of London's most notorious organized crime families. His carefully maintained existence is jarred when he crosses paths with Anna (Naomi Watts) an innocent midwife who accidentally uncovers potential evidence against the family. Now Nikolai must put into motion a harrowing chain of murder deceit and retribution.

  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3 - Leatherface [1990] The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3 - Leatherface | DVD | (26/04/2004) from £3.81  |  Saving you £16.18 (80.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Two friends begin a simple uneventful drive to Florida to deliver a car. But the trip soon becomes a voyage to hell when they hit the backroads of a barren Texas county and meet up with a monstrous serial killer. Through all the gore it's really a comedy...

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) [2003] The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) | DVD | (25/05/2004) from £5.79  |  Saving you £9.20 (61.40%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy, triumphantly completed by the 11-Oscar-winning The Return of the King, sets out to show that Tolkien's epic work, once derided as mere adolescent escapism, is not just fodder for the best mass entertainment spectacle ever seen on the big screen, but is also replete with emotionally satisfying meditations on the human condition. What is the nature of true friendship? What constitutes real courage? Why is it important for us to care about people living beyond our borders? What does it mean to live in harmony with the environment and what are the consequences when we do not? When is war justifiable and when is it not? What things are really worth fighting for? These are the questions that resonate with a contemporary audience: to see our current social and political concerns mirrored--and here finally resolved--in Middle-earth is to recognise that Jackson's Lord of the Rings is both a parable for our times and magical cinematic escapism. As before, in this concluding part of the trilogy the spectacle never dwarfs (sic) the characters, even during Shelob the spider's pitiless assault, for example, or the unparalleled Battle of the Pelennor Fields, where the white towers of Minas Tirith come under ferocious attack from Troll-powered siege weapons and--in a sequence reminiscent of the Imperial Walkers in The Empire Strikes Back--Mammoth-like Mumakil. The people and their feelings always remain in focus, as emphasised by Jackson's sensitive small touches: Gandalf reassuring a terrified Pippin in the midst of battle that death is not to be feared; Frodo's blazing anger at Sam's apparent betrayal; Faramir's desire to win the approval of his megalomaniac father; Gollum's tragic cupidity and his final, heartbreaking glee. And at the very epicentre of the film is the pure heart of Samwise Gamgee--the real hero of the story. At over three hours, there are almost inevitably some lulls, and the film still feels as if some key scenes are missing: a problem doubtless to be rectified in the extended DVD edition. But the end, when it does finally arrive--set to Howard Shore's Wagnerian music score--brings us full circle, leaving the departing audience to wonder if they will ever find within themselves even a fraction of the courage of a hobbit. --Mark Walker

  • Captain Fantastic [Blu-ray] Captain Fantastic | Blu Ray | (23/01/2017) from £8.39  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, isolated from society, a devoted father (Viggo Mortensen) dedicates his life to transforming his six young children into extraordinary adults. But when a tragedy strikes the family, they are forced to leave this self-created paradise and begin a journey into the outside world that challenges his idea of what it means to be a parent and brings into question everything he's taught them.

  • A Perfect Murder [1998] A Perfect Murder | DVD | (19/04/1999) from £3.81  |  Saving you £10.18 (72.80%)  |  RRP £13.99

    The husband (Michael Douglas) is a currency trader whose portfolio value is going right down the drain. The wife (Gwyneth Paltrow) is the heiress to a $100 million fortune. The marriage is not a happy one, but the promise of long-term affluence keeps them together. The wife pursues an affair with an artist (Viggo Mortenson) who gives her all the passion she doesn't get at home, and when the husband finds out, well ... someone's going to pay with their life. Who will the unlucky one be? We wouldn't dare spoil the elegant plot twists of this devious thriller, but it's well known that Douglas excels at portraying greedy characters with ice in their veins. Here, it's easy to assume that Douglas has pulled off, as the title implies, a killing that nobody will ever pin on him. But this is the kind of glossy thriller (loosely inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder) that delights in disrupting your expectations, so it grabs your attention right up to the final scene. It's a bit too cold really to draw you in but with its able cast and stylish direction by Andrew Davis, this less-than-perfect murder thriller is still definitely worth a look. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring - Extended Cut [Blu-ray] [Region Free] The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring - Extended Cut | Blu Ray | (12/05/2014) from £12.87  |  Saving you £0.13 (1.00%)  |  RRP £13

    With the help of a courageous fellowship of friends and allies Frodo embarks on a perilous mission to destroy the legendary One Ring Hunting Frodo are servants of the Dark Lord Sauron reclaims the Ring Middle earth is doomed. Winner of four Academy Awards this epic tale of good versus evil friendship and sacrifice will transport you to a world beyond imagination. Special Features: The Director and Writers: Part 1 The Design Team: Part 1 The Production and Post Production Team: Part 1 The Cast: Part 1 Easter Egg - MTV Movie Award Spoof The Director and Writers: Part 2 The Design Team: Part 2 The Production and Design Team: Part 2 The Cast: Part 2 Easter Egg - Two Towers Sneak Peek Peter Jackson Introduction JRR Tolkien Creator of Middle Earth From Book to Script Storyboards and Pre-Vis: Making Words into Images The Prologue Orc Pursuit into Lothlorien Sarn Gebir Rapids Chase Gandalf Rides to Orthanc The Stairs of Khazad-Dum Storyboard to Film Comparison: Nazgul Attack at Bree Bridge of Khazad Dum Bag End Set Test Designing Middle-Earth Weta Workshop Costume Design Design Galleries with selected Audio Commentary Middle-Earth Atlas Interactive New Zealand as Middle-Earth Interactive Elijah Wood Introduction The Fellowship Cast A Day in the Life of a Hobbit Cameras in Middle Earth Scale Big-atures Weta Digital Editorial: Assembling an Epic Digital Grading The Soundscapes of Middle-Earth Music for Middle-Earth The Road Goes Ever On... Behind the Scenes

  • The Two Faces Of January [DVD] The Two Faces Of January | DVD | (15/09/2014) from £6.59  |  Saving you £13.40 (67.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Based on the novel of the same name by Patricia Highsmith and adapted by Academy Award® nominee Hossein Amini (Drive Snow White And The Huntsman). The Two Faces Of January is a suspense thriller starring Academy Award® nominee Viggo Mortensen (The Lord Of The Rings The Road) Golden Globe nominee and Cannes Best Actress winner Kirsten Dunst (Spider-Man Melancholia) and Oscar Isaac (Drive Inside Llewyn Davis) in a dangerous battle of wits across Greece and Turkey.

  • Jauja [DVD] [2015] Jauja | DVD | (08/06/2015) from £10.00  |  Saving you £7.99 (44.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    A remote military outpost in Patagonia 1882 during the so-called “Conquest of the Desert” a genocidal campaign against the aboriginal population of the region. Acts of savagery abound on all sides. Captain Gunnar Dinesen has come from Denmark with his fifteen year-old daughter to take an engineering job with the argentine army. Being the only female in the area Ingeborg creates quite a stir among the men. She falls in love with a young soldier and one night they run away together. When he wakes up the Captain realises what has happened and decides to venture into enemy territory to find the young couple. “Jauja” is the story of a man’s desperate search for his daughter a solitary quest that takes us to a place beyond time where the past vanishes and the future has no meaning.

  • Psycho [1999] Psycho | DVD | (01/01/1999) from £3.00  |  Saving you £6.99 (70.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Numerous critics had already sharpened their knives even before Gus Van Sant's shot-for-shot colour "re-creation" of the 1960 black-and-white Hitchcock classic was released, chiding the Good Will Hunting director for defiling hallowed ground. But this intriguing cinematic curiosity is hardly as sacrilegious as critics would lead you to believe. If anything, Van Sant doesn't take enough liberties with his almost slavish devotion to the material, now updated with modern references. At times, you wish Van Sant would cut loose with a little spontaneity, a little energy, a little something. Unfortunately, when he does venture outside Hitchcock's parameters--with inserted shots of storm clouds during the murder sequences, for example--it's to little effect. Granted, he liberally splashes colour throughout the film (especially in the case of the infamous shower scene), and this is a great-looking movie, but in his obsession with adding a new physical dimension to the film, there's little insight into these characters that Hitchcock hadn't already provided. Vince Vaughn, a robotic and giggly Norman, doesn't crawl under your skin the way boy-next-door Anthony Perkins did, and Anne Heche is admirable if not very sympathetic in the Janet Leigh role. Van Sant does score a minor coup, though, in his casting of the supporting roles: Julianne Moore provides a welcome shot of energy as Heche's irritable and curious sister, William H. Macy is a perfect small-time detective, Viggo Mortensen is studly enough to make you understand why Heche would want to run away with him, and James LeGros walks away with his one brief scene as a used car salesman. Danny Elfman's gorgeous rerecording of Bernard Herrmann's score is a potent supporting character unto itself. Students and fans of the original film will get a kick out of the modern revisions, but don't expect anything of Hitchcockian calibre; watch it for the sum of its intriguing parts, but not the whole. --Mark Englehart, Amazon.com

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