HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

Classic Films

  • Annie Hall [Blu-ray] [1977] Annie Hall | Blu Ray | (26/08/2013) from £7.59  |  Saving you £5.40 (41.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Annie Hall is one of the truest, most bittersweet romances on film. In it, Allen plays a thinly disguised version of himself: Alvy Singer, a successful--if neurotic--television comedian living in Manhattan. Annie (the wholesomely luminous Dianne Keaton) is a Midwestern transplant who dabbles in photography and sings in small clubs. When the two meet, the sparks are immediate--if repressed. Alone in her apartment for the first time, Alvy and Annie navigate a minefield of self-conscious "is-this-person-someone-I'd-want-to-get-involved-with?" conversation. As they speak, subtitles flash their unspoken thoughts: the likes of "I'm not smart enough for him" and "I sound like a jerk". Despite all their caution, they connect, and we're swept up in the flush of their new romance. Allen's antic sensibility shines here in a series of flashbacks to Alvy's childhood, growing up, quite literally, under a rumbling roller coaster. His boisterous Jewish family's dinner table shares a split screen with the WASP-y Hall's tight-lipped holiday table, one Alvy has joined for the first time. His position as outsider is incontestable when he looks down the table and sizes up Annie's "Grammy Hall" as "a classic Jew-hater".The relationship arcs, as does Annie's growing desire for independence. It quickly becomes clear that the two are on separate tracks, as what was once endearing becomes annoying. Annie Hall embraces Allen's central themes--his love affair with New York (and hatred of Los Angeles), how impossible relationships are, and his fear of death. But their balance is just right, the chemistry between Allen's worry-wart Alvy and Keaton's gangly, loopy Annie is one of the screen's best pairings. It couldn't be more engaging. --Susan Benson

  • A Farewell to Arms [DVD] [1957] A Farewell to Arms | DVD | (05/11/2012) from £5.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    This dense adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's novel features Rock Hudson as American soldier Lt. Henry and his ill-fated love affair with British Nurse Catherine, portrayed by Jennifer Jones, during World War I. The two lovers will stop at nothing to be together but Lt. Henry's internal struggles ultimately threaten the relationship. Hemingway's theme of questioning the nature of war and fighting is fully recognised under Charles Vidor's direction.

  • Secret Agent [1936] Secret Agent | DVD | (07/07/2003) from £9.99  |  Saving you £-13.22 (-189.10%)  |  RRP £6.99

    One of Alfred Hitchcock's finest pre-Hollywood films, the 1936 Secret Agent stars a young John Gielgud as a British spy whose death is faked by his intelligence superiors. Reinvented with a new identity and outfitted with a wife (Madeleine Carroll), Gielgud's character is sent on assignment with a cold-blooded accomplice (Peter Lorre) to assassinate a German agent. En route, the counterfeit couple keeps company with an affable American (Robert Young), who turns out to be more than he seems after the wrong man is murdered by Gielgud and Lorre. Dense with interwoven ideas about false names and real identities, about appearances as lies and the brutality of the hidden, and about the complicity of those who watch the anarchy that others do, Secret Agent declared that Alfred Hitchcock was well along the road to mastery as a filmmaker and, more importantly, knew what it was he wanted to say for the rest of his career. --Tom Keogh

  • Bob Le Flambeur [1955] Bob Le Flambeur | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £4.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (35.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Once a renowned criminal Bob the Gambler now contents himself with gambling frequenting casinos in the shady districts of Paris. He is convinced his gangster days are over - until he meets up with an old accomplice who has news which interests him. The casino at Deauville has a safe which is loaded with several hundred million francs. Short of cash Bob decides to plan one last great robbery. He recruits a number of former fellow criminals and plans the theft to the greatest detail. Unfortunately on the day of the robbery things rapidly begin to go wrong. Bob's luck appears to have taken an unexpected turn - for the better.

  • Films That Define A Decade: '70s [DVD] Films That Define A Decade: '70s | DVD | (22/08/2016) from £4.42  |  Saving you £5.58 (55.80%)  |  RRP £10

    They say the ?60s really happened in the ?70s. Bell-bottoms and disco took over, while films from the ?70s captured the free-spirited movement of the decade in many ways. There was the LA disaster epic Earthquake; pushing all boundaries came the cult classic National Lampoon's Animal House; there was the rip-roaring road trip Smokey and the Bandit; and crime caper The Sting starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

  • Life At The Top [DVD] [1965] Life At The Top | DVD | (24/10/2011) from £3.00  |  Saving you £6.99 (70.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Laurence Harvey turns in an excellent performance in this sequel to the highly successful Room At The Top which follows the life of a social climber whose self-doubt tarnishes his success. With his marriage to the boss' daughter on the rocks, Harvey finds himself embroiled in an affair with a London anchorwoman.

  • Nosferatu (1922) - Two-disc set Nosferatu (1922) - Two-disc set | DVD | (22/01/2001) from £7.98  |  Saving you £2.02 (10.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Nosferatu ... the name alone can chill the blood!". F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu, released in 1922, was the first (albeit unofficial) screen adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Nearly 80 years on, it remains among the most potent and disturbing horror films ever made. The sight of Max Schreck's hollow-eyed, cadaverous vampire rising creakily from his coffin still has the ability to chill the blood. Nor has the film dated. Murnau's elision of sex and disease lends it a surprisingly contemporary resonance. The director and his screenwriter Henrik Gaalen are true to the source material, but where most subsequent screen Draculas (whether Bela Lugosi, Christopher Lee, Frank Langella or Gary Oldman) were portrayed as cultured and aristocratic, Nosferatu is verminous and evil. (Whenever he appears, rats follow in his wake.)The film's full title--Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror)--reveals something of Murnau's intentions. Supremely stylised, it differs from Robert Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1919) or Ernst Lubitsch's films of the period in that it was not shot entirely in the studio. Murnau went out on location in his native Westphalia. As a counterpoint to the nightmarish world inhabited by Nosferatu, he used imagery of hills, clouds, trees and mountains (it is, after all, sunlight that destroys the vampire). It's not hard to spot the similarity between the gangsters in film noir hugging doorways or creeping up staircases with the image of Schreck's diabolic Nosferatu, bathed in shadow, sidling his way toward a new victim. Heavy chiaroscuro, oblique camera angles and jarring close-ups--the devices that crank up the tension in Val Lewton horror movies and edgy, urban thrillers such as Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice--were all to be found first in Murnau's chilling masterpiece. --Geoffrey MacnabOn the DVD: This two-disc set gives you the choice of watching Nosferatu in either a sepia-tinted version or the original black & white. Both, however, feature the same modern electronic music score by Art Zoyd (at the movie's lavish 1922 premiere a live orchestra performed a newly composed, quasi-Wagnerian score by Hans Erdmann). The anonymous commentary track is a scholarly critical appraisal of the movie that exhaustively documents every aspect of it, from Murnau's aesthetic use of framing devices to the homoerotic subtext of the Hutter-Orlock relationship. In the "Nosferatour" featurette the movie's locations (principally, the Baltic cities of Wismer and Lubeck) are shown as they are today, and there is also a look at the original artwork that served as Murnau's inspiration. Two text features provide a brief history of the vampire myth from Vlad the Impaler onwards, as well as a discussion of the controversy caused by the movie's release. Appropriately, a trailer for the John Malkovich-Willem Dafoe movie Shadow of the Vampire, which imagines that "Max Schreck" actually was a vampire employed by Murnau in his obsessive pursuit of verisimilitude, is also included. --Mark Walker

  • Films That Define A Decade: '70s [Blu-ray] Films That Define A Decade: '70s | Blu Ray | (22/08/2016) from £13.28  |  Saving you £-3.69 (-38.50%)  |  RRP £9.59

    They say the ?60s really happened in the ?70s. Bell-bottoms and disco took over, while films from the ?70s captured the free-spirited movement of the decade in many ways. There was the LA disaster epic Earthquake; pushing all boundaries came the cult classic National Lampoon's Animal House; there was the rip-roaring road trip Smokey and the Bandit; and crime caper The Sting starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

  • Hitchcock Classics - The Man Who Knew Too Much / The 39 Steps [1934] Hitchcock Classics - The Man Who Knew Too Much / The 39 Steps | DVD | (29/10/2001) from £11.99  |  Saving you £-15.00 (-100.10%)  |  RRP £14.99

    39 Steps: Alfred Hitchcock considered The 39 Steps to be one of his favourite films partly because it launched his classic theme of the innocent man on the run from villains and lawmen. Robert Donat stars as Richard Hannay in this freely adapted version of John Buchan's story. Despite repeated remakes Hitchcock's riveting original remains unequalled. The Man Who Knew Too Much: A husband and wife's holiday in Switzerland goes horribly wrong when their daughter is kidnapped leading them into a web of mystery and intrigue...

  • Since You Went Away [1944] Since You Went Away | DVD | (31/03/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £4.99

    With her husband Tim off at war Anne Hilton (Colbert) struggles to be a pillar of strength for her daughters Jane (Jones) and Bridget (Temple). During America's darkest hours she bravely steers her girls through heartbreak and hardships as she eagerly awaits news from overseas and wonders if life will ever be the same.

  • This Island Earth [1955] This Island Earth | DVD | (04/02/2008) from £5.00  |  Saving you £4.99 (49.90%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Weird events in the life of atomic scientist Cal Meacham culminate in an invitation from the strange-looking Exeter to work at a secret lab in Georgia supposedly in the cause of world peace. Other scientists are already there including the gorgeous Ruth Adams. They quickly discover there's more to Exeter than meets the eye. Is he benevolent? It may take an interstellar journey to find out.

  • The Apartment [Blu-ray] [1960] The Apartment | Blu Ray | (29/07/2013) from £5.49  |  Saving you £7.50 (57.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Romance at its most anti-romantic--that is the Billy Wilder stamp of genius, and this Best Picture Academy Award winner from 1960 is no exception. Set in a decidedly unsavoury world of corporate climbing and philandering, the great filmmaker's trenchant, witty satire-melodrama takes the office politics of a corporation and plays them out in the apartment of lonely clerk CC Baxter (Jack Lemmon). By lending out his digs to the higher-ups for nightly extramarital flings with their secretaries, Baxter has managed to ascend the business ladder faster than even he imagined. The story turns even uglier, though, when Baxter's crush on the building's melancholy elevator operator (Shirley MacLaine) runs up against her long-standing affair with the big boss (a superbly smarmy Fred MacMurray). The situation comes to a head when she tries to commit suicide in Baxter's apartment. Not the happiest or cleanest of scenarios, and one that earned the famously caustic and cynically humoured Wilder his share of outraged responses, but looking at it now, it is a funny, startlingly clear-eyed vision of urban emptiness and is unfailingly understanding of the crazy decisions our hearts sometimes make. Lemmon and MacLaine are ideally matched and while everyone cites Wilder's Some Like It Hot closing line "Nobody's perfect" as his best, MacLaine's no-nonsense final words--"Shut up and deal"--are every bit as memorable. Wilder won three Oscars for The Apartment, for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay (cowritten with long-time collaborator I A L Diamond). --Robert Abele

  • In a Lonely Place [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [1950] In a Lonely Place | Blu Ray | (16/05/2016) from £15.09  |  Saving you £12.90 (46.10%)  |  RRP £27.99

    One of the classics of the noir psychological thriller, In a Lonely Place is one of Humphrey Bogart's finest performances. He is almost unbearably intense as Dixon Steele, a screenwriter with high standards and a nasty temper who finds himself under suspicion when Mildred, a hat-check girl he knows, is found murdered. Immediately he gets an alibi from a neighbour, Laurel, and equally quickly, he recognises that this is a woman who meets his standards: the question is, as suspicion of his involvement in Mildred's death continues, can he make himself meet hers? This is a wonderful study in trust and suspicion and the limits of love; Bogart's performance is impressive simply because he is prepared to go well over the limits of our sympathy in the name of emotional truth. The scene where he explains imaginatively to a cop and his wife how the murder might have happened is a spine-chilling, creepy portrait of amoral artistic brilliance. Gloria Grahame is equally fine as the woman who lets herself love him, for a while. On the DVD: In a Lonely Place comes with an excellent documentary in which Curtis Hanson (LA Confidential) explains the importance of the film to him and discusses its place in the work of Bogart and the director Nicholas Ray; there is also a quick interesting documentary about the restoration and digitisation of classic films. The film is presented with a visual aspect ratio of 1.33:1 and with restored Dolby Surround sound that does full justice to the film's snappy dialogue and the moody George Antheil score. --Roz Kaveney

  • Shake Hands With The Devil (1959) [DVD] Shake Hands With The Devil (1959) | DVD | (11/06/2012) from £6.25  |  Saving you £3.04 (19.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The daughter of a British official is kidnapped by the IRA. As a hostage she falls in love but is in constant danger. A forceful performance from Cagney in one of his last roles.

  • Rodgers and Hammerstein Box set [Blu-ray] [1945] Rodgers and Hammerstein Box set | Blu Ray | (10/09/2012) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Six all time classic movies form the pens of two of the greatest collaborators in movie history. Titles Comprise:The Sound of MusicThe King and ISouth PacificOklahoma!CarouselState Fair

  • Black Christmas [1974] Black Christmas | DVD | (04/12/2006) from £7.99  |  Saving you £-3.96 (-44.00%)  |  RRP £8.99

    The few remaining residents of a Canadian sorority house are celebrating the onset of Christmas vacation when a thirteen year-old girl is found dead in the park. Soon it is discovered that one of the sorority sisters is missing which triggers a terrifying chain of murders within the house... Director Bob Clark's tense effective film is a precursor to the 'slasher' films Friday 13th and Halloween that would come a half decade later.

  • Will Hay - Boys Will Be Boys [1935] Will Hay - Boys Will Be Boys | DVD | (03/12/2001) from £4.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Prison teacher Dr. Smart-Alec (Will Hay) steps up the career ladder to become headmaster of Narkover public school but his innate stupidity soon begins to create havoc. Will Hay dons a mortarboard on screen for the first time in the bumbling headmaster role that was to become his trademark.

  • This Sporting Life [1963] This Sporting Life | DVD | (31/01/2000) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Prolific British filmmaker Lindsay Anderson weaves this small, evocative tale of young life at the crossroads in early 1960s Northern England. A rough, sullen young man (Richard Harris) working in the local coal mines begins to make a name for himself as a star rugby player, but even as he begins to fall in love he cannot escape the harsh realities of the bleak life around him. The rugby sequences in the film are striking, but no more so than the depiction of downtrodden people living in the shadow of industry and corruption that too often crushes their spirit. Harris in one of his first roles, is remarkably effective as an unlikeable but sympathetic figure trying against hope to savour the small joys life has to offer, and the film also features the debut of renowned actress Glenda Jackson. One of a series of working-class, character-driven British imports, This Sporting Life is one of the best on the field. --Robert Lane

  • Whisky Galore (Single Disc) [1949] Whisky Galore (Single Disc) | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £11.30  |  Saving you £4.69 (29.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A Highland fling on a tight little island! The Scottish islanders of Todday bypass war time rationing and delight in smuggling cases of their favourite tipple from a wrecked ship... Basil Radford stars as the teetotal English official who is totally unable to comprehend the significance of whisky to the islanders. Marvellously detailed and well played it firmly established the richest Ealing vein with the common theme of a small group triumphing over a more powerful opponent.

  • Brighton Rock [1947] Brighton Rock | DVD | (25/09/2006) from £8.71  |  Saving you £7.28 (45.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The elegant and respectable facade of Brighton hides a sinister underworld ruled by intimidation and terror. Richard Attenborough stars as Pinkie a ruthless and sadistic young criminal whose trail of killings and double crossings lead to his eventual downfall when savage justice is finally meted out in a thrilling and memorable climax...

Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us