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Classic Films

  • Finian's Rainbow [1968] Finian's Rainbow | DVD | (16/05/2005) from £8.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Musical morality tale about prejudice directed by Francis Ford Copolla and starring Fred Astaire. Based on a Broadway show from the late 40's. Astaire plays an Irishman who's moved to a small southern town. His plan is to bury a leprechaun's pot of gold that he's brought with him - so that it will grow faster. But his plans go awry when his daughter makes the wrong wish while Astaire stands over the magical pot...

  • Dr. Mabuse, der Spieler. [Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler.] [Masters of Cinema] [Blu-ray] Dr. Mabuse, der Spieler. | Blu Ray | (28/10/2013) from £9.49  |  Saving you £10.50 (52.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    One of the legendary epics of the silent cinema - and the first part of a trilogy that Fritz Lang developed up to the very end of his career - Dr. Mabuse der Spieler. [Dr. Mabuse the Gambler.] is a masterpiece of conspiracy that even as it precedes the mind-blowing Spione from the close of Lang's silent cycle constructs its own dark labyrinth from the base materials of human fear and paranoia. Rudolf Klein-Rogge plays Dr. Mabuse the criminal mastermind whose nefarious machinations provide the cover for - or describe the result of - the economic upheaval and social bacchanalia at the heart of Weimar-era Berlin. Initiated with the arch-villain's diabolical manipulation of the stock-market and passing through a series of dramatic events based around hypnotism charlatanism hallucinations Chinese incantations cold-blooded murder opiate narcosis and cocaine anxiety Lang's film maintains an unrelenting power all the way to the final act... which culminates in the terrifying question: WHERE IS MABUSE?! A bridge between Feuillade's somnambulistic serial-films and modern media-narratives of elusive robber-barons Lang's two-part classic set the template for the director's greatest works: social commentary as superpsychology poised at the brink of combustion. The Masters of Cinema Series is proud to present Lang's early masterpiece in its fully-restored version on Blu-ray in 1080p for the first time ever. Special Features: New officially licensed transfer from restored HD materials New and improved optional English subtitles with original intertitles Exclusive feature-length audio commentary by film-scholar and Lang expert David Kalat Three video pieces: an interview with the composer of the restoration score a discussion of Norbert Jacques creator of Dr. Mabuse and an examination of the film’s motifs in the context of German silent cinema 32-Page Booklet featuring vintage reprints of writing by Lang

  • Saraband For Dead Lovers [1948] Saraband For Dead Lovers | DVD | (07/05/2007) from £9.79  |  Saving you £3.20 (24.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A romance that rocked the thrones of kings. A historical romance of star-crossed lovers set in the days of George I based on the novel by Helen Simpson.

  • How Green Was My Valley [1941] How Green Was My Valley | DVD | (18/02/2002) from £9.99  |  Saving you £-4.74 (-79.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • M (Masters of Cinema) Dual Format (Blu-ray + DVD) M (Masters of Cinema) Dual Format (Blu-ray + DVD) | Blu Ray | (14/11/2011) from £10.69  |  Saving you £9.30 (46.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Of all Fritz Lang’s creations, none have been more innovative or influential than M, the film that launched German cinema into the sound era with stunning sophistication and mesmerising artistry. A spate of child killings has stricken a terrified Berlin. Peter Lorre gives a legendary performance as the murderer Hans Beckert, who soon finds himself chased by all levels of society.From cinema’s first serial killer hunt, Lang pulls back to encompass social tapestry, police procedural, and underworld conspiracies in an astonishingly multi-faceted and level-headed look at a deeply incendiary topic. One of the greatest psychological thrillers of all time, M remains as fresh and startling 80 years on. Special Features: Restored high-definition transfer in the correct 1.19:1 aspect ratio [1080p on Blu-ray] Two audio commentaries: one by German film scholars Anton Kaes and Eric Rentschler; the other featuring film restoration expert Martin Koerber, filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich, historian Torsten Kaiser and excerpts from Bogdanovich’s 1965 interviews with Lang The original 1932 British release version of M, presented in its entirety, recently rediscovered, featuring different actors, alternate takes, and Peter Lorre’s first performance in English, courtesy of the BFI National Archive [1080p on Blu-ray, 93 mins] Zum Beispiel Fritz Lang, a 1968 documentary by Erwin Leiser with Fritz Lang discussing his career in German cinema [480p, 21 minutes] 48-Page Booklet including writing by Fritz Lang, historian Robert Fischer, details of a missing scene, behind-the-scenes stills, and production drawings

  • Carry On Collection Vol.3 Carry On Collection Vol.3 | DVD | (01/09/2008) from £9.79  |  Saving you £3.20 (24.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Titles Comprise: 1. Carry On Spying: Fearless agent Desmond Simpkins and James Bind aided and abetted by the comely Agent Honeybutt and Agent Crump battle against the evil powers of international bad guys STENCH and their three cronies. 2. Carry On Cleo: Ancient British slaves save Caesar (Kenneth Williams) from assassination in Rome 50 B.C. Meanwhile Mark Antony (Sid James) romances Egyptian Empress Cleopatra (Amanda Barrie). Revolting Britons include Kenneth Connor and Charles Hawtrey while Warren Mitchell plays a partner in the slave-trading firm Markus & Spencius. 3. Carry On Screaming: Who is stealing virgins and turning them into shop-window mannequins? What is the meaning of the gigantic hairy finger found at the scene of the latest crime? What clues can the mad professor or his deathly pale and impossibly buxom sister provide to the hopeless Detective Bung? 4. Carry On Cowboy: Sid James is on top form as the Rompo kid an outlaw who shakes up the sleepy residents of Stodge City. Kenneth Williams is the puritanical judge and Jim Dale plays Marshall P. Knutt a hapless plumber mistakenly sent to clean up the town.

  • Trapped [DVD] Trapped | DVD | (24/08/2009) from £6.93  |  Saving you £1.06 (13.30%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Starring Lloyd Bridges Trapped is taut unpretentious film noir directed by Richard Fleischer. The film begins in semi-documentary style explaining the workings of the U.S. Treasury Department and then follows the chain of events set in motion when a forged 20 dollar bill is discovered in California. However it takes a dramatic turn when treasury agents in Washington D.C. recognise the source of the forged bill and travel to a penitentiary in Atlanta to interview forger Tris Stewart (Lloyd Bridges). The agents engineer a fake escape for Stewart so that he can lead them to the source of the forgeries. But Stewart has others ideas and slips his minders.

  • Theorem [Blu-ray] Theorem | Blu Ray | (27/05/2013) from £8.29  |  Saving you £11.70 (58.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Award-winning and controversial 1968 film starring Terence Stamp and Silvana Mangano, and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini (The Decameron, Salo). A handsome, enigmatic stranger (Terence Stamp) arrives at a middle-class household in Milan and seduces each family member, including the maid, leaving the family in crisis. Theorem is visually ravishing and features superb performances from its international cast, and a brilliant soundtrack by Ennio Morricone.

  • They Shoot Horses Don't They? [1969] They Shoot Horses Don't They? | DVD | (13/10/2008) from £5.39  |  Saving you £0.60 (10.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

    As one of the most acclaimed films of its time Sydney Pollack's dance marathon masterpiece picked up an amazing 9 Academy Award nominations in 1969. With dazzling performances from the entire cast it is easy to see why this film is universally regarded as a true movie classic. In the dark days of the depression dance marathons became a way for desperate people to compete for prize money. Events would last for days as contestants pushed themselves beyond the point of exhaustion while the barbarous crowds watched on wagering money for sport and profit. Against this backdrop the lives of a disparate group of contestants become intertwined. Brought together by chance they move relentlessly around the dance floor in search of a dream... the clock ticks on... which of them will survive?

  • Spartacus [1960] Spartacus | DVD | (27/11/2000) from £4.25  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Stanley Kubrick was only 31 years old when Kirk Douglas (star of Kubrick's classic Paths of Glory) recruited the young director to pilot this epic saga, in which the rebellious slave Spartacus (played by Douglas) leads a freedom revolt against the ailing Roman Republic and its generals. Kubrick would later disown the film because it was not a personal project--he was merely a director-for-hire--but Spartacus remains one of the best of Hollywood's grand historical epics. With an intelligent screenplay by then-blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo (from a novel by Howard Fast), its liberal message of freedom and civil rights, highly relevant in early-1960s USA, is still quite powerful and the all-star cast (including Charles Laughton in full toga) is full of entertaining surprises.Restored in 1991 to include scenes deleted from the original 1960 release, the full-length Spartacus is a grand-scale cinematic marvel, offering some of the most awesome battles ever filmed and a central performance by Douglas that's as sensitively emotional as it is intensely heroic. Jean Simmons plays the slave woman who becomes Spartacus's wife, and Peter Ustinov steals the show with his frequently hilarious, Oscar-winning performance as a slave trader who shamelessly curries favour with his Roman superiors. The restored version also includes a formerly deleted bathhouse scene in which Laurence Olivier's patrician Crassus (with restored dialogue dubbed by Anthony Hopkins) gets hot and bothered over a slave servant played by Tony Curtis. These and other restored scenes expand the film to just over three hours in length. Despite some forgivable lulls, this is a rousing and substantial drama that grabs and holds your attention. Breaking tradition with sophisticated themes and a downbeat (yet eminently noble) conclusion, Spartacus is a thinking person's epic, rising above mere spectacle with a story as impressive as its widescreen action and Oscar-winning sets. --Jeff Shannon

  • Two for the Road (1967) Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) [Masters of Cinema] Two for the Road (1967) Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) | Blu Ray | (19/01/2015) from £9.49  |  Saving you £8.50 (47.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    One of the great films by Stanley Donen (Singin' in the Rain Charade) after the studio era had come to a close Two for the Road was a break-off with the old system one which allowed Donen to further stretch his art aided by screenwriter Frederic Raphael (Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut) in this tale of a couple voluntarily stretching themselves through the long period of their relationship. Portrayed in fragments that span the couple's time together in marriage Two for the Road runs the course of a relationship (between Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney) that finds a circumstantial come-together escalate into newlywed-status and through a series of travails into the serious situation of bearing a daughter. The disturbance of marriage and/or life is chronicled from here on. After so many studio-system smash-hits Two for the Road marked a reckoning for director Donen — which went on to influence directors like Jacques Rivette for its portrayal of a couple in interaction and its keen sense of duration across the length of their time together. The Masters of Cinema Series is proud to present Stanley Donen's Two for the Road for the first time on Blu-ray in a Dual Format edition. Special Dual Format Edition Features: New 1080p presentation of the film (on Blu-ray) in its original aspect ratio. Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing. Feature length commentary with Stanley Donen. Interview with critic Frederic Raphael. 36-PAGE BOOKLET featuring writing on the film and more!

  • Le Mepris [DVD] [1963] Le Mepris | DVD | (05/04/2010) from £11.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (27.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Starring Brigitte Bardot, then at the height of her fame, and Michel Piccoli as a married couple tearing the last strips off a failing marriage, Le Mépris is both one of Jean-Luc Godard's most accessible films and perhaps his most excoriating and emotionally raw. Godard and his regular cinematographer Raoul Coutard (lensman for most of the greatest films of the New Wave) splashed out the budget for this international co-production on Bardot's salary and gorgeous CinemaScope photography to capture the Italian setting's intense beauty, bright as a knife. The nominal story concerns the film production of an adaptation of Homer's Odyssey, on which Piccoli is the scriptwriter, much to the disgust of his wife Camille (Bardot) who preferred life when he merely wrote novels. Hired by Jack Palance's swaggering American producer to adapt the Greek epic for a film to be directed by the august Fritz Lang (director of M, here playing himself), Paul inadvertently sets in motion the elements which will unravel his marriage, earning his wife's contempt (the closest translation of the French word "mépris"). Soon, the tenderness of the film's opening sequence--wherein they loll naked on a bed as she coquettishly solicits his approval of each of her body parts--gives way to harrowing bickering, the meat of film's central 35-minute scene which will induce pained winces in anyone who has ever been through a bitter split-up. If that sounds harrowing, be reassured that Le Mépris is not without its lighter moments and joys: Godard's trademarked musings on the nature of cinema, Bardot looking exquisitely chic in a selection of soigné little outfits, Lang bemusedly quoting the German poet Hölderlin and Bertolt Brecht. As mannered as the New Wave posturings now seem, Le Mépris still looks unbeatably stylish, its themes as eternal as Homer and the Capri landscape. --Leslie Felperin

  • The Hound Of The Baskervilles [1939] The Hound Of The Baskervilles | DVD | (10/05/2004) from £10.25  |  Saving you £2.74 (21.10%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A man runs for his life through the moors breathless and frightened. Behind him we hear the baying of a hound a sound so fearful it chills the soul. The man falls. From the desolate rocky nightscape another man peers: He is bearded and rough looking perhaps a convict from the nearby prison.... Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce star in their first outing as Holmes and Watson in this celebrated adaptation of The Hound Of The Baskervilles....

  • Son Of Frankenstein [1939] Son Of Frankenstein | DVD | (30/01/2013) from £5.44  |  Saving you £4.55 (45.50%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Son Of Frankenstein (1939)

  • Umbrellas Of Cherbourg (50th Anniversary Edition) [DVD] [1964] Umbrellas Of Cherbourg (50th Anniversary Edition) | DVD | (10/02/2014) from £10.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (38.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Voted The Guardian's 14 Best Romantic Film of All Time. Described by director Jacques Demy as 'a film in song' the visually intoxicating The Umbrellas of Cherbourg Pays homage to the Hollywood musical in this masterpiece of French New Wave cinema. Guy Foucher (Nino Castelnuovo) a 20-year-old French auto mechanic has fallen in love with 17-year-old Geneviève Emery (Catherine Deneuve: Belle de Jour) an employee in her widowed mother's chic but financially embattled umbrella shop. On the evening before Guy is to leave for a two-year tour of combat in Algeria the pair share a passionate night. Geneviève becomes pregnant and then must choose between waiting for Guy's return or accepting an attractive offer of marriage from a wealthy diamond merchant (Marc Michel: Lola). Special Features: Feature Geoff Andrew On Umbrellas of Cherbourg Virginie Ledoyen on Umbrellas of Cherbourg Once Upon A Time... The Umbrellas of Cherbourg The World of Jacques Demy The Restoration of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg Stills gallery Trailer Trailer (2013)

  • Battlestar Galactica [Blu-ray] [1978] [Region Free] Battlestar Galactica | Blu Ray | (05/11/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (46.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    In the deepest reaches of space the fight to save all human life from extinction has begun in this science fiction adventure that launched the Battlestar Galactica phenomenon! Hopeful for lasting peace following centuries of intense warfare the Twelve Colonies gather to sign a treaty with their dreaded enemies the Cylons. But after an act of treachery on the eve of the ceremony the Cylons launch a devastating surprise attack destroying the Colonies' home planets and most of their military strength. A lone flagship battlestar the Galactica remains to aid the surviving colonists on their epic journey for a new home to a far-off legendary planet - Earth. They must survive the pursuing Cylons in a series of epic battles that will determine the fate of the human race in this non-stop action-packed classic filled with cutting-edge special effects by John Dykstra (Star Wars Spider-Man).

  • Marilyn Monroe - The Diamond Collection [1951] Marilyn Monroe - The Diamond Collection | DVD | (05/08/2002) from £29.95  |  Saving you £50.04 (62.60%)  |  RRP £79.99

    Released to mark the 40th anniversary of her death in 1962, The Diamond Collection brings together all of Marilyn Monroe's films for 20th Century Fox. This handsome box set stands as a salutary reminder of the considerable achievements of an actress who still reigns supreme as the greatest screen goddess of them all. The uninitiated might be surprised at the versatility of someone whose legend is founded so much on her image as a sex symbol. In particular, her touching performance as the abused second-rate bar singer Cherie in Bus Stop (1956) is a rounded study of a woman still capable of dreaming when life has done everything to dull her. The box set as a whole offers plenty of evidence that while she certainly specialised in a unique and complex variation on the blonde bombshell stereotype--embodied in her timeless performances as Lorelei Lee (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes) and short-sighted Pola in How to Marry a Millionaire, both 1953--she could certainly diversify. The documentary, Marilyn Monroe: The Final Days, provides a sympathetic take on the troubles and behaviour which led to her being sacked from her final picture, Something's Got to Give. The presentation of the restored footage from that movie is less successful, though, as the glimpses of Monroe's incandescent screen presence, belying her illness and depression, leave a palpable sadness in their wake. Better by far to focus on her earlier work. Whatever the role, her luminous beauty and statuesque figure, combined with an unselfconsciously joyful sexuality and an on-screen vulnerability, were always at their best under the careful guidance of directors like Billy Wilder and Otto Preminger. These qualities continue to give her an enduring appeal. On the DVD: The Diamond Collection has been digitally restored using, for the most part, the original negatives, making this a sumptuous package for any Monroe fan. Niagara and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes are both presented in standard 4:3 ratio but the rest--filmed in Cinemascope and presented here in letterbox format--are certainly better-served by widescreen viewing. The colours, like Monroe, come alive. The sound quality is crisp and Monroe's singing--she had limited but genuine musical talent--has polished up well. Multiple extras include before-and-after restoration comparisons, trailers from various countries, stills and posters, and newsreel footage. Eleven discs of Marilyn in one box, this is a veritable feast indeed. --Piers Ford

  • The Man In The White Suit [DVD] [1951] The Man In The White Suit | DVD | (19/11/2012) from £8.95  |  Saving you £7.04 (44.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    In celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the birth of one of Ealing's greatest directors, Alexander Mackendrick, StudioCanal are releasing the restored version of the DVD and the first ever Blu-Ray of The Man In The White Suit starring Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood, Cecil Parker. Ealing Studios' output from the 1940s and 1950s helped define what was arguably the golden age for British cinema. It fostered great directors such as Alexander Mackendrick and Robert Hamer, while giving stars such as Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers the chance to shine. Sidney Stratton (Alec Guinness), a humble inventor, develops a fabric which never gets dirty or wears out. This would seem to be a boon for mankind, but the established garment manufacturers don't see it that way; they try to suppress it. Nevertheless, Sidney is determined to put his invention on the market, forcing the clothing factory bigwigs to resort to more desperate measures. Special Features: Exclusive 'Revisiting The Man In The White Suit' Featurette Stills Gallery Restoration Comparison Trailer

  • Annie Hall [Blu-ray] [1977] Annie Hall | Blu Ray | (26/08/2013) from £7.59  |  Saving you £5.40 (41.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Annie Hall is one of the truest, most bittersweet romances on film. In it, Allen plays a thinly disguised version of himself: Alvy Singer, a successful--if neurotic--television comedian living in Manhattan. Annie (the wholesomely luminous Dianne Keaton) is a Midwestern transplant who dabbles in photography and sings in small clubs. When the two meet, the sparks are immediate--if repressed. Alone in her apartment for the first time, Alvy and Annie navigate a minefield of self-conscious "is-this-person-someone-I'd-want-to-get-involved-with?" conversation. As they speak, subtitles flash their unspoken thoughts: the likes of "I'm not smart enough for him" and "I sound like a jerk". Despite all their caution, they connect, and we're swept up in the flush of their new romance. Allen's antic sensibility shines here in a series of flashbacks to Alvy's childhood, growing up, quite literally, under a rumbling roller coaster. His boisterous Jewish family's dinner table shares a split screen with the WASP-y Hall's tight-lipped holiday table, one Alvy has joined for the first time. His position as outsider is incontestable when he looks down the table and sizes up Annie's "Grammy Hall" as "a classic Jew-hater".The relationship arcs, as does Annie's growing desire for independence. It quickly becomes clear that the two are on separate tracks, as what was once endearing becomes annoying. Annie Hall embraces Allen's central themes--his love affair with New York (and hatred of Los Angeles), how impossible relationships are, and his fear of death. But their balance is just right, the chemistry between Allen's worry-wart Alvy and Keaton's gangly, loopy Annie is one of the screen's best pairings. It couldn't be more engaging. --Susan Benson

  • Heaven Can Wait [DVD] [1943] Heaven Can Wait | DVD | (05/11/2012) from £6.79  |  Saving you £3.20 (32.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Newly deceased playboy Henry Van Cleve (Don Ameche) presents himself to the outer offices of Hades, where he asks a bemused Satan for permission to enter the gates of hell. Though the Devil doubts Henry's sins will qualify him for eternal damnation, Henry proceeds to recount a lifetime spent wooing and pursuing women, his long, happy marriage to Martha (Gene Tierney) not withstanding. Nominated for Academy Awards for best picture and director, <b><i>Heaven Can Wait</i></b> is an enduring cl...

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