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Classic Films

  • David and Bathsheba [DVD] [1951] David and Bathsheba | DVD | (02/07/2012) from £6.89  |  Saving you £3.10 (31.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    After King David sees the beautiful Bathsheba bathing from the palace roof, he enters into an adulterous affair which has tragic consequences for his family and Israel

  • Rififi [Blu-ray] Rififi | Blu Ray | (17/11/2014) from £10.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (45.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    RIFIFI (ri-f’ -fi) n. French argot. 1. Quarrel rumble free-for-all open hostilities between individuals or gangs rough and tumble confrontation between two or more individuals. 2. A tense and chaotic situation involving violent confrontations between parties. A seminal work of crime filmmaking that lead the young critic François Truffaut to declare “the best Film Noir I have ever seen” Jules Dassin’s Rififi [Du rififi chez les hommes] has influenced films as diverse as Reservoir Dogs and Ocean’s Eleven since its release. Following Tony le Stéphanois (Jean Servais) a master thief fresh out of jail wearing a harried look and suffering ill health he refuses to be involved with crime until he finds his girlfriend shacked up with a rival gangster. With little reason to keep living he plans a final job. Tony sets about finding his crew and meticulously planning the job; a robbery of the jewellery store Mappin & Webb. Rififi revolves around the central heist famed for its finite detail and incredible tension but the drama does not end at the heist like so many other crime films. Dassin’s film is a humanist tale that hinges on the loyalty among thieves and draws on the fatalistic doom laden lives common to crooks and thieves in pulp literature. An instant commercial success in Paris and worldwide the film was also very well received by the critics with Jules Dassin being awarded the best director prize at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival. Arrow Academy is proud to present Jules Dassin’s legendary film in 1080p high definition for the first time in the UK. FEATURES: High Definition restoration Uncompressed original mono PCM audio Newly translated English subtitles Introduction by French cinema critic and author Ginette Vincendeau Interview with Jules Dassin Q&A with Jules Dassin from BFI Southbank London Original Theatrical Trailer Reversible sleeve featuring two original artworks Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by critic and filmmaker David Cairns Alastair Philips on source novel author Auguste Le Breton and the Série Noire a contemporary review by François Truffaut notes on the translation and the BBFC’s John Trevelyan on Rififi illustrated with original posters and stills

  • The Red Shoes [DVD] [1948] The Red Shoes | DVD | (06/07/2009) from £7.98  |  Saving you £8.01 (50.10%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The tragic and romantic story of Vicky Page the brilliant young dancer who must give up everything if she is to become a great ballerina is one of Powell and Pressburger's most famous films. Creators of classics such as Black Narcissus A Matter of Life And Death and The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp they were renowned for their use of brilliant colour and wonderful costumes and with the exhilarating cinematography of Jack Cardiff were among the most influential film makers of their time. The Red Shoes is one of the finest examples of their work and has become an inspiration to artists film makers and musicians all over the world.

  • Witness for the Prosecution [DVD] [1957] Witness for the Prosecution | DVD | (11/02/2013) from £5.49  |  Saving you £4.50 (45.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and Charles Laughton star in this brilliantly made courtroom drama (Film Daily) that left audiences reeling from its surprise twists and shocking climax. Directed by Billy Wilder, scripted by Wilder and Harry Kurnitz, and based on Agatha Christie's hit London play, this splendid, six-time Oscar-nominated classic crackles with emotional electricity (The New York Times) and continues to keep movie lovers riveted until the final, mesmerizing frame. When a wealthy widow is found murdered, her married suitor, Leonard Vole (Power), is accused of the crime. Vole's only hope for acquittal is the testimony of his wife (Dietrich)...but his airtight alibi shatters when she reveals some shocking secrets of her own!

  • Love Story [DVD] [1970] Love Story | DVD | (14/01/2013) from £5.00  |  Saving you £14.99 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Strife-torn America wanted a meat-and-potatoes romance in the late 1960s, and the country embraced Erich Segal's slim, generic-sounding novel in a big way. It did so again for the film adaptation of Love Story in 1970, starring Ryan O'Neal as a law student who defies his rich and powerful father (Ray Milland) on every issue, including the former's love for a music student (Ali MacGraw). The two marry, start life together ... and then the Grim Reaper turns up at the door. Directed by Arthur Hiller (The In-Laws), the film ends up lacking the kind of stylistic boost that might have made it a must-see for the ages. But its faithfulness to the book's uncomplicated and, yes, moving intentions is pretty solid. O'Neal is convincing as a nice guy who's as bullheaded in his own way as his steely father (a nice job by Milland), and MacGraw has a way of getting under one's skin. A viewer just has to try not laughing at the refrain, "Love means never having to say you're sorry". --Tom Keogh

  • The Innocents [1961] The Innocents | DVD | (11/12/2006) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Innocents tells of an impressionable and repressed governess Miss Giddens (Deborah Kerr) who agrees to tutor two orphaned children Miles (Martin Stephens) and Flora (Pamela Franklin). On arrival at Bly House she becomes convinced that the children are possessed by the perverse spirits of former governess Miss Jessel (Clytie Jessop) and her Heathcliffe-like lover Quint (Peter Wyngarde) who both met with mysterious deaths.

  • Magical Mystery Tour [DVD] [2012] Magical Mystery Tour | DVD | (08/10/2012) from £10.69  |  Saving you £7.30 (40.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Songs you'll never forget, the film you've never seen and a story that's never been heard. In 1967, in the wake of the extraordinary impact of the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album and the Our World satellite broadcast of All You Need Is Love, The Beatles devised, wrote and directed their third film, Magical Mystery Tour, a dreamlike story of a coach day trip to the seaside. Apple Films have fully restored the long out-of-print, classic feature film for October 8th release worldwide...

  • An Affair to Remember [DVD] [1957] An Affair to Remember | DVD | (02/07/2012) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    In this poignant and humorous love story nominated for four Academy Awards, Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr meet on an ocean liner and fall deeply in love. Though each is engaged to someone else, they agree to meet six months later at the Empire State Building if they still feel the same way about each other. But a tragic accident prevents their rendezvous and the lovers' future takes an emotional and uncertain turn.

  • The Quiet Man [DVD] [1952] The Quiet Man | DVD | (03/06/2013) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton

  • Doctor Who: The Rescue & The Romans Doctor Who: The Rescue & The Romans | DVD | (23/02/2009) from £13.09  |  Saving you £16.90 (56.40%)  |  RRP £29.99

    The Rescue: Arriving on the planet Dido in the late 25th Century the time travellers come upon a crashed spaceship from Earth. Its two occupants - a paralysed man named Bennett and a young girl Vicki - are living in fear of a creature called Koquillion a native whose people have apparently killed the other members of the human expedition. However the Doctor quickly deduces that Koquillion is in fact Bennett in disguise; it was he who killed the others in order to conceal an earlier murder he had committed on the ship. The Romans: The four time travellers are enjoying a rare holiday staying at a villa not far from Rome in the year 64 AD. The Doctor soon becomes restless and sets off to visit the city taking Vicki with him. In their absence Ian and Barbara are kidnapped by slave traders. Having been mistaken for the famous lyre player Maximus Pettulian and asked to perform at the Emperor Nero's Court the Doctor has to devise ever more elaborate schemes to avoid revealing that he cannot actually play the instrument. Ian meanwhile becomes a galley slave while Barbara is sold to Nero's slave buyer Tavius at an auction in Rome. Ian and a fellow slave named Delos escape from the galley when it is wrecked in a storm and make their way to Rome to try to find and rescue Barbara.

  • Young Frankenstein [Blu-ray] [1974] Young Frankenstein | Blu Ray | (07/10/2013) from £8.25  |  Saving you £1.74 (17.40%)  |  RRP £9.99

    If you were to argue Mel Brooks' Young Frankenstein ranks among the top-10 funniest movies of all time, nobody could reasonably dispute the claim. Spoofing classic horror in the way that Brooks' previous film Blazing Saddles sent up classic Westerns, the movie is both a loving tribute and a raucous, irreverent parody of Universal's classic horror films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Filming in glorious black and white, Brooks recreated the Frankenstein laboratory using the equipment from the original Frankenstein (courtesy of designer Kenneth Strickfaden), and this loving attention to physical and stylistic detail creates a solid foundation for non-stop comedy. The story, of course, involves Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) and his effort to resume experiments in re-animation pioneered by his late father. (He's got some help, since dad left behind a book titled How I Did It.) Assisting him is the hapless hunchback Igor (Marty Feldman) and the buxom but none-too-bright maiden Inga (Teri Garr), and when Frankenstein succeeds in creating his monster (Peter Boyle), the stage is set for an outrageous revision of the Frankenstein legend. With comedy highlights too numerous to mention, Brooks guides his brilliant cast (also including Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars and Gene Hackman in a classic cameo role) through scene after scene of inspired hilarity. Indeed, Young Frankenstein is a charmed film, nothing less than a comedy classic, representing the finest work from everyone involved. Not one joke has lost its payoff, and none of the countless gags have lost their zany appeal. From a career that includes some of the best comedies ever made, this is the film for which Mel Brooks will be most fondly remembered. No video library should be without a copy of Young Frankenstein. And just remember--it's pronounced "Fronkensteen". --Jeff Shannon

  • Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [1977] Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) | Blu Ray | (06/11/2017) from £8.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Exiled from their home nations, four strangers from separate corners of the earth agree to undertake a dangerous mission to transport unstable dynamite through the dense jungle of South America in order to earn their passage home. When the slightest bump in the road could equal instant death, the real question is not whether these men will survive this nerve-shredding ordeal but who will they have become if they return at all? After the success of The French Connection and The Exorcist, William Friedkin began work on his biggest project to date. Seizing the moment, he embarked on an ambitious and lengthy shoot in the dense jungles of the Dominican Republic and like Werner Herzog with Fitzcoraldo and Francis Ford Coppola on Apocalypse Now, Friedkin battled the elements, came face-to-face with nature and emerged victorious. Now, 40 years since its release, Sorcerer is regarded by critics and filmmakers alike as a true lost cinematic masterpiece a feat of filmmaking that encapsulates the revolutionary artistry of 1970s American cinema that is a triumph to behold Special Features: Sorcerers A Conversation with William Friedkin and Nicolas Winding Refn (74 mins) The Mystery of Fate A letter from director William Friedkin Newly commissioned artwork to celebrate the 40th Anniversary Reversible sleeve containing the newly commissioned and original theatrical artwork

  • Rosemary's Baby [Blu-ray] [1968] [Region Free] Rosemary's Baby | Blu Ray | (07/10/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Under ROMAN POLANSKI's chilling direction, a classic thriller is born. Rosemary (MIA FARROW) and Guy Woodhouse (JOHN CASSAVETES) are newlyweds, but Rosemary has no idea that her wedded bliss is about to come to a horrific end. Her husband's ambition as a struggling actor is about to plunge her into an abyss of terror like she has never known. In exchange for a taste of fame, Guy makes a deal with the devil that puts his wife and soul in jeopardy. When Rosemary becomes pregnant, her husband b...

  • Move Over Darling [DVD] [1963] Move Over Darling | DVD | (21/03/2011) from £6.19  |  Saving you £9.80 (61.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Move Over Darling is a wonderful romantic comedy starring screen legend and number one office box office star of the time Doris Day.

  • The Lost Weekend [Masters of Cinema] (Blu-ray) The Lost Weekend (Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (25/06/2012) from £9.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    "I'm not a drinker--I'm a drunk." These words, and the serious message behind them, were still potent enough in 1945 to shock audiences flocking to The Lost Weekend. The speaker is Don Birnam (Ray Milland), a handsome, talented, articulate alcoholic. The writing team of producer Charles Brackett and director Billy Wilder pull no punches in their depiction of Birnam's massive weekend bender, a tailspin that finds him reeling from his favorite watering hole to Bellevue Hospital. Location shooting in New York helps the street-level atmosphere, especially a sequence in which Birnam, a budding writer, tries to hock his typewriter for booze money. He desperately staggers past shuttered storefronts--it's Yom Kippur, and the pawnshops are closed. Milland, previously known as a lightweight leading man (he'd starred in Wilder's hilarious The Major and the Minor three years earlier), burrows convincingly under the skin of the character, whether waxing poetic about the escape of drinking or screaming his lungs out in the D.T.'s sequence. Wilder, having just made the ultra-noir Double Indemnity, brought a new kind of frankness and darkness to Hollywood's treatment of a social problem. At first the film may have seemed too bold; Paramount Pictures nearly killed the release of the picture after it tested poorly with preview audiences. But once in release, The Lost Weekend became a substantial hit, and won four Oscars: for picture, director, screenplay, and actor. --Robert Horton

  • Life of Brian: Collector's Edition (Re-Package)  [DVD] [1979] Life of Brian: Collector's Edition (Re-Package) | DVD | (07/11/2016) from £3.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    There is not a single joke, sight-gag or one-liner in Monty Python's Life of Brian that will not forever burn itself into the viewer's memory as being just as funny as it is possible to be, but--extraordinarily--almost every indestructibly hilarious scene also serves a dual purpose, making this one of the most consistently sustained film satires ever made. Like all great satire, the Pythons not only attack and vilify their targets (the bigotry and hypocrisy of organised religion and politics) supremely well, they also propose an alternative: be an individual, think for yourself, don't be led by others. "You've all got to work it out for yourselves", cries Brian in a key moment. "Yes, we've all got to work it our for ourselves", the crowd reply en masse. Two thousand years later, in a world still blighted by religious zealots, Brian's is still a lone voice crying in the wilderness. Aside from being a neat spoof on the Hollywood epic, it's also almost incidentally one of the most realistic on-screen depictions of the ancient world--instead of treating their characters as posturing historical stereotypes, the Pythons realised what no sword 'n' sandal epic ever has: that people are all the same, no matter what period of history they live in. People always have and always will bicker, lie, cheat, swear, conceal cowardice with bravado (like Reg, leader of the People's Front of Judea), abuse power (like Pontius Pilate), blindly follow the latest fads and giggle at silly things ("Biggus Dickus"). In the end, Life of Brian teaches us that the only way for a despairing individual to cope in a world of idiocy and hypocrisy is to always look on the bright side of life. On the DVD: Life of Brian returns to Region 2 DVD in a decent widescreen anamorphic print with Dolby 5.1 sound--neither are exactly revelatory, but at least it's an improvement on the previous release, which was, shockingly, pan & scan. The 50-minute BBC documentary, "The Pythons", was filmed mainly on location in 1979 and isn't especially remarkable or insightful (a new retrospective would have been appreciated). There are trailers for this movie, as well as Holy Grail plus three other non-Python movies. There's no commentary track, sadly. --Mark Walker

  • Dad's Army: The Movie [DVD] [1971] Dad's Army: The Movie | DVD | (23/11/2015) from £4.99  |  Saving you £1.00 (16.70%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Five fine episodes of the evergreen Home Guard sitcom here. Dad's Army endures because it combines a healthy dollop of self-mockery with a sense of pride in Britain's lonely defiance against Hitler's might in 1940, encapsulated in the pompous and incompetent yet courageous Captain Mainwaring. Arthur Lowe is sublime in this role. Though he generally acts as a foil to his flippant platoon of funny stereotypes (Walker, Frazier, Godfrey, etc.), his subtle double-takes and apoplectic facial expressions of exasperation are endlessly hilarious. Corporal Jones' doddery recklessness can generally be relied upon to culminate in a finale involving trousers, cries of "Don't panic!" and chases across country but the masterstroke of this series was the casting against type of John Le Mesurier as the vague, aristocratic Sergeant and Lowe as his military but not social superior. These episodes include "The Day The Balloon Went Up" (a typically frantic caper involving a stray barrage balloon), "The Two And A Half Feathers" (including a wonderful Jonesy flashback to his days in the Sudan) and "The Deadly Attachment", in which Pike cheeks the captain of a captive U-Boat crew, who demands his name to add to his "list" of insolent Englanders. "Don't tell him, Pike!" urges Mainwaring. --David Stubbs

  • The Producers [1968] The Producers | DVD | (25/08/2008) from £7.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (38.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Low rent Broadway producer Max Bialystock (Zero Mostel) and his high-strung accountant Leo Bloom (Gene Wilder) discover that with the help of a few gullible investors they can make more money on a flop than on a hit! Armed with the worst show ever written (Springtime For Hitler) and an equally bizarre cast this double dealing duo is banking on disaster. But when their sure-to-offend musical becomes a smash hit they find themselves in the middle of a Broadway blitzkrieg! Winner of an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay Mel Brooks recently adapted his classic film as a Broadway musical and scooped a record-breaking 12 Tony awards.

  • To Catch a Thief [DVD] [1955] To Catch a Thief | DVD | (14/01/2013) from £4.00  |  Saving you £15.99 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The French Riviera… two luminous stars (Grace Kelly, Cary Grant)… and the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, behind the camera. They all add up to one romantic, dazzling screen thriller. Grant plays John Robie, a retired jewel thief once known as 'The Cat', who catches the eye of Frances Stevens (Kelly), a pampered, vacationing heiress. But when a new rash of gem thefts occurs amongst the luxury hotels of the spectacular French playground, it appears that 'The Cat' is on the prowl once again. Is Robie truly reformed? Or is he deviously using Frances to gain access to the tempting collection of fabulous jewellery belonging to her mother (Jessie Royce Landis)? Romantic sparks fly as the suspense builds in this glittering Hitchcock classic that nabbed an Oscar for Best Cinematography. Special Features: Commentary by Peter Bogdanovich and Laurent Bouzereau Featurettes: 1.) Writing and Casting To Catch A Thief 2.) The Making Of To Catch A Thief 3.) Alfred Hitchcock and To Catch A Thief: An Appreciation 4.) Edith Head- The Paramount Years Featurette Theatrical Trailer

  • 12 Angry Men [Blu-ray] [1957] 12 Angry Men | Blu Ray | (03/06/2013) from £11.97  |  Saving you £-1.98 (-19.80%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Ed Begley and Jack Klugman lead the distinctive cast of jurors whose character portrayals are perfect in every detail (The Hollywood Reporter). With its star-powered cast and three Oscar Nominations including Best Picture, 12 Angry Men is a powerful, suspenseful and fascinatingly entertaining film (Los Angeles Examiner). Eleven jurors are convinced that the defendant is guilty of murder. The twelfth has no doubt of his innocence. How can this one man steer the others toward the same conclusion? It's a case of seemingly overwhelming evidence against a teenager accused of killing his father in one of the best pictures ever made (The Hollywood Reporter).

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