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Director Alan Parker

  • The Commitments [DVD] The Commitments | DVD | (19/09/2016) from £7.69  |  Saving you £12.30 (61.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Available for the first time ever on Blu-ray, from acclaimed director Alan Parker comes the award-winning film that took the world by storm. Jimmy Rabbitte (Robert Arkins) knows he's the world's greatest band manager.... now he just needs a band. Auditioning everyone he can find, Jimmy gathers ten of the most talented, least experienced musicians from the rough streets of working-class Dublin with a plan to launch the greatest Irish Soul band in the world. It s a joyful mixture of great characters, super dialogue and wonderful music (The Sun); foul-mouthed, fast-talking and very funny (Time Out); with a soundtrack from soul paradise (Daily Telegraph. One of the greatest films in the last 50 years (BBC Movie Connections), Ladies and Gentlemen, please put your working class hands together for the saviours of soul... The Commitments. 25th Anniversary Special Edition comes with a digital copy - yours to download, watch and own. SPECIAL FEATURES Digital Copy 25 Years Later: All-New Interviews with Alan Parker and Cast Audio Commentary with Alan Parker Four Behind-the-Scenes Featurettes Music Video Image Galleries Collectible Booklet

  • Fame [1980] Fame | DVD | (22/09/2003) from £3.69  |  Saving you £10.30 (73.60%)  |  RRP £13.99

    This early effort by director Alan Parker is lively but jagged as it follows four students through their years in the New York City High School for the Performing Arts. Rather predictably, the kids fall into four clearly defined stereotypes: brazen, gay and hypersensitive, prickly, shy. Fame makes up for a disjointed presentation with a lot of heart and a great soundtrack (for which it won two Academy Awards). The hopes and disappointments, failures and successes of these teens are fodder for emotional scenes and exuberant dancing in the streets. It also turned out to be the first of many imitators and spawned a popular television series. (It was the breakout film for the short-lived feature-film career of Irene Cara, who sang the title song.) --Rochelle O'Gorman

  • Pink Floyd - The Wall [1982] Pink Floyd - The Wall | DVD | (22/04/2005) from £7.59  |  Saving you £-0.30 (-3.80%)  |  RRP £7.99

    By any rational measure, Alan Parker's cinematic interpretation of Pink Floyd's The Wall is a glorious failure. Glorious because its imagery is hypnotically striking, frequently resonant and superbly photographed by the gifted cinematographer Peter Biziou. And a failure because the entire exercise is hopelessly dour, loyal to the bleak themes and psychological torment of Roger Waters' great musical opus, and yet utterly devoid of the humour that Waters certainly found in his own material. Any attempt to visualise The Wall would be fraught with artistic danger, and Parker succumbs to his own self-importance, creating a film that's as fascinating as it is flawed. The film is, for better and worse, the fruit of three artists in conflict--Parker indulging himself, and Waters in league with designer Gerald Scarfe, whose brilliant animated sequences suggest that he should have directed and animated this film in its entirety. Fortunately, this clash of talent and ego does not prevent The Wall from being a mesmerising film. Boomtown Rats frontman Bob Geldof (in his screen debut) is a fine choice to play Waters's alter ego--an alienated, "comfortably numb" rock star whose psychosis manifests itself as an emotional (and symbolically physical) wall between himself and the cold, cruel world. Weaving Waters's autobiographical details into his own jumbled vision, Parker ultimately fails to combine a narrative thread with experimental structure. It's a rich, bizarre, and often astonishing film that will continue to draw a following, but the real source of genius remains the music of Roger Waters. --Jeff Shannon

  • Evita [1997] Evita | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    After more than a decade of false starts and several potential directors, the popular Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical finally made it to the big screen with Alan Parker (The Commitments) at the helm and Madonna in the coveted title role of Argentina's first lady, Eva Perón. A triumph of production design, costuming, cinematography, and epic-scale pageantry, the film follows the rise of Eva Perón to the level of supreme social and political celebrity in the 1940s. Like Madonna, Perón was a material girl (she was only 33 when she died); she was instrumental in the political success of her husband, Juan Perón (Jonathan Pryce). But Eva was also a supremely tragic figure whose life was essentially hollow at its core despite the lavish benefits of her nearly goddess-like status. The film Evita has a similar quality--it's visually astonishing but emotionally distant, and benefits greatly from the singing commentary of Ché (Antonia Banderas), who serves as a passionate chorus to guide the viewer through the elaborate parade of history. --Jeff Shannon

  • Mississippi Burning [DVD] [1988] Mississippi Burning | DVD | (28/01/2013) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Prepare to be shaken and moved as three young men in the 1960s meet their violent and untimely deaths on a dark Mississippi highway in this powerful and poignant drama. Based on the real-life murder investigation of three civil rights activists and starring two-time Oscar winner Gene Hackman and Academy Award nominee Willem Dafoe, Mississippi Burning ranks as one of the most potent and insightful views of racial turmoil yet produced. Nominated for six Oscars and winner of the 1988 Academy Awa...

  • Midnight Express [1978] Midnight Express | DVD | (04/02/2008) from £4.00  |  Saving you £8.99 (69.20%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Brad Davis (The Player) and John Hurt (Alien) star in this riveting true story of a young American's nightmarish experiences in a Turkish prison and his unforgettable journey to freedom.Busted for attempting to smuggle hashish out of Istanbul American college student Billy Hayes (Davies) is thrown into the city's most brutal jail. After suffering through four years of sadistic torture and inhuman conditions Billy is about to be released when his parole is denied. Only his inner courage and the support of a fellow inmate (Hurt) give him the strength to catch the Midnight Express (prison code for escape).

  • Angela's Ashes [2000] Angela's Ashes | DVD | (17/07/2000) from £4.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (73.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Because Frank McCourt's bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir Angela's Ashes was dearly embraced by millions of readers, it was perhaps inevitable that Alan Parker's film version would prove somewhat disappointing. McCourt's book is blessed with subtleties of language and detailed observation that do not easily lend themselves to screen interpretation, and Parker's film suffers from an overly literal, reverently sombre approach that lacks the cumulative emotions of McCourt's account of impoverished youth in Ireland. And where McCourt was able to enliven his family's suffering with tenacious humour and fighting Irish spirit, Parker's film provides precious little uplift in the course of 145 minutes.The film is by no means an artistic failure. While admirably avoiding sentiment, Parker is nearly peerless in his direction of children, and the three actors playing Frank at ages 7, 11, and 15 are uniformly superb. As photographed by Michael Seresin, the re-created lanes of Limerick, Ireland are almost painfully authentic in the cold, grey dampness that permeates nearly every scene (this is surely one of the wettest films ever made). As the McCourt parents--chronically depressed Angela and recklessly drunken Malachy--Emily Watson and Robert Carlyle successfully bypass the pitfalls of melodrama in a film that could have wallowed in bathos. And while Parker's anecdotal approach falls short in conveying the fullness of McCourt's experience (the director fared better with the Irish rockers of The Commitments), Angela's Ashes captures a specific time and place with vivid force, remaining loyal to the spirit of Frank McCourt's beloved tale of survival. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Commitments [1991] The Commitments | DVD | (28/07/2003) from £4.60  |  Saving you £7.80 (60.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    An irresistible, comic drama from director Alan Parker (Evita, Mississippi Burning), overflowing and alive with passion, humor and music, The Commitments showcases some old R&B standards in a new light. A headstrong, fast-talking, ambitious young Dubliner (Robert Arkins) fancies himself a promoter of talent, and sets about assembling and packaging a local Irish R&B band. His group of self-absorbed, backbiting, but stunningly talented individuals begin to succeed beyond his wildest dreams, until petty jealousies and recrimination threaten to scuttle the whole deal. A moody, vivid and soulful exploration of the Dublin club scene as well as a showcase for some wonderful unknown actors, the film (and its wonderful soundtrack) also features the actual band covering classic soul tunes from the likes of Otis Redding and Sam and Dave. It's that combination of soul and soul music that makes The Commitments a special little film. --Robert Lane, Amazon.com --This text refers to the VHS edition of this video

  • Birdy [1984] Birdy | DVD | (17/04/2000) from £14.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (20.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Based on William Wharton's transcendent novel of the same name, this film is about many things: friendship, war, and, of course, birds. The framing device is an effort by a horribly scarred combat soldier (Nicolas Cage) to break through to his best friend, Birdy (Matthew Modine), hospitalised after seemingly being driven mad by fighting in the Vietnam War. Cage then flashes back to their boyhood, where Birdy, a canary aficionado, was considered the school weirdo but managed to be a solid companion none the less. Directed by Alan Parker, it works best as a coming-of-age story, but misses the bizarre psychological transferences of the book, in which Birdy imagines himself within the world of canaries he creates in his bedroom at his parents' house. Modine is fine as an out-of-it misfit enraptured by his own little universe. --Marshall Fine

  • Angel Heart [1987] Angel Heart | DVD | (22/09/2008) from £6.59  |  Saving you £6.40 (49.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The film packed with stunning images jaw-dropping scenes and superb performances from Robert De Niro and Mickey Rourke is a fusion of two genres - the classic Chandleresque detective story and the supernatural. Harry Angel is hired for $125 a day to track down the big band swinger Johnny Favourite. What seems like a straight-forward missing person case dramatically becomes a murder hunt for this down-and-out private detective. His client Louis Cypher a mysterious stranger is forced to up his fee to keep Angel on the case. Each of Angel's leads ends up as a victim of a ritualistic act of murder as he begins to put together the pieces in the jigsaw of Johnny's strange story... the nightmare has just begun.

  • Mississippi Burning [1989] Mississippi Burning | DVD | (17/09/2001) from £5.25  |  Saving you £9.70 (60.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Gene Hackman and Willem Dafoe star in Mississippi Burning, a well-intentioned and largely successful civil-rights-era thriller. Using the real-life 1964 disappearance of three civil rights workers as its inspiration, the film tells the story of two FBI men (Hackman and Dafoe, entertainingly called "Hoover Boys" by the locals) who come in to try to solve the crime. Hackman is a former small-town Mississippi sheriff himself, while Dafoe is a by-the-numbers young hotshot. (Yes, there is some tension between the two.) The movie has an interesting fatalism, as all the FBI's best efforts simply incite more and more violence--the film's message, perhaps inadvertently, seems to be that vigilantism is the only real way to get things done. The brilliant Frances McDormand, here early in her career, is not given enough to do but still does it well enough to have racked up an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. (Hackman also received a nomination for Best Actor, and the film won an Academy Award for Cinematography). Mississippi Burning is ultimately unsatisfying--it is, after all, the story of white men coming in to rescue poor blacks--but it is beautifully shot and very watchable, featuring a terrific cast playing at the top of their games. --Ali Davis, Amazon.com

  • The Commitments - 25th Anniversary Blu-ray The Commitments - 25th Anniversary Blu-ray | Blu Ray | (19/09/2016) from £8.69  |  Saving you £16.30 (65.20%)  |  RRP £24.99

    As enjoyable now as it was when it was originally released at the start of the 90s, Alan Parker?s The Commitments is the tale of an Irish soul band, from start through to very messy finish. There are several reasons why it works so well. The first is a corking script by Roddy Doyle (who wrote the book the film is based on) in conjunction with British sitcom legends Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais (Dad?s Army, among many other credits). Extremely witty and the rock-solid foundation for the film, the script is then enhanced by a selection of super performances from then-unknown actors (most of whom have never enjoyed the same success again). And then there?s the factor that the film is most fondly remembered for, the quite brilliant music. Not for nothing did The Commitments generate two top-selling soundtrack albums, and the inspired choice of classic numbers are as enjoyable to hear now as they were then. From "Mustang Sally" and "Chain of Fools" through to the quite sublime take on "Try A Little Tenderness", you wouldn?t say the music makes the film, but it does significantly lift it. In short, The Commitments is a film that time has been kind to, and one that remains as downright entertaining and enjoyable as it always was. This Special Edition DVD is a great way to get into it all over again?--Simon Brew

  • Bugsy Malone [Blu-ray] [1976] Bugsy Malone | Blu Ray | (23/06/2008) from £6.49  |  Saving you £13.50 (67.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Written and directed by Alan Parker Bugsy Malone is a gangster musical set in New York a world of would-be hoodlums showgirls and dreamers. A world where you never see an adult - kids play the entire film including Scott Biao as Bugsy and Jodie Foster as Tallulah. Bugsy Malone. is totally unique: quite simply there has never ever been a movie like it!

  • Mississippi Burning [Blu-ray] Mississippi Burning | Blu Ray | (14/09/2015) from £8.99  |  Saving you £10.70 (53.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A well-intentioned and largely successful civil rights-era thriller, Mississippi Burning uses the real-life 1964 disappearance of three civil rights workers as its inspiration. The film tells the story of two FBI men (Gene Hackman and Willem Dafoe, entertainingly called "Hoover Boys" by the locals) who come in to try to solve the crime. Hackman is a former Mississippi small-town sheriff himself, while Dafoe is a by-the-numbers young hotshot. Yes, there is some tension between the two. The film has an interesting fatalism, as all the FBI's best efforts incite more and more violence which becomes disturbing--the film's message, perhaps inadvertently, seems to be that vigilantism is the only real way to get things done. The brilliant Frances McDormand, here early in her career, is not given enough to do but still does it well enough to have racked up an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. (Hackman also received a nomination for Best Actor and the film won an Academy Award for Cinematography). The storyline of Mississippi Burning is ultimately unsatisfying--it is after all the story of white men coming in to rescue poor blacks--but it is beautifully shot, very watchable, and features a terrific cast playing at the top of their games. --Ali Davis, Amazon.com

  • Bugsy Malone - Sing-Along Edition [1976] Bugsy Malone - Sing-Along Edition | DVD | (26/03/2007) from £7.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Written and directed by Alan Parker Bugsy Malone is a gangster musical set in New York a world of would-be hoodlums showgirls and dreamers. A world where you never see an adult - kids play the entire film including Scott Biao as Bugsy and Jodie Foster as Tallulah. Bugsy Malone is totally unique: quite simply there has never ever been a movie like it!

  • The Life of David Gale [2003] The Life of David Gale | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £4.49  |  Saving you £15.50 (77.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A suspenseful journey into deadly conspiracy and murderous deception begins when a respected anti capital punishment professor who may - or may not - be guilty is charged with a brutal crime and sent to Death Row...

  • Status Quo - Hello Quo: Access All Areas Edition Blu-ray [Blu-ray] Status Quo - Hello Quo: Access All Areas Edition Blu-ray | Blu Ray | (29/10/2012) from £3.09  |  Saving you £21.90 (87.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    With 128 million worldwide album sales already under their collective belts, two OBE awards, a million neon lit 'Sold Out' signs, a record 108 appearances on Top of the Pops, this will never be beaten or even equalled! You'd think that HRH Prince Charles favourite band had nothing more to prove in the field of entertainment... But, they've never in all their long and glorious history been seen on a cinema screen...

  • Jack Rosenthal at the BBC Collection [DVD] Jack Rosenthal at the BBC Collection | DVD | (04/04/2011) from £18.35  |  Saving you £17.30 (48.10%)  |  RRP £35.99

    Jack Rosenthal's name stands high in the list of television's greatest dramatists. With a career that started on early episodes of Coronation Street he was well-advised to launch into writing plays and began by drawing on his own experiences in The Evacuees directed by a young Alan Parker. Jack Rosenthal brought to his writing knowledge of and love for the everyman; the man or woman in the street the worker labourer taxi driver parent and child. Witty insightful rich in irony and human observation even his villains reveal a human side he couldn't resist exploring. These five plays capture a playwright at his zenith in a range of work that speaks both to his experience and his empathy. Featuring Maureen Lipman Maria Charles Adrienne Posta Jonathan Lynn John Duttine Tom Wilkinson Anna Carteret and Laura Howard they are sure to be treasured by anyone who appreciates fine drama - or anyone who simply enjoys life.

  • Pink Floyd - The Wall [1982] Pink Floyd - The Wall | DVD | (05/06/2006) from £16.98  |  Saving you £-2.99 (-21.40%)  |  RRP £13.99

    By any rational measure, Alan Parker's cinematic interpretation of Pink Floyd's The Wall is a glorious failure. Glorious because its imagery is hypnotically striking, frequently resonant and superbly photographed by the gifted cinematographer Peter Biziou. And a failure because the entire exercise is hopelessly dour, loyal to the bleak themes and psychological torment of Roger Waters' great musical opus, and yet utterly devoid of the humour that Waters certainly found in his own material. Any attempt to visualise The Wall would be fraught with artistic danger, and Parker succumbs to his own self-importance, creating a film that's as fascinating as it is flawed. The film is, for better and worse, the fruit of three artists in conflict--Parker indulging himself, and Waters in league with designer Gerald Scarfe, whose brilliant animated sequences suggest that he should have directed and animated this film in its entirety. Fortunately, this clash of talent and ego does not prevent The Wall from being a mesmerising film. Boomtown Rats frontman Bob Geldof (in his screen debut) is a fine choice to play Waters's alter ego--an alienated, "comfortably numb" rock star whose psychosis manifests itself as an emotional (and symbolically physical) wall between himself and the cold, cruel world. Weaving Waters's autobiographical details into his own jumbled vision, Parker ultimately fails to combine a narrative thread with experimental structure. It's a rich, bizarre, and often astonishing film that will continue to draw a following, but the real source of genius remains the music of Roger Waters. --Jeff Shannon

  • Midnight Express [1978] Midnight Express | DVD | (11/06/2007) from £6.99  |  Saving you £-4.77 (-79.60%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Forever embroiled in controversy, Midnight Express divides viewers into opposing camps: those who think it's one of the most intense real-life dramas ever made, and those who abhor its manipulative tactics and alteration of facts for the exploitative purpose of achieving a desired effect. That effect is powerfully achieved, regardless of how you may feel about director Alan Parker and Oscar-winning screenwriter Oliver Stone's interpretation of the story of Billy Hayes. It was the American Hayes--played by the late Brad Davis in an unforgettable performance--who was caught smuggling 2kg of hashish while attempting to board a flight from Istanbul in 1970. He was sentenced to four years in a hellish Turkish prison on a drug possession charge, but his sentence was later extended (though not by 30 years, as the film suggests), and Hayes endured unthinkable brutality and torture before his escape in 1975. Unquestionably, this is a superbly crafted film, provoking a visceral response that's powerful enough to boil your blood. By the time Hayes erupts in an explosion of self-defensive violence, Parker and Stone have proven the power--and danger--of their skill. Their film is deeply manipulative, extremely xenophobic, and embellishes reality to heighten its calculated impact. Is that a crime? Not necessarily, and there's no doubt that Midnight Express is expertly directed and blessed with exceptional supporting performances (especially from John Hurt as a long-term prisoner). Still, it's obvious that strings are being pulled, and Parker, while applying his talent to a nefarious purpose, is a masterful puppeteer. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

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