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Alfred Hitchcock

  • Dial M for Murder Dial M for Murder | DVD | (01/11/2004) from £4.75  |  Saving you £3.24 (40.60%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Classic Hitchcock movie starring Grace Kelly & Ray Milland. Ex-tennis pro Tony Wendice decides to murder his wife for her money and because she had an affair the year before. He blackmails an old college associate to strangle her, but when things go wrong he sees a way to turn events to his advantage.

  • North By Northwest [1959] North By Northwest | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.45  |  Saving you £8.54 (61.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    A strong candidate for possibly the most entertaining and enjoyable film ever made by a Hollywood studio, North by Northwest is positioned between the much heavier and more profoundly disturbing Vertigo (1958) and the stark horror of Psycho (1960). In the corpus of Alfred Hitchcock films it shows the director at his most effervescent in a romantic comedy-thriller that also features one of the definitive Cary Grant performances. Which is not to say that this is just "Hitchcock Lite". It's a classic Hitchcock Wrong Man scenario: Grant is Roger O Thornhill (initials ROT), an advertising executive who is mistaken by enemy spies for a US undercover agent named George Kaplan. Convinced these sinister fellows (James Mason as the boss and Martin Landau as his henchman) are trying to kill him, Roger flees and meets a sexy Stranger on a Train (Eva Marie Saint), with whom he engages in one of the longest, most convolutedly choreographed kisses in screen history. And of course there are the famous set pieces: the stabbing at the United Nations, the crop-duster plane attack in the cornfield (where a pedestrian has no place to hide) and the cliffhanger finale atop the stone faces of Mount Rushmore. With its sparkling Ernest Lehman script and that pulse-quickening Bernard Herrmann score, what more could a filmgoer possibly desire? --Jim Emerson, Amazon.com On the DVD: This wide-screen print of the movie looks remarkably fresh, preserving the vivid depth of the original's VistaVision cinematography. The main extra feature is a new and entertaining 40-minute documentary hosted by Eva Marie Saint in which most of the surviving cast and crew give their insights into the making of the picture (we learn for example that canny Cary Grant charged 15 cents per autograph). Screenwriter Ernest Lehman provides an audio commentary and on a separate audio-only track Bernard Herrmann's masterful score can be heard in its entirety. There's also a stills gallery and trailers. --Mark Walker

  • Shadow Of A Doubt [1942] Shadow Of A Doubt | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £4.72  |  Saving you £5.27 (52.80%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Alfred Hitchcock considered this 1943 thriller to be his personal favourite among his own films, and although it's not as popular as some of Hitchcock's later work, it's certainly worthy of the master's admiration. Scripted by playwright Thornton Wilder and inspired by the actual case of a 1920s serial killer known as "The Merry Widow Murderer," Shadow of a Doubt sets a tone of menace and fear by introducing a psychotic killer into the small-town comforts of Santa Rosa, California. That's where young Charlie (Teresa Wright) lives with her parents and two younger siblings, and where murder is little more than a topic of morbid conversation for their mystery-buff neighbour (Hume Cronyn). Charlie was named after her favourite uncle, who has just arrived for an extended visit, and at first Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) gets along famously with his admiring niece. But the film's chilling prologue has already revealed Uncle Charlie's true identity as the notorious Merry Widow Murderer, and the suspense grows almost unbearable when young Charlie's trust gives way to gradual dread and suspicion. Through narrow escapes and a climactic scene aboard a speeding train, this witty thriller strips away the fa ade of small-town tranquillity to reveal evil where it's least expected. And, of course, it's all done in pure Hitchcockian style. --Jeff Shannon

  • To Catch a Thief [DVD] [1955] To Catch a Thief | DVD | (14/01/2013) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The French Riviera… two luminous stars (Grace Kelly, Cary Grant)… and the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, behind the camera. They all add up to one romantic, dazzling screen thriller. Grant plays John Robie, a retired jewel thief once known as 'The Cat', who catches the eye of Frances Stevens (Kelly), a pampered, vacationing heiress. But when a new rash of gem thefts occurs amongst the luxury hotels of the spectacular French playground, it appears that 'The Cat' is on the prowl once again. Is Robie truly reformed? Or is he deviously using Frances to gain access to the tempting collection of fabulous jewellery belonging to her mother (Jessie Royce Landis)? Romantic sparks fly as the suspense builds in this glittering Hitchcock classic that nabbed an Oscar for Best Cinematography. Special Features: Commentary by Peter Bogdanovich and Laurent Bouzereau Featurettes: 1.) Writing and Casting To Catch A Thief 2.) The Making Of To Catch A Thief 3.) Alfred Hitchcock and To Catch A Thief: An Appreciation 4.) Edith Head- The Paramount Years Featurette Theatrical Trailer

  • Psycho (1960) Psycho (1960) | DVD | (20/02/2006) from £5.59  |  Saving you £10.40 (65.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Alfred Hitchcock's landmark masterpiece of the macabre stars Anthony Perkins as the troubled Norman Bates whose old dark house and adjoining motel are not the place to spend a quiet evening. No one knows that better than Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) the ill-fated traveller whose journey ends in the notorious ""shower scene"". First a private detective then Marion's sister (Vera Miles) searches for her the horror and the suspense mount to a terrifying climax where the mysterious killer is finally revealed. It took seven days to shoot the shower scene seventy camera setups for the forty-five seconds of this now famous footage - and not an actual bare breast or plunging knife is to be found in the final cut just illusion through montage.

  • Rebecca Rebecca | DVD | (01/01/2008) from £4.08  |  Saving you £1.91 (31.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Whilst on holiday, young timid ladies companion (Joan Fontaine) meets handsome and wealthy widower Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) whose wife Rebecca has recently died in a boating accident.The two fall in love and marry. However, her joy is short lived when she returns to the de Winter estate and soon discovers that Rebecca still has a strange, unearthly hold over everyone there.

  • Rear Window [1954] Rear Window | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £4.19  |  Saving you £7.80 (65.10%)  |  RRP £11.99

    Like the Greenwich Village courtyard view from its titular portal, Alfred Hitchcock's classic Rear Window is both confined and multileveled: its story and visual perspective are dictated by its protagonist's imprisonment in his apartment, convalescing in a wheelchair, from which both he and the audience observe the lives of his neighbours. Cheerful voyeurism, as well as the behaviour glimpsed among the various tenants, affords a droll comic atmosphere that gradually darkens when he sees clues to what may be a murder. Photographer LB "Jeff" Jeffries (James Stewart) is, in fact, a voyeur by trade, a professional photographer sidelined by an accident while on assignment. His immersion in the human drama (and comedy) visible from his window is a by-product of boredom, underlined by the disapproval of his girlfriend, Lisa (Grace Kelly), and a wisecracking visiting nurse (Thelma Ritter). Yet when the invalid wife of Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr) disappears, Jeff enlists the two women to help him to determine whether she's really left town, as Thorwald insists, or been murdered. Hitchcock scholar Donald Spoto convincingly argues that the crime at the centre of this mystery is the MacGuffin--a mere pretext--in a film that's more interested in the implications of Jeff's sentinel perspective. We actually learn more about the lives of the other neighbours (given generic names by Jeff, even as he's drawn into their lives) he, and we, watch undetected than we do the putative murderer and his victim. Jeff's evident fear of intimacy and commitment with the elegant, adoring Lisa provides the other vital thread to the script, one woven not only into the couple's own relationship, but reflected and even commented upon through the various neighbours' lives. At a minimum, Hitchcock's skill at making us accomplices to Jeff's spying, coupled with an ingenious escalation of suspense as the teasingly vague evidence coalesces into ominous proof, deliver a superb thriller spiked with droll humour, right up to its nail-biting, nightmarish climax. At deeper levels, however, Rear Window plumbs issues of moral responsibility and emotional honesty, while offering further proof (were any needed) of the director's brilliance as a visual storyteller. -- Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com

  • The Hitchcock Collection: 4 DVD Set (Rebecca/Notorious/Spellbound/The Paradine Case) [DVD] The Hitchcock Collection: 4 DVD Set (Rebecca/Notorious/Spellbound/The Paradine Case) | DVD | (31/03/2014) from £10.48  |  Saving you £2.51 (19.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Box set containing the four films director Alfred Hitchcock made with legendary Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. In <i>Rebecca</i>, Joan Fontaine stars as a young woman who, after a brief Monte Carlo courtship and a rushed marriage, returns with the handsome and mysterious Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) to his Cornish country estate, Manderlay. The new bride receives a hostile reaction from the housekeeper Mrs Danvers (Judith Anderson), and finds herself intimidated and overcome by ...

  • Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Box Set [Blu-ray] [1942][Region Free] Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece Collection Box Set | Blu Ray | (12/11/2012) from £29.99  |  Saving you £100.00 (76.90%)  |  RRP £129.99

    The Ultimate Collection of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, including Psycho, Vertigo, Frenzy, Rear Window and The Birds come together on Blu-ray in perfect High-Definition picture and sound. With hours of bonus features.Saboteur: Aircraft factory worker Barry Kane goes on the run across the United States when he is wrongly accused of a fire that killed his best friend.Shadow of a Doubt: A young woman discovers her visiting Uncle Charlie may not be the man he initially seemed to be.Rope: Two young men strangle their classmate, hide his body in their apartment and invite his closest friends and family to a dinner party as a means to challenge the perfection of their crime.Rear Window: A wheelchair bound photographer spies on his neighbours from his window and becomes convinced one of them has committed a serious murder.The Trouble with Harry: The trouble with Harry is that everyone seems to have a different idea of what needs to be done with his body.The Man Who Knew Too Much: A family holidaying in Morocco stumble on to an assassination plot and the conspirators are determined to prevent them from interfering.Vertigo: A San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the activities of an old friend's wife, whilst becoming dangerously obsessed with her.Psycho: A young woman steals $40,000 from her client and subsequently encounters a young motel proprietor who has been too long under the presence and domination of his mother.The Birds: A wealthy San Francisco socialite pursues a potential boyfriend to a Northern California town that takes a bizarre turn when birds of all kinds begin to attack people in increasing numbers and with increasing viciousness.Marnie: Mark marries Marnie, although she is a thief and possesses serious psychological problems, Mark tries to help her confront and resolve the issues.Torn Curtain: An American scientist defects to East Germany as part of a cloak and dagger mission to find the solution for a formula resin and has to figure out a plan to escape back West.Topaz: A French intelligence agent becomes embroiled in Cold War politics first uncovering the events leading up to the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, and then back to France to break up a Russian spy ring.Frenzy: A serial killer is murdering women in London with a necktie, the police have a suspect but he isn't the correct man...Family Plot: Suspense film about a phony psychic/con artist and her taxi driver/private investigator boyfriend who encounter a pair of serial kidnappers while following a missing heir in California.

  • Alfred Hitchcock - Essential Collection [DVD] Alfred Hitchcock - Essential Collection | DVD | (05/09/2011) from £11.29  |  Saving you £38.70 (77.40%)  |  RRP £49.99

    Titles Comprise:Rear Window: When professional photographer J.B. Jeff Jeffries (James Stewart) is confined to a wheelchair with a broken leg, he becomes obsessed with watching the private dramas of his neighbours play out across the courtyard. When he suspects a salesman may have murdered his nagging wife, Jeffries enlists the help of his glamorous socialite girlfriend (Grace Kelly) to investigate the highly suspicious chain of events that lead to one of the most memorable and gripping endings in all of film history.The Birds: As beautiful blonde Melanie Daniels ('Tippi' Hedren) rolls into Bodega Bay in pursuit of eligible bachelor Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor), she is inexplicably attacked by a seagull. Suddenly thousands of birds areflocking into town, preying on school-children and residents in a terrifying series of attacks. Soon Mitch and Melanie are fighting for their lives against a deadly force that can't be explained and can't be stopped in one of Hollywood's most horrific films of nature gone berserk.Vertigo: Set in San Francisco, James Stewart portrays an acrophobic detective hired to trail a friend's suicidal wife (Kim Novak). After he successfully rescues her from a leap into the bay, he finds himself becoming obsessed with the beautifully troubled woman. One of cinema's most chilling romantic endeavours - this film is a must for collectors.Psycho: Anthony Perkins stars in Alfred Hitchcock's landmark masterpiece as the troubled Norman Bates whose old dark house and adjoining motel are not the place to spend a quiet evening. Janet Leigh plays Marion Crane, the ill-fated traveller whose journey ends in the notorious shower scene. Horror and suspense mount to a terrifying climax where the mysterious killer is finally revealed after both Marion's sister and a private detective search for her.

  • Hitchcock Complete Boxset Hitchcock Complete Boxset | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £26.99  |  Saving you £63.00 (70.00%)  |  RRP £89.99

    From the 'Master of Suspense' this box set features many of his very best films. Titles comprise: 1. Vertigo 2. The Birds 3. Rear Window 4. Marnie 5. Frenzy 6. Topaz 7. The Trouble With Harry 8. Torn Curtain 9. Psycho: Special Edition (includes the Bonus disc the Hitchcock legacy) 10. Family Plot 11. Saboteur 12. Shadow Of A Doubt 13. The Man Who Knew Too Much 14. Rope For individual synopses please refer to the individual products.

  • Alfred Hitchcock - Master Of Suspense [DVD] Alfred Hitchcock - Master Of Suspense | DVD | (28/09/2009) from £10.98  |  Saving you £9.01 (45.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Titles Comprise 1. Dial M For Murder: Ex-tennis pro Tony Wendice decides to murder his wife for her money as revenge for an affair she had the year before. He blackmails an old college associate to strangle her but when things go wrong he sees a way to turn events to his advantage. 2. I Confess: Otto Kellar and his wife Alma work as caretaker and housekeeper at a Catholic church in Quebec. Whilst robbing a house where he sometimes works as a gardener Otto is caught and kills the owner. Racked with guilt he heads back to the church where Father Michael Logan is working late. Otto confesses his crime but when the police begin to suspect Father Logan he cannot reveal what he has been told in the confession 3. Stage Fright: Jonathan Cooper is wanted by the police who suspect him of killing his lover's husband. His friend Eve Gill offers to hide him and Jonathan explains to her that his lover actress Charlotte Inwood is the real murderer. Eve decides to investigate for herself but when she meets the detective in charge of the case she starts to fall in love. 4. The Wrong Man: Manny Ballestero is an honest hardworking musician at New York's Stork Club. When his wife needs money for dental treatment Manny goes to the local insurance office to borrow on her policy. Employees at the office mistake him for a hold-up man who robbed them the year before and the police are called. 5. Strangers On A Train: A battle of wits between tennis pro Guy and his mysterious sycophantic admirer Bruno arises when Bruno proposes a criss-cross scheme of traded murders. Bruno agrees to kill Guy's unfaithful wife in return for which Guy will (or so it seems) kill Bruno's spiteful father. 6. North By Northwest: Grant plays a Manhattan advertising executive plunged into a realm of spy and counterspy and variously abducted framed for murder chased and in another signature set piece crop-dusted. He also holds on for dear life from that famed carved rock.

  • Frenzy [1972] Frenzy | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £6.80  |  Saving you £3.19 (31.90%)  |  RRP £9.99

    By the time Alfred Hitchcock's second-to-last picture came out in 1972, the censorship restrictions under which he had laboured during his long career had eased up. Now he could give full sway to his lurid fantasies, and that may explain why Frenzy is the director's most violent movie by far--outstripping even Psycho for sheer brutality. Adapted by playwright Anthony Shaffer, the story concerns a series of rape-murders committed by suave fruit-merchant Bob Rusk (Barry Foster), who gets his kicks from throttling women with a necktie. This being a Hitchcock thriller, suspicion naturally falls on the wrong man--ill-tempered publican Richard Blaney (Jon Finch). Enter Inspector Oxford from New Scotland Yard (Alex McCowan), who thrashes out the finer points of the case with his wife (Vivian Merchant), whose tireless enthusiasm for indigestible delicacies like quail with grapes supplies a classic running gag.Frenzy was the first film Hitchcock had shot entirely in his native Britain since Jamaica Inn (1939), and many contemporary critics used that fact to account for what seemed to them a glorious return to form after a string of Hollywood duds (Marnie, Torn Curtain, Topaz). Hitchcock specialists are often less wild about it, judging the detective plot mechanical and the oh-so-English tone insufferable. But at least three sequences rank among the most skin-crawling the maestro ever put on celluloid. There is an astonishing moment when the camera backs away from a room in which a murder is occurring, down the stairs, through the front door and then across the street to join the crowd milling indifferently on the pavement. There is also the killer's nerve-wracking attempt to retrieve his tiepin from a corpse stuffed into a sack of potatoes. Finally, there is one act of strangulation so prolonged and gruesome it verges on the pornographic. Was the veteran film-maker a rampant misogynist as feminist observers have frequently charged? Sit through this appalling scene if you dare and decide for yourself. --Peter Matthews

  • The Birds [1963] The Birds | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £5.98  |  Saving you £4.01 (40.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Vacationing in northern California, Alfred Hitchcock was struck by a story in a Santa Cruz newspaper: "Seabird Invasion Hits Coastal Homes". From this peculiar incident, and his memory of a short story by Daphne du Maurier, the master of suspense created one of his strangest and most terrifying films. The Birds follows a chic blonde, Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), as she travels to the coastal town of Bodega Bay to hook up with a rugged fellow (Rod Taylor) she's only just met. Before long the town is attacked by marauding birds, and Hitchcock's skill at staging action is brought to the fore. Beyond the superb effects, however, The Birds is also one of Hitchcock's most psychologically complicated scenarios, a tense study of violence, loneliness, and complacency. What really gets under your skin are not the bird skirmishes but the anxiety and the eerie quiet between attacks. The director elevated an unknown model, Tippi Hedren (mother of Melanie Griffith), to being his latest cool, blond leading lady, an experience that was not always easy on the much-pecked Ms. Hedren. Still, she returned for the next Hitchcock picture, the underrated Marnie. Treated with scant attention by serious critics in 1963, The Birds has grown into a classic and--despite the sci-fi trappings--one of Hitchcock's most serious films. --Robert Horton

  • The 39 Steps [1935] The 39 Steps | DVD | (19/06/2007) from £3.85  |  Saving you £12.14 (75.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A high point of Hitchcock's pre-Hollywood career, 1935's The Thirty-Nine Steps is the first and best of three film versions of John Buchan's rather stiff novel. Robert Donat plays Richard Hannay, who becomes embroiled in a plot to steal military secrets. He finds himself on the run; falsely accused of murder, while also pursuing the dastardly web of spies alluded to in the title. With a plot whose twists and turns match the hilly Scottish terrain in which much of the film is set, The Thirty-Nine Steps combines a breezy suavity with a palpable psychological tension. Hitchcock was already a master at conveying such tension through his cinematic methods, rather than relying just on situation or dialogue. Sometimes his ways of bringing the best out of his actors brought the worst out in himself. If the scene in which Donat is handcuffed to co-star Madeline Carroll has a certain edge, for instance, that's perhaps because the director mischievously cuffed them together in a rehearsal, then left them attached for a whole afternoon, pretending to have lost the key. The movie also introduces Hitchcock's favoured plot device, the "McGuffin" (here, the military secret), the unexplained device or "non-point" on which the movie turns. --David Stubbs

  • Strangers On  A Train (1951) Strangers On A Train (1951) | DVD | (09/04/2001) from £4.75  |  Saving you £9.24 (66.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    From its cleverly choreographed opening sequence to its heart-stopping climax on a rampant carousel, this 1951 Hitchcock classic readily earns its reputation as one of the director's finest examples of timeless cinematic suspense. It's not just a ripping-good thriller but a film student's delight and a perversely enjoyable battle of wits between tennis pro Guy (Farley Granger) and his mysterious, sycophantic admirer, Bruno (Robert Walker), who proposes a "criss-cross" scheme of traded murders. Bruno agrees to kill Guy's unfaithful wife, in return for which Guy will (or so it seems) kill Bruno's spiteful father. With an emphasis on narrative and visual strategy, Hitchcock controls the escalating tension with a master's flair for cinematic design, and the plot (coscripted by Raymond Chandler) is so tightly constructed that you'll be white-knuckled even after multiple viewings. Strangers on a Train remains one of Hitchcock's crowning achievements and a suspenseful classic that never loses its capacity to thrill and delight. --Jeff Shannon

  • Vertigo [1958] Vertigo | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £4.29  |  Saving you £5.70 (57.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Dreamlike and nightmarishly surreal, Vertigo is Hitchcock's most personal film because it confronts many of the convoluted psychological issues that haunted and fascinated the director. The psychological complexity and the stark truthfulness of their rampant emotions keeps these strangely obsessive characters alive on screen, and Hitchcock understood better than most their barely repressed sexual compulsions, their fascination with death and their almost overwhelming desire for transcendent love. James Stewart finds profound and disturbing new depths in his psyche as Scotty, the tortured acrophobic detective on the trail of a suicidal woman apparently possessed by the ghost of someone long dead. Kim Novak is the classical Hitchcockian blonde whose icy exterior conceals a churning, volcanic emotional core. The agonised romance of Bernard Herrmann's score accompanies the two actors as a third and vitally important character, moving the film along to its culmination in an ecstasy of Wagnerian tragedy. Of course Hitch lavished especial care on every aspect of the production, from designer Edith Head's costumes (he, like Scotty, was most insistent on the grey dress), to the specific colour scheme of each location, to the famous reverse zoom "Vertigo" effect (much imitated, never bettered). The result is Hitch's greatest work and an undisputed landmark of cinema history. On the DVD: This disc presents the superb restored print of this film in a wonderful widescreen (1.85:1) anamorphic transfer, with remastered Dolby digital soundtrack. There's a half-hour documentary made in 1996 about the painstaking two-year restoration process, plus an informative commentary from the restorers Robert Harris and James Katz, who are joined by original producer Herbert Coleman. There are also text features on the production, cast and crew, plus a trailer for the theatrical release of the restoration. This is an undeniably essential requirement for every DVD collection. --Mark Walker

  • Rear Window [Blu-ray] [1954][Region Free] Rear Window | Blu Ray | (13/05/2013) from £10.63  |  Saving you £2.99 (19.90%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Alfred Hitchcock playfully explores the role of the voyeur in one of his best-loved suspense thrillers. After breaking his leg during a shoot, photo-journalist L.B. 'Jeff' Jeffries (James Stewart) is forced to spend a humid summer recuperating in his Greenwich Village apartment. The wheelchair-bound Jeff whiles away his time observing his neighbours through a telephoto lens, bestowing them with nicknames and growing familiar with their daily routines. However, his society girlfriend Lisa (Grace Kelly) is exasperated and then alarmed when Jeff becomes obsessed with the notion that Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr), who lives in the apartment opposite, has murdered his wife. A 53-minute making of feature, 'Rear Window Ethics', is also included. Special Features: Rear Window Ethics: An Original Documentary A Conversation with Screenwriter John Michael Hayes Pure Cinema: Through the Eyes of The Master Breaking Barriers: The Sound of Hitchcock Rear Window Re-Release Trailer Narrated by James Stewart Feature Commentary with John Fawell Author of Hitchcock's Rear Window

  • Rope [1948] Rope | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £6.29  |  Saving you £3.70 (37.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    James Stewart stars with Farley Granger and John Dall in this highly charged 1948 Alfred Hitchcock thriller that has intrigued fans because of its chilling subject based on a true story and its unique 'unedited' cinematic style. Granger and Dall are two friends who strangle a classmate for intellectual thrills and then proceed to invite his family and mutual friends for dinner - with the body stuffed inside the trunk they use for a buffet table. Their former teacher (Stewart) suspects wrongdoing. Before the night is over he finds out how brutally his students have twisted his own academic theories.

  • Spellbound Spellbound | DVD | (01/01/2008) from £4.08  |  Saving you £1.91 (31.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Spellbound was nominated for six Academy Awards and won the Oscar for its original score. Based on Francis Beeding's novel 'The House of Dr. Edwards', it is one of Hitchcock's finest films, full of classic plot twists and featuring a riveting dream sequence by Salvador Dali.Having retired from his position as head of the Green Manors Mental Asylum, Dr. Murchison assigns famous psychiatrist Dr. Edwards (Gregory Peck) as his replacement.There, Dr. Edwards becomes attracted to the beautiful but cold Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman) who soon realises that he is in fact a paranoid amnesiac imposter and sets about to cure him whilst solving the mystery of what happened to the real Dr. Edwards.

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