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Director George Cukor

  • My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration [Blu-ray] [1964] My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration | Blu Ray | (11/07/2016) from £9.09  |  Saving you £10.90 (54.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    More lovely than ever! Restored in 4K from 8K scans of original 65 mm elements with 96K resolution English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD audio, this 50th ANNIVERSARY EDITION celebrates the breathtaking musical extravaganza that won 8 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. This beloved adaptation of the Broadway stage hit stars AUDREY HEPBURN as Eliza Doolittle, a sassy, working-class London street vendor, and REX HARRISON as the elitist Professor Higgins, who attempts to turn Eliza into a sophisticated lady through proper tutoring. But, when the humble flower girl blossoms into the toast of London society, her teacher may have a lesson or two to learn himself

  • The Philadelphia Story [1940] The Philadelphia Story | DVD | (20/06/2005) from £4.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (68.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Witty sparkling and bright adaptation of Philip Barry's hit Broadway play about the rich upper class becoming blinded to the simple joys of life. The story centers around socialite Tracy Lord (Hepburn) and husband C. K. Dexter Haven (Grant) whom she's thrown out of their Main Line mansion. Tracy is on the verge of marrying a wealthy stuffed shirt much safer than Dex whom starts trying to win Tracy's heart again. Meanwhile Mike Connor (Stewart) a tabloid reporter also falls for Tr

  • Gone With The Wind Gone With The Wind | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £3.95  |  Saving you £9.00 (64.30%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Gone with the Wind is a sprawling mosaic of a picture, one of the best-loved and most successful in movie history, but also one of the most frustrating. Wonderfully epic in scope, the decline and fall of the antebellum South as seen through the eyes of feisty, independent and wilful heroine Scarlett O'Hara makes the first half of the picture an absolutely riveting spectacle. From the aristocratic old world of Tara to the horrors of Atlanta under siege, Gone with the Wind features any number of indelible scenes and images: the genteel girls taking an enforced siesta during the Twelve Oaks barbecue, a horrified Scarlett walking through the wounded, the flight from burning Atlanta, and Scarlett's moving pledge against a burnished sunset set to Max Steiner's glorious music score. But the second half shifts gear, the melodramatic quotient is upped yet further as tragedy piles upon tragedy, and despite its unwieldy length everything feels rushed. Add to that the central problem that the audience never really understands, why Scarlett could ever fall for weak-chinned Ashley in the first place, and the picture begins to unravel unsatisfactorily. Behind the scenes problems doubtless contributed, with directors coming and going, Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable apparently barely able to stand the sight of each other, and producer David O Selznick's endless rewrites and interference. Nonetheless, this 1939 box-office smash remains one of Hollywood's finest achievements, an irresistible spectacle chock-full of the finest stars in the filmic firmament striking sparks off one another. They really don't make 'em like this anymore. On the DVD: No extra features on this DVD, which is a pity given the amount of material that must be available, but it has to be admitted this disc is worth the asking price simply to drink in the astonishing quality of the picture, sumptuously presented in its original 1.33:1 "Academy" ratio. The mono sound is vivid, too, showcasing Max Steiner's headily romantic score. --Mark Walker

  • The Philadelphia Story [The Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [1998] The Philadelphia Story | Blu Ray | (13/11/2017) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    James Stewart, Cary Grant, and the unstoppable Katharine Hepburn star in Hollywood's greatest romantic comedy With this furiously witty comedy of manners, KATHARINE HEPBURN (Woman of the Year) revitalized her career and cemented her status as the era's most iconic leading lady thanks in great part to her own shrewd orchestrations. While starring in the PHILIP BARRY stage play The Philadelphia Story, Hepburn snapped up the screen rights, handpicking her friend GEORGE CUKOR (Adam's Rib) to direct. The intoxicating screenplay by DONALD OGDEN STEWART (Holiday) pits the formidable Philadelphia socialite Tracy Lord (Hepburn, at her most luminous) against various romantic foils, chief among them her charismatic exhusband (His Girl Friday's CARY GRANT), who disrupts her imminent marriage by paying her family estate a visit, accompanied by a tabloid reporter on assignment to cover the wedding of the year (JAMES STEWART, in his only Academy Award®winning performance). A fast-talking screwball comedy as well as a tale of regrets and reconciliation, this convergence of golden-age talent is one of the greatest American films of all time. BONUS FEATURES SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack Audio commentary from 2005 featuring film scholar Jeanine Basinger New introduction to actor Katharine Hepburn's role in the development of the film by documentarians David Heeley and Joan Kramer In Search of Tracy Lord, a new documentary about the origin of the character and her social milieu Two full episodes of The Dick Cavett Show from 1973, featuring rare interviews with Hepburn, plus an excerpt of a 1978 interview from that show with director George Cukor Lux Radio Theatre adaptation of the film from 1943, featuring an introduction by filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille Restoration demonstration PLUS: An essay by critic Farran Smith Nehme

  • The Tracy & Hepburn Signature Collection (2011) [DVD] [1942] The Tracy & Hepburn Signature Collection (2011) | DVD | (19/09/2011) from £9.99  |  Saving you £19.00 (63.40%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Titles Comprise: Woman of the Year Keeper of the Flame Adam's Rib Pat And Mike

  • My Fair Lady [DVD] [1964] My Fair Lady | DVD | (14/09/2009) from £7.00  |  Saving you £5.99 (46.10%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Audrey Hepburn stars as Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl who under the guidance of Professor Higgins played by Rex Harrison becomes the Belle of British Society. Winner of 8 Academy Awards including Best Picture and blessed with an array of scintillating songs this classic movie is a feast for both the eyes and the ears and is breathtaking entertainment for the whole family.

  • Spencer Tracy / Katharine Hepburn - Signature Collection Box Set Spencer Tracy / Katharine Hepburn - Signature Collection Box Set | DVD | (17/10/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Woman of the Year (Dir. George Stevens 1942): Tess and Sam work on the same newspaper and don't like each other very much. At least the first time because they eventually fall in love and get married. But Tess is a very active woman and one of the most famous feminists in the country; she is even elected as ""the woman of the year"". Being busy all the time she forgets how to really be a woman and Sam begins to feel negleted. Pat and Mike (Dir. Goerge Cukor 1952): The sun will sneak by a rooster before sports promoter Mike Conovan (Spencer Tracy) lets opportunity pass him by. So the first time he sees genteel Pat Pemberton (Katharine Hepburn) swing a five-iron he decides to ink her to a pro contract. ""Not much meat on her "" Mike later says ""but what's there is cherce."" For this chercest of romantic comedies George Cukor directs Ruth Gordon and Garon Kanin provide the Oscar-nominated screenplay and a deft cat plays various Damon Runyonesque types including Aldo Ray as a dim-bulb palooka and Charles (Bronson) Buchinski as a tough guy who finds Pat tougher. Sports stars of the day (Like Babe Didrikson Zaharias and Gussie Moran) add to the Jocks-and-Jills fun. Let the games begin! Adam's Rib (Dir. George Cukor 1949): Assistant District Attorney Adam Bonner loves his wife Amanda but doesn't care much for his opposing counsel in a sensational attempted-murder trial - an opponent who happens to be Amanda. Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn were never more evenly matched than when they brought their sharpened wits and prickly affection to this George Cukor -- directed comedy written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin. Judy Holliday co-stars as the woman whose shooting of her philandering spouse becomes a feminist cause for Amanda. Hepburn generously saw Holliday's work as a screen test for casting the film of Holliday's stage vehicle Born Yesterday. Hepburn's ploy worked. So does this fine funny movie. Keeper Of The Flame (Dir. George Cukor 1942): ""A determined reporter. A grieving widow. A heart-pounding tale of suspense."" Spencer Tracy plays reporter Steve O'Malley who goes investigates the death of a ""national hero"" named Robert Forrest. He meets his widow Christine (Katharine Hepburn) and falls in love with her. His investigation reveals that the dead hero may have been plotting to overthrow the government and suspects that Christine may have been involved. He confronts her with his evidence and ""she refuses to speak out in her own defense."" He doesn't know if she is innocent or not.

  • Let's Make Love [Blu-ray] Let's Make Love | Blu Ray | (25/06/2018) from £19.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Let?s Make Love is a curious picture in many ways: Marilyn Monroe was the superstar, Yves Montand new to Hollywood, but she seems peripheral to the action and he's in almost every scene. Meanwhile director George Cukor, always happy with theatrical material, can't make the off-off-Broadway milieu come to believable life. In short, Let's Make Love lacks the sparkle promised by its talent roster, and for Monroe especially the bloom is off the rose. This 1960 film was her next to last, and she appears weary, although isolated moments have the old oomph (and she has a terrific romp through her first number, Cole Porter's "My Heart Belongs to Daddy"). Cameos by Milton Berle, Bing Crosby, and Gene Kelly increase the time-capsule feeling. The biggest failing is the lack of chemistry between Monroe and Montand, yet off-screen they had a romance during filming. A curious picture indeed.--Robert Horton, Amazon.com

  • My Fair Lady [1964] My Fair Lady | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £7.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £16.99

    Hollywood's legendary "woman's director", George Cukor (The Women, The Philadelphia Story), transformed Audrey Hepburn into street-urchin-turned-proper-lady Eliza Doolittle in this film version of the Lerner and Loewe musical. Based on George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, My Fair Lady stars Rex Harrison as linguist Henry Higgins (Harrison also played the role, opposite Julie Andrews, on stage), who draws Eliza into a social experiment that works almost too well. The letterbox edition of this film on video certainly pays tribute to the pageantry of Cukor's set, but it also underscores a certain visual stiffness that can slow viewer enthusiasm just a tad. But it's really star wattage that keeps My Fair Lady exciting--that and such great songs as "On the Street Where You Live" and "I Could Have Danced All Night". Actor Jeremy Brett, who gained a huge following later in life portraying Sherlock Holmes, is quite electric as Eliza's determined suitor. --Tom Keogh

  • Cary Grant - Screen Legends Cary Grant - Screen Legends | DVD | (05/06/2006) from £6.99  |  Saving you £5.41 (21.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The Awful Truth (Dir. Leo McCarey 1937): Love is a comic battlefield especially when presided over by two superbly-matched sparring partners Cary Grant and Irene Dunne. A classic screwball Hollywood romp! Bringing Up Baby (Dir. Howard Hawks 1938): A dog belonging to an eccentric heiress (Hepburn) steals a dinosaur bone from David (Grant) an absent-minded Zoology professor. David follows the heiress to her home and all hell breaks loose when he loses his pet leopard

  • Song Without End [DVD] Song Without End | DVD | (06/08/2013) from £3.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (69.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Stunningly filmed in Technicolor and featuring one of the finest musical scores Hollywood has ever produced, Charles Vidor's Song Without End - the 1960 biopic of the virtuoso pianist and composer Franz Liszt won both Oscar (1961) and Golden Globe awards (1961). Dirk Bogarde stars as Franz Liszt.The finest virtuoso pianist of his day, Liszt is the toast of Europe, filling concert halls from Paris to Vienna and playing command performances for the crowned heads of Europe. His interpretations of the works of the great composers are unsurpassed - but he dreams that one day his own compositions will enthrall his adoring crowds. As his fame grows, his personal life falls apart. Already involved in a scandalous affair with a French Countess (Genevieve Page), now he dreams of seducing and marrying a Russian Princess (Capucine) whose love is absolutely forbidden... A musical masterpiece, Song Without End features almost forty beautiful pieces by some of the world's greatest composers including Chopin, Beethoven,Wagner, Bach, Verdi and Schumann as well as works by Liszt himself. Solo piano pieces are performed by the maestro Jorge Bolet, with accompaniment from the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra and the Roger Wagner Chorale. Song Without End was to be the final film by Charles Vidor who died before production was complete, with his place taken by George Cukor.

  • The Wizard Of Oz [1939] The Wizard Of Oz | DVD | (19/06/2006) from £5.04  |  Saving you £9.05 (47.70%)  |  RRP £18.99

    Like the Tin Man's heart, the true test of a real classic is how much it is loved by others. The enduring charms of The Wizard of Oz have easily weathered the vicissitudes of changing fashions making the film one of the world's best-loved, most-quoted and frequently imitated movies. It's now as ubiquitous an American pop-cultural icon as McDonald's, making judging the movie purely on its own merits an almost impossible task. Judy Garland's tragic later life, for example, makes her naïve and utterly beguiling Dorothy seem all the more poignant in retrospect. But this at least is clear: much of this movie's success depends on the winning appeal of Garland's "Everygirl" figure, who creates the vital identification and empathy necessary to carry the audience with her into the land of Oz. We always care deeply about Dorothy, her quest for home and the strength of her friendship with her companions. Garland's assured dancing and singing routines with her ideally cast Broadway comedy co-stars Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr and Jack Haley are still endlessly delightful, of course, and the songs and score (by Arlen, Harburg and Stothart) are as good as anything in the Hollywood musical canon. It is Garland's deeply felt rendition of "Over the Rainbow" that is both the film's emotional core and the reason why adults as much as children the world over still respond so strongly to this movie. So long as people long for home and the love of their friends and family, the nostalgic appeal of Oz will never fade. On the DVD: another splendid digital restoration from the MGM vaults keeps this wonderful classic as vivid and alive as it was back in 1939, if not more so. The 1.33:1 picture is clear and defined, bursting with the vibrant colours of Oz (you can even see the wires holding up the Lion's tail). Even more remarkably, because the original microphone tapes have been preserved the soundtrack has been remastered in 5.1 stereo, thereby accentuating the lush tones of the MGM orchestra and Garland's famous singing. The disc is also chock full of extras, including outtakes, audio sequences, composer Harold Arlen's backstage movies, extracts from earlier silent Oz films, clips from the Academy Awards and interviews with the stars among many other fascinating nuggets. The new 50-minute documentary hosted by Angela Lansbury, and irritatingly narrated in the present tense, is oddly the weakest part, with too little hard information and too much padding about how everyone loves the movie. The only gripe is Warners' trademark cardboard slipcase, which is awkward and easily damaged. But this is still an essential disc for the young at heart everywhere. --Mark Walker

  • Adam's Rib [1949] Adam's Rib | DVD | (30/01/2013) from £5.99  |  Saving you £4.39 (29.30%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Adam's Rib, released in 1949, was one of the on-screen peaks for the matchless pairing of Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. George Cukor's instinctively light touch on the director's tiller, the wittiest of Garson Kanin scripts and apparently effortless acting from the stars, merge for 100 minutes of sophisticated comic perfection. It's tempting to think that, as the sparring husband and wife lawyers, Hepburn and Tracy drew on aspects of their now legendary real-life love affair. Screen chemistry alone can't account for the endless nuances, sidelong looks and timing which make Adam's Rib such a delight. There's also a generosity to their fellow actors that few major stars, then or now, would be confident enough to indulge in. Judy Holliday, playing the wife accused of shooting her philandering husband, had still not secured the lead in the film of her Broadway hit, Born Yesterday. Aware that anything else would have been a travesty, Hepburn as her defence lawyer ensured that Holliday was favoured in their scenes together and she duly got the part. In all the best ways, Adam's Rib is a quick-fire battle-of-the-sexes comedy, with Hepburn's brittle feminism striking sparks off Tracy's bemused chauvinism. The verdict might be a victory for Hepburn, but the real winner is an underlying love and respect which made this partnership one of the all time greats. On the DVD: Adam's Rib is presented in standard 4:3 format from a decent print, with a picture quality and mono soundtrack to please anyone who knows the film primarily from TV matinees. The lack of extras, apart from a scene index, is disappointing for a film of this stature. --Piers Ford

  • My Fair Lady -- 40th Anniversary Special Edition (2 discs) [1964] My Fair Lady -- 40th Anniversary Special Edition (2 discs) | DVD | (05/04/2004) from £10.71  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Audrey Hepburn stars as Eliza Doolittle a poor flower girl who under the guidance of Professor Higgins played by Rex Harrison becomes the Belle of British Society. Winner of 8 Academy Awards including Best Picture and blessed with an array of scintillating songs this classic movie is a feast for both the eyes and the ears and is breathtaking entertainment for the whole family.

  • A Star Is Born - 2 Disc Special Edition [1954] A Star Is Born - 2 Disc Special Edition | DVD | (10/02/2003) from £4.49  |  Saving you £9.50 (67.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    A musical remake of the classic 1937 film of the same name, A Star is Born was designed as Judy Garland's comeback vehicle after she had been cruelly axed by MGM studios for professional unreliability. Her erratic moods caused serious production delays this time around, too, but the behind-the-scenes turmoil was certainly worth it--Garland gives just about the greatest one-woman show in movie history. The story is the stuff of pure Hollywood legend. Aspiring actress-singer Esther Blodgett meets fading matinee idol Norman Maine (James Mason), who navigates her to stardom under the more melodious handle of Vickie Lester. As she rises meteorically, he declines into alcoholic self-pity--and the result, if you haven't guessed, is plenty of heartbreak. Mason lends subtle support in a role Cary Grant refused as too downbeat for his image, but Garland grabs centre stage with an all-out emotional performance that rivets the attention. Director George Cukor was famous for coaxing the very best out of screen divas, and A Star is Born must be counted as his crowning achievement. The lush visual style that he contributes provides a suitable setting for Garland's deep, rich voice--throbbing with melancholy in the Harold Arlen-Ira Gershwin ballad "The Man That Got Away", then capering joyfully in the gargantuan musical number "Born in a Trunk". Moss Hart's script takes many cynical swipes at the pretensions of Tinsel Town--perhaps too many for the taste of studio boss Jack Warner, who ordered drastic cuts in the film after its premiere. --Peter Matthews

  • Gaslight [1944] Gaslight | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £3.88  |  Saving you £10.11 (72.30%)  |  RRP £13.99

    In 1944, Ingrid Bergman took home a Best Actress Oscar for her work as the neurotic, persecuted wife in Gaslight, a thundering melodrama based on the play by Patrick Hamilton. At the heart of the piece is a splendidly cruel scenario as a husband (Charles Boyer) subtly drives his wife out of her mind in a house suffocating with Victorian clutter. But MGM production gloss and George Cukor's broad strokes direction make this a less affecting, suspenseful effort than the 1939 British film version with Anton Walbrook and Diana Wynyard. Bergman has a succession of big, impressive mad scenes that show off her acting muscles--and is given the full Hollywood glamour lighting and costuming to highlight her personal beauty--while Boyer comes alive as he salivates over the missing jewels. The best work comes from a teenage Angela Lansbury (in her screen debut) as an impudent, sexy-sinister maidservant, undermining her mistress at every turn and pouting to perfection. On the DVD: Gaslight on disc includes a trailer, a newsreel snippet of Bergman getting her Oscar and a nice featurette with Pia Lindstrom (Bergman's daughter) and Lansbury talking about the film. --Kim Newman

  • Greta Garbo Collection [DVD] Greta Garbo Collection | DVD | (12/10/2009) from £12.92  |  Saving you £2.07 (13.80%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Titles Comprise: Anna Christie (1930): Garbo made her landmark transition to Talkies with this film playing a former prostitute whose past threatens her chance for happiness. A different director and cast join Garbo in a German-language version (Side B with English subtitles) filmed on the same sound stages immediately after the English version. Later Garbo called it the better film and this new DVD release gives fans the rare opportunity to compare the two versions. Mata Hari (1931): Garbo is mesmerizing as a dancer turned German secret agent in wartime Paris seething with secrets and betrayal. The notable supporting cast includes Lionel Barrymore as a Russian general in love with her Lewis Stone as an icy master spy and Ramon Novarro as a handsome aviator who wins the heart Mata Hari did not know she possessed. Queen Christina (1933): To escape the burdens of the monarchy Sweden's Queen Christina (Garbo) rides into the countryside disguised as a boy. She meets and secretly falls for a dashing Spanish envoy on his way to the royal court. When her lover's true identity is revealed Christina knows her people will not accept her marriage to a foreigner. Torn between her duty and her heart she must make a fateful decision. Garbo is luminous in this lavish costume drama starring with her one-time off-screen fianc'' John Gilbert under the direction of Rouben Mamoulian. Anna Karenina (1935): Leo Tolstoy's novel of a dutiful wife and doting mother who gives up her life of contentment to experience real passion receives sumptuous treatment in a David O. Selznick production. Clarence Brown directs a stellar cast - including Fredric March Basil Rathbone Maureen O'Sullivan and Freddie Bartholomew. Greta Garbo is the soul of the film in a nuanced performance that won the New York Film Critics Best Actress Award. At the height of her art Garbo is unforgettable as a woman helpless in love's grasp and heartbroken at the loss of her son. Camille (1936): Life in 1847 Paris is as spirited as champagne and as unforgiving as the gray morning after. In gambling dens and lavish soirees men of means exert their wills and women turned courtesans exult in pleasure. One such woman is Marguerite Gautier (Garbo) the Camille of this sumptuous romantic tale based on the enduring Alexandre Dumas story. Garbo earned an Academy Award nomination and the New York Film Critics Best Actress Award for her memorable work in this George Cukor-directed film. Ninotchka (1939): Garbo shines in her first comedy a frothy tale of a dour Russian envoy sublimating her womanhood for Soviet brotherhood until she falls for a suave Parisian man-about-town (Melvyn Douglas). Working from a clever script written in part by Billy Wilder director Ernst Lubitsch knew better than anyone how to marry refinement with sublime wit. That's how we see Garbo's love struck Ninotchka: serenely dignified yet endearingly ridiculous.

  • Let's Make Love [1960] Let's Make Love | DVD | (22/05/2006) from £8.98  |  Saving you £4.01 (30.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Billionaire Jean-Marc Clement (Montand) learns that he is to be satirized in an off-Broadway revue. He goes to the theatre where he sees Amanda (Monroe) rehearsing a song and the director thinks him an actor suited to play himself in the revue. Clement takes the part to see more of Amanda but for how long can he keep his identity and his intentions a secret?

  • Must-See Musicals Collection [DVD] Must-See Musicals Collection | DVD | (29/10/2012) from £43.49  |  Saving you £6.50 (13.00%)  |  RRP £49.99

    <b>Titles comprise:</b> Calamity Jane Love me or Leave Me 42nd Street Annie get Your Gun Easter Parade High Society Meet me in St Louis Seven Brides for Seven Brothers Singin in the Rain On Moonlight Bay April in Paris A Star is Born Gypsy Band Wagon By the Light of the Silvery Moon

  • Born Yesterday [1950] Born Yesterday | DVD | (05/08/2002) from £3.00  |  Saving you £9.99 (76.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Born Yesterday was the box-office comedy hit of 1950 and won a Best Actress Oscar for the exceptional Judy Holliday, recreating her long-running Broadway triumph as Billie Dawn, the quintessential dumb blonde who finally gets herself some smarts. The film resonates with the sophisticated sparring in Garson Kanin's script and there are tightly controlled performances from William Holden as the cynical journalist hired to polish Billie up for Washington society and Broderick Crawford as Harry Brock, her rough, crooked and ambitious boyfriend. But Born Yesterday is Holliday's picture, as she runs the gamut from brassy insouciance to tentative, vulnerable enlightenment. She hasn't thought of her estranged father in five years: "It's nothing against him. I haven't thought of anything in five years." Her gradual awakening to the realisation that she is a stooge for Brock's corrupt business deals, and the way she sheds her chorus girl's intellect in the face of growing political awareness, are brilliantly traced. Holliday's dead-pan delivery makes the pathos of her self-discovery both hilarious and deeply touching; it's the hallmark of a comic genius, which makes the sparseness of her subsequent film appearances all the more regrettable. On the DVD: Born Yesterday is presented in full screen (1.33:1) ratio. Like the mono soundtrack, the black and white picture quality has triumphantly survived its more than half century. Extras include a gallery of vintage advertisements and an original theatrical trailer, plus filmographies and welcome, comprehensive booklet notes. --Piers Ford

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