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Director Seijun Suzuki

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  • Gate of Flesh [DVD] Gate of Flesh | DVD | (10/08/2009) from £6.05  |  Saving you £9.94 (62.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Gate of Flesh is one of the earliest examples of the sado-masochistic films called pinku eiga which galvanized Japanese Cinema during the 1970s. Directed by Seijun Suzuki considered one of the most important and influential voices in Japanese Cinema the film is set amidst the black markets and urban decay of Tokyo shortly after World War II had ended. Maya (Yumiko Nogawa) a young girl from a remote village with nowhere to go finds refuge with a gang of hookers living in a derelict building. The Women maintain order by adhering to a strict code the most important 'no sex without payment'. Those who break the code run the risk of enuring appalling punishment mostly at the hands of the gang's ringleader Komasa Sen (Satoko Kasai). The harmony of the group s broken when a violent ex-soldier on the run from the police Ibuki (Joe Shishido) seeks refuge in the building. All the women are drawn to Ibuki especially Maya resulting in trouble for both of them.

  • Nikkatsu Diamond Guys Vol 1 [Dual Format Blu-Ray + DVD] Nikkatsu Diamond Guys Vol 1 | Blu Ray | (25/01/2016) from £22.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (23.30%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Nikkatsu, the oldest film studio in Japan, inaugurated a star system in the late 1950s, finding talent and contracting to their Diamond Line for a series of wild genre pictures. This collection celebrates these Diamond Guys with three classic films from directors Seijun Suzuki (Branded to Kill), Toshio Masuda (Rusty Knife) and Buichi Saito (Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril). An old hand at tough guy action roles, Hideaki Nitani (Tokyo Drifter, Massacre Gun) stars in Suzuki's Voice Without a Shadow. Asako, a former telephone operator once heard the voice of a murder suspect which has continued to haunt her. Years later her husband invites his boss, Hamazaki, over for dinner and she realises his voice is suspiciously like that of the killer. Before she can investigate further, Hamazaki is found dead and her husband becomes the prime suspect Next, 50s subculture icon Yujiro Ishihara (Crazed Fruit) stars in Masuda's Red Pier as Jiro the Lefty, a killer with a natural talent. Shortly after arriving in Kobe, he witnesses a man die in a crane accident which turns out to be a cover-up for a murder. Jiro soon finds himself on the run, tailed by a determined cop Finally, in Saito's The Rambling Guitarist, mega star Akira Koabyashi (Battles Without Honour and Humanity) stars as wandering street musician Shinji, who falls in with mob boss Akitsu after saving one of his henchmen in a bar fight. Tasked by Akitsu with evicting an offshore fishery, Shinji finds himself in the middle of a very unusual domestic dispute Presented on Blu-ray and DVD for the first time in the West, these thrilling genre films feature Nikkatsu's leading talent at their best. Includes Special Edition Content: Limited Edition Blu-ray collection (3000 copies) High Definition digital transfers of all three films, from original film elements by Nikkatsu Corporation High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation Original uncompressed mono audio Newly translated English subtitles Specially recorded video discussions with Japanese cinema expert Jasper Sharp on Diamond Guys Hideaki Nitani and Yujiro Ishihara Original trailers for all three films and trailer preview for Diamond Guys Vol. 2 Extensive promotional image galleries for all three films Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Graham Humphreys Booklet featuring new essays on all three films and director profiles by Stuart Galbraith, Tom Mes and Mark Schilling

  • Youth Of The Beast [Masters of Cinema] Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) (1963) Youth Of The Beast Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) (1963) | Blu Ray | (27/10/2014) from £8.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Right on the heels of the riotous Go to Hell Bastards: Detective Bureau 2 3 Seijun Suzuki unleashed what would come to be seen as his true breakthrough the film that would cement the Suzuki sensibility: Youth of the Beast [Yajû no seishun]. A kaleidoscopic fantasia that contains youth and beast only insofar as 1963 pop/youth culture was that violently upstart thing — not unlike the yakuza? And so Youth of the Beast is a yakuza tale with a premise like Akira Kurosawa's Yôjinbô but denuded of an easy definition of which side is which. It stars Suzuki's iconic '60s regular Jô Shishido with his dare-you-to-call-them-out artificial cheek implants like new acting blasphemy. There are drug-addled whores gunfights in a new colour apocalypse and at least one alien landscape: the sudden mind-searing eruption of a sulphur yellow desert like an action -figure playset with overspill of unbridled lust... Suzuki's infectious go-for-broke energy is assisted by a telephoto lens that serves at once as phallus and yoni in the masterful Minnelli-worthy 'Scope framing. His film would go on to inspire John Woo's forthcoming remake titled Day of the Beast; Nikkatsu have in recent times deemed this movie one of their treasures. The Masters of Cinema Series is proud to present Youth of the Beast in a Dual Format (Blu-ray + DVD) edition based on their new HD master. Bonus Features: New high-definition 1080p presentation of the film on the Blu-ray and progressive encode on the DVD. New and improved optional English subtitles 36-PAGE BOOKLET featuring a new essay by Frederick Veith and rare archival imagery

  • Detective Bureau 2-3 Go To Hell Bastards! [Blu-ray] Detective Bureau 2-3 Go To Hell Bastards! | Blu Ray | (09/07/2018) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Starring original Diamond Guy, Jo Shishido, Seijun Suzuki's Detective Bureau 2-3: Go to Hell Bastards! is a hard hitting, rapid-fire yakuza film that redefined the Japanese crime drama. Detective Tajima (Shishido) is tasked with tracking down a consignment of stolen firearms, as the investigation progresses things take an anarchic, blood-drenched grudge match. Rapidly paced, darkly funny, and extremely stylish, Detective Bureau 2-3: Go to Hell Bastards! is unlike anything seen before and rightly deserves its cult status. Suzuki's send up of post-war greed would go on to cement his domestic and international status as one of the leading directors to come out of Japan. SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS: High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray presentation DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Newly translated optional English subtitles Interview with historian and Japanese cinema expert Tony Rayns Gallery of original production stills Theatrical trailer Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Matthew Griffin

  • Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years. Vol. 1 Seijun Rising: The Youth Movies Limited Edition [Blu-ray] Seijun Suzuki: The Early Years. Vol. 1 Seijun Rising: The Youth Movies Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (12/02/2018) from £38.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    YOUTHS ON THE LOOSE AND REBELS WITHOUT CAUSES IN THE UNRULY SEISHUN EIGA YOUTH MOVIES OF JAPANESE ICONOCLAST SEIJUN SUZUKI Making their home-video debuts outside Japan, this diverse selection of Nikkatsu youth movies (seishun eiga) charts the evolving style of the B-movie maverick best known for the cult classics Tokyo Drifter (1966) and Branded to Kill (1967). The Boy Who Came Back (1958) marks the first appearances of Nikkatsu Diamond Guys and regular Suzuki collaborators Akira Kobayashi and Jo Shishido, with Kobayashi cast as the hot-headed hoodlum fresh out of reform school who struggles to make a clean break with his tearaway past. The Wind-of-Youth Group Crosses the Mountain Pass (1961) is a carnivalesque tale of a young student who hooks up with a down-at-heels travelling circus troupe. Teenage Yakuza (1962) stars Tamio Kawaji as the high-school vigilante protecting his community from the extortions of mobsters from a neighbouring city. The Incorrigible (1963) and Born Under Crossed Stars (1965), both based on Toko Kon's novels about young love, represent Suzuki's first films set in the 1920s era later celebrated in his critically-regarded Taisho Trilogy. LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS Limited Edition Dual Format Collection [3000 copies] High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation Optional English Subtitles New introduction to the films by critic Tony Rayns 60-page illustrated collector's book featuring new writing by critic and author Jasper Sharp

  • The Flowers And the Angry Waves [1964] The Flowers And the Angry Waves | DVD | (26/03/2007) from £8.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (59.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In early 20-century industrial Japan Yakuza member Kikuju flees to Tokyo with his master's proposed bride leaving more than a few corpses in his wake. Settling down to work with some corrupt building contractors Kikuju is unaware that an assassin from his old gang is in town looking for him... Seijun Suzuki's blistering run of off-the-wall subverted genre movies continued with this scathing look at the stand-off between Japanese big business and no less corrupt trade unions while throwing in some stunning cinematography characteristic camera moves and of course a tattoed bandit geisha femme fatale!

  • Branded to Kill [Dual Format DVD & Blu-ray] Branded to Kill | Blu Ray | (18/08/2014) from £10.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (45.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Seijun Suzuki's absolutely mad yakuza movie Branded to Kill bends the hit-man genre so out-of-shape it more resembles a Luis Bunuel take on Martin Scorsese. Number Three killer Goro Hanada (Jo Shishido) is a hired gun who loves his work, but when he misses a target after a mere butterfly sets his carefully balanced aim astray, he becomes the next target of the mob. Goro is no pushover and easily dispatches the first comers, leaving them splayed in death contortions that could qualify for an Olympic event, but the rat-a-tat violence gives way to a surreal, sadistic game of cat and mouse. The legendary Number One mercilessly taunts his target before moving in with him in a macho, testosterone-laden Odd Couple truce that ends up with them handcuffed together. Kinky? Not compared to earlier scenes. The smell of boiling rice sets Goro's libido for his mistress so aflame that Suzuki censors the gymnastic sex with animated black bars that come to life in an animated cha-cha. Because Suzuki pushed his yakuza parodies and cinematic surrealism too far, his studio, Nikkatsu, finally called in their own metaphoric hit and fired the director with such force that he was effectively blackballed from the industry for a decade. It took about that long for audiences to embrace his audacious genre bending--Suzuki's pop-art sensibilities were just a bit ahead of their time. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

  • Seijun Suzuki's The Taisho Trilogy Limited Edition [Blu-ray] Seijun Suzuki's The Taisho Trilogy Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (24/07/2017) from £49.49  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    HAUNTING, HYPNOTIC, FLAMBOYANT, EROTIC, BIZARRE... SUZUKI! After over a decade in the wilderness following his firing from Nikkatsu for Branded to Kill (1967), maverick director Seijun Suzuki returned with a vengeance with his critically-praised tryptic of cryptic supernatural dramas set during the liberal enlightenment of Japan s Taisho Era (1912-26). In the multiple Japanese Academy Award-winning Zigeunerweisen (1980), two intellectuals and former colleagues from military academy involve their wives in a series of dangerous sexual games. In Kageroza (1981), a playwright is drawn like a moth to a flame to a mysterious beauty who might be a ghost, while Yumeji (1991) imagines the real-life painter-poet Takehisa Yumeji s encounter with a beautiful widow with a dark past. Presented together on Blu-ray for the first time outside of Japan, the films in the Taisho Trilogy are considered Suzuki s masterpieces in his homeland. Presenting a dramatic turn from more his familiar tales of cops, gangsters and unruly youth, these surrealistic psychological puzzles drip with a lush exoticism, distinctively capturing the pandemonium of a bygone age of decadence and excess, when Western ideas, fashions, technologies and art fused into everyday aspect of Japanese life.

  • Princess Raccoon [2005] Princess Raccoon | DVD | (25/09/2006) from £8.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (59.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Chinese superstar Zhang Ziyi (Memoirs Of A Geisha) stars in the latest film from master film maker Seijun Suzuki; a magical musical adaptation of a well known Japanese folktale. Ziyi stars as Tanuki-hime a raccoon spirit princess who falls in love with Amechiyo (Jo Odagiri) a human prince banished from his father's kingdom. With numbers ranging in style from Kabuki to operetta to rock 'n' roll and designs to set the imagination on fire Suzuki's dream project is one of the year's most vibrant entertainments. An extravaganza of sight sound music and romance that will amaze the senses and delight the heart.

  • Pistol Opera Pistol Opera | DVD | (23/10/2006) from £9.79  |  Saving you £10.20 (51.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Killing With Style!!! Stray Cat is number three. She wants to be number one. Pistol Opera is an extreme tale of a female assassin's surreal rise up the ranks of the criminal underworld. Legendary director Seijun Suzuki reworks his own Branded to Kill thirty-three years later into a totally new jaw-dropping experience!

  • Branded To Kill [1967] Branded To Kill | DVD | (25/02/2002) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Seijun Suzuki's absolutely mad yakuza movie Branded to Kill bends the hit-man genre so out-of-shape it more resembles a Luis Bunuel take on Martin Scorsese. Number Three killer Goro Hanada (Jo Shishido) is a hired gun who loves his work, but when he misses a target after a mere butterfly sets his carefully balanced aim astray, he becomes the next target of the mob. Goro is no pushover and easily dispatches the first comers, leaving them splayed in death contortions that could qualify for an Olympic event, but the rat-a-tat violence gives way to a surreal, sadistic game of cat and mouse. The legendary Number One mercilessly taunts his target before moving in with him in a macho, testosterone-laden Odd Couple truce that ends up with them handcuffed together. Kinky? Not compared to earlier scenes. The smell of boiling rice sets Goro's libido for his mistress so aflame that Suzuki censors the gymnastic sex with animated black bars that come to life in an animated cha-cha. Because Suzuki pushed his yakuza parodies and cinematic surrealism too far, his studio, Nikkatsu, finally called in their own metaphoric hit and fired the director with such force that he was effectively blackballed from the industry for a decade. It took about that long for audiences to embrace his audacious genre bending--Suzuki's pop-art sensibilities were just a bit ahead of their time. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

  • Fighting Elegy [1966] Fighting Elegy | DVD | (29/01/2007) from £8.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (59.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In Okayama in the mid 1930s Kiroku (Takahashi) attends high school and boards with a Catholic family whose daughter Michiko captures his heart. He must however hide his ardor and other aspects of his emerging sexuality focusing his energy on a gang he joins breaking school rules and getting into scuffles. He comes under the influence of a young tough nicknamed Terrapin and together they lead fights against rival gangs. Gradually Kiroku and Terrapin align themselves with the right-wing Kita Ikki and Kiroku becomes a stand-in for the attitudes of Japanese youth who embraced the imperialism leading to World War II... Screenplay adapted from Takashi Suzuki's novel by Kaneto Shindo (Onibaba Kuroneko).

  • Fighting Delinquents [1960] Fighting Delinquents | DVD | (26/03/2007) from £6.49  |  Saving you £13.50 (67.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    This rarely seen gem from the master Suzuki casts teenage heart-throb Koji Wada as young misfit who suddenly finds himself the unwitting pawn in an escalating family feud that ultimately leads to tragedy. This is the DVD premiere of Suzuki's first colour feature. Lean mean and stylish as always this tale of youth-gone-wild is both vibrant and touching. Suzuki contrasts tranquil glimpses of traditional regional life with the emergence of the new rock 'n' roll youth culture and the greed and seething cynicism of encroaching Westernisation. Also released under the title Go To Hell Hoodlums! this is a melodrama as colourful shocking and exhilarating as one would come to expect from Japan's master filmmaker.

  • Tokyo Drifter [1966] Tokyo Drifter | DVD | (25/02/2002) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In Tokyo Drifter director Seijun Suzuki transforms the yakuza genre into a pop-art James Bond cartoon as directed by Jean-Luc Godard. The near-incomprehensible plot is negligible: hitman "Phoenix" Tetsu (Tetsuya Watari), a cool killer in dark shades who whistles his own theme song, discovers his own mob has betrayed his code of ethics and hits the road like a questing warrior, with not one but two mobs hot on his trail. In a world of shifting loyalties Tetsu is the last honourable man, a character who might have stepped out of a Jean-Pierre Melville film and into the delirious, colour-soaked landscape of this Vincent Minnelli musical-turned-gangster war zone. The twisting narrative takes Tetsu from deliriously gaudy nightclubs, where killers hide behind every pillar, to the beautiful snowy plains of northern Japan and back again, leaving a trail of corpses in his wake. Suzuki opens the widescreen production in stark, high-contrast black and white with isolated eruptions of colour which finally explode in a screen glowing with oversaturated hues, like a comic book come to life. His extreme stylisation, jarring narrative leaps and wild plot devices combine to create pulp fiction on acid, equal parts gangster parody and post-modern deconstruction. Mere description cannot capture the visceral effect of Suzuki's surreal cinematic fireworks. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

  • Gate Of Flesh [1964] Gate Of Flesh | DVD | (14/06/2004) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Set in Tokyo just after the war 'Gate of Flesh' is the story of a group of prostitutes who live and work in a derelict building. Now recognised as a classic of Japanese cinema the film is a shocking sometimes brutal yet always compelling experience.

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