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Sofia Coppola

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  • Lost In Translation [2004] Lost In Translation | DVD | (28/06/2004) from £3.16  |  Saving you £16.83 (84.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Like a good dream, Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation envelopes you with an aura of fantastic light, moody sound, head-turning love, and a feeling of déjà vu, even though you've probably never been to this neon-fused version of Tokyo. Certainly Bob Harris has not. The 50-ish actor has signed-on for big money shooting whiskey ads instead of doing something good for his career or his long-distance family. Jetlagged, helplessly lost with his Japanese-speaking director and out of sync with the metropolis, Harris (Bill Murray, never better) befriends the married but lovelorn 25-year-old Charlotte (played with heaps of poise by 18-year-old Scarlett Johansson). Even before her photographer husband all but abandons her, she is adrift like Harris but in a total entrapment of youth. How Charlotte and Bill discover their soul mates will be cherished for years to come. Written and directed by Coppola (The Virgin Suicides), the film is far more atmospheric than plot-driven: we whiz through Tokyo parties, karaoke bars and odd nightlife, always ending up in the impossibly posh hotel where the two are staying. The wisps of bittersweet loneliness of Bill and Charlotte are handled smartly and romantically, but unlike modern studio films, this isn't a May to December fling film. Surely and steadily, the film ends on a much-talked-about grace note, which may burn some, yet awards film lovers who "always had Paris" with another cinematic destination of the heart. --Doug Thomas

  • Lost in Translation [Blu-ray] Lost in Translation | Blu Ray | (17/10/2011) from £5.08  |  Saving you £14.91 (74.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Sofia Coppola's second feature-length film focuses on two guests at a Tokyo hotel--Bob (Bill Murray), a middle-aged actor in town to film whiskey commercials, and Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson), the young wife of a trendy photographer (Giovanni Ribisi) who is always out on a shoot. When Bob isn't on the job taking fragmented direction from the Japanese crew, he's receiving faxes on home decorating from his emotionally distant wife. And while her husband is away, Charlotte spends most of her time trying to motivate herself to do more than look out the window at Tokyo's urban sprawl. So when the two meet in the hotel bar, they strike up an unusual friendship, one that provides a welcome escape from their boredom and loneliness. Nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and winner of Best Original Screenplay at the 2004 Oscars.

  • The Bling Ring [DVD] [2013] The Bling Ring | DVD | (28/10/2013) from £5.00  |  Saving you £12.99 (72.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Filmmaker Sofia Coppola has taken a few hits over the years for fixating on materially comfortable, yet emotionally vacuous protagonists. The Bling Ring, an adaption of a Vanity Fair exposé, doesn't flip the script, but there's a new-found buoyancy to her tale of lost kids in Los Angeles. When Marc (Israel Broussard, sweet and sympathetic), a middle-class student with "too many absences," enters a high school for wayward youth, everyone rebuffs him until he meets Rebecca (charismatic newcomer Katie Chang), who invites him to hang out, possibly because she pegs him as a willing accomplice. They proceed to bond over a fascination with fashion, tabloid stars, and entering unlocked cars to pilfer cash and cocaine. In short order, they're driving around Hollywood and singing along to songs by style-obsessed musicians, like M.I.A. When that thrill subsides, Becky suggests bigger game: the homes of careless celebrities, like Paris Hilton (who appears as herself). Their "shopping" excursions are so successful that they invite Chloe (Claire Julien), Sam (Taissa Farmiga), and Nicki (Emma Watson, miles away from Hermione Granger) to join them. In Coppola's conception, the teens have no goals other than to live like their materialistic idols, and by posting pictures to the Internet, they secured the fame they sought--but not without consequences. As a framing device, Coppola uses a journalist's interviews with the perpetrators, an unnecessary move, though it does allow Leslie Mann, who plays a clueless guardian, to do some of the most richly comedic work of her career. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

  • The Virgin Suicides [2000] The Virgin Suicides | DVD | (04/12/2000) from £4.49  |  Saving you £8.50 (65.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Sophia Coppola's alternately dreamy and unsettling film about five suburban sisters who all mysteriously kill themselves (the voice-over tells you as much in the first five minutes) casts a witchy spell that lingers like drugstore perfume on a hot day. Beautifully adapted from Jeffrey Eugenides' icily perfect novel (perhaps the best, if not only, work of fiction narrated exclusively in the first-person plural), the 1970s-set film is constructed as the collective memory of the neighbourhood boys who worshipped the beautiful Lisbon girls, blonde sylph-like teen siblings whose beauty and self-destruction still haunts and perplexes the narrators, now grown men. Why did they do it? Maybe because their Catholic mother (Kathleen Turner, magnificently clenched) locked them all up when near-youngest daughter Lux (the exquisite Kirsten Dunst) stayed out all night after the prom. Maybe it was due to a kind of pubertal feminine hysteria, set off by the first suicide of the youngest daughter Cecilia. Maybe they were infected by a more general malaise (the film fairly teams with images of dying elm trees, infested lakes and fetid nastiness). Or maybe they will just never know what it's like, in the words of Cecilia, to be a 13-year-old girl. Coppola has a canny eye for 1970s kitsch and the tawdry, touching magic totems of girlhood (tampons, bright bikinis, half-used make-up) and coaxes terrific deadpan performances both from the younger cast and the veterans. (James Woods as the nerdy Lisbon patriarch is as delightfully cast against type as Turner.) For all the languid gloom, there is great wit in the observation of 1970s decor and playful touches abound: airbrushed flashbacks like vintage Timotei commercials; inserts to reveal Lux has the name of her date magic markered on her knickers; teeth and eyes that sparkle unnaturally with post-production tricks. The soundtrack hits just the right wistful ironic note with a mix of period tunes by Todd Rungren, Gilbert O'Sullivan and the like, complemented by the electronica of French pop band Air (whose standalone efforts for the film are also available on a separate CD. A film as unforgettable as first love. --Leslie Felperin

  • Marie Antoinette Marie Antoinette | DVD | (26/02/2007) from £2.99  |  Saving you £16.50 (82.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A decadently imaginative interpretation of the life of France's iconic teenage queen Marie Antoinette from her betrothal and marriage to Louis XVI aged 15 to her reign as queen at 19 and to the termination of her royal tenure and ultimately the fall of Versailles in the French Revolution...

  • Somewhere [Blu-ray] [2010] Somewhere | Blu Ray | (04/04/2011) from £5.88  |  Saving you £17.90 (71.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    An intimate story set in contemporary Los Angeles Somewhere is a witty moving and empathetic look into the orbit of Hollywood actor Johnny Marco (played by Stephen Dorff). We join Marco as he stumbles through a life of excess living out of the legendary Chateau Marmont Hotel; he has a Ferrari to drive around in and a constant stream of girls and pills to stay in with. Comfortably numbed Johnny drifts along. Following an unexpected visit from his 11-year-old daughter Cleo (played wonderfully by Elle Fanning) their encounters encourage Johnny to face up to where he is with life and confront the question that at some point we all must; which path in life will you take? Filmed entirely on location Somewhere reunites Sofia Coppola with her Lost in Translation editor Sarah Flack and production designer Anne Ross. Sofia's brother Roman Coppola takes on the role of producer whilst her father Francis Ford Coppola is executive producer. The films atmospheric soundtrack is written by Grammy Award winning French band Phoenix.

  • Somewhere [DVD] [2010] Somewhere | DVD | (04/04/2011) from £5.14  |  Saving you £14.85 (74.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    An intimate story set in contemporary Los Angeles Somewhere is a witty moving and empathetic look into the orbit of Hollywood actor Johnny Marco (played by Stephen Dorff). We join Marco as he stumbles through a life of excess living out of the legendary Chateau Marmont Hotel; he has a Ferrari to drive around in and a constant stream of girls and pills to stay in with. Comfortably numbed Johnny drifts along. Following an unexpected visit from his 11-year-old daughter Cleo (played wonderfully by Elle Fanning) their encounters encourage Johnny to face up to where he is with life and confront the question that at some point we all must; which path in life will you take? Filmed entirely on location Somewhere reunites Sofia Coppola with her Lost in Translation editor Sarah Flack and production designer Anne Ross. Sofia's brother Roman Coppola takes on the role of producer whilst her father Francis Ford Coppola is executive producer. The films atmospheric soundtrack is written by Grammy Award winning French band Phoenix.

  • Lost In Translation / Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind [2003] Lost In Translation / Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind | DVD | (06/02/2006) from £6.79  |  Saving you £6.20 (47.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Lost In Translation (Dir. Sofia Coppola 2003): Sofia Coppola's second feature-length film focuses on two guests at a Tokyo hotel--Bob (Bill Murray) a middle-aged actor in town to film whiskey commercials and Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) the young wife of a trendy photographer (Giovanni Ribisi) who is always out on a shoot. When Bob isn't on the job taking fragmented direction from the Japanese crew he's receiving faxes on home decorating from his emotionally distant wife

  • The Bling Ring [Blu-ray] The Bling Ring | Blu Ray | (28/10/2013) from £8.26  |  Saving you £14.73 (64.10%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Filmmaker Sofia Coppola has taken a few hits over the years for fixating on materially comfortable, yet emotionally vacuous protagonists. The Bling Ring, an adaption of a Vanity Fair exposé, doesn't flip the script, but there's a new-found buoyancy to her tale of lost kids in Los Angeles. When Marc (Israel Broussard, sweet and sympathetic), a middle-class student with "too many absences," enters a high school for wayward youth, everyone rebuffs him until he meets Rebecca (charismatic newcomer Katie Chang), who invites him to hang out, possibly because she pegs him as a willing accomplice. They proceed to bond over a fascination with fashion, tabloid stars, and entering unlocked cars to pilfer cash and cocaine. In short order, they're driving around Hollywood and singing along to songs by style-obsessed musicians, like M.I.A. When that thrill subsides, Becky suggests bigger game: the homes of careless celebrities, like Paris Hilton (who appears as herself). Their "shopping" excursions are so successful that they invite Chloe (Claire Julien), Sam (Taissa Farmiga), and Nicki (Emma Watson, miles away from Hermione Granger) to join them. In Coppola's conception, the teens have no goals other than to live like their materialistic idols, and by posting pictures to the Internet, they secured the fame they sought--but not without consequences. As a framing device, Coppola uses a journalist's interviews with the perpetrators, an unnecessary move, though it does allow Leslie Mann, who plays a clueless guardian, to do some of the most richly comedic work of her career. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

  • Shakespeare In Love/Marie Antoinette/Vanity Fair [DVD] [1998] Shakespeare In Love/Marie Antoinette/Vanity Fair | DVD | (12/10/2009) from £5.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Shakespeare In Love (Dir. John Madden) (1998): When Will Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) needs passionate inspiration to break a bad case of writer's block a secret romance with the beautiful Lady Viola (Paltrow) starts the words flowing like never before! There are just two things he'll have to learn about his new love: not only is she promised to marry someone else she's successfully impersonating a man in order to play the lead in Will's latest production! Marie Antoinette (Dir. Sofia Coppola) (2006): A decadently imaginative interpretation of the life of France's iconic teenage queen Marie Antoinette from her betrothal and marriage to Louis XVI aged 15 to her reign as queen at 19 and to the termination of her royal tenure and ultimately the fall of Versailles in the French Revolution... Vanity Fair (Dir. Mira Nair 2004): Becky Sharp (Reese Witherspoon) is a poor but well educated girl born into a 19th-century society offering little in the way of career advancement for women. She becomes a governess for Sir Pitt Crawley (Bob Hoskins) and aims to find a rich husband.

  • Shakespeare In Love/Marie Antoinette/Vanity Fair Shakespeare In Love/Marie Antoinette/Vanity Fair | DVD | (19/11/2007) from £16.10  |  Saving you £3.89 (19.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Shakespeare In Love (Dir. John Madden) (1998): When Will Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) needs passionate inspiration to break a bad case of writer's block a secret romance with the beautiful Lady Viola (Paltrow) starts the words flowing like never before! There are just two things he'll have to learn about his new love: not only is she promised to marry someone else she's successfully impersonating a man in order to play the lead in Will's latest production! Marie Antoinette (Dir. Sofia Coppola) (2006): A decadently imaginative interpretation of the life of France's iconic teenage queen Marie Antoinette from her betrothal and marriage to Louis XVI aged 15 to her reign as queen at 19 and to the termination of her royal tenure and ultimately the fall of Versailles in the French Revolution... Vanity Fair (Dir. Mira Nair 2004): Becky Sharp (Reese Witherspoon) is a poor but well educated girl born into a 19th-century society offering little in the way of career advancement for women. She becomes a governess for Sir Pitt Crawley (Bob Hoskins) and aims to find a rich husband.

  • Girls Night In Girls Night In | DVD | (03/11/2008) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Set Comprises: Sense and Sensibility (1995): Sense and Sensibility is the story of two sisters: pragmatic Elinor (Emma Thompson) and passionately wilful Marianne (Kate Winslet). When their father Henry Dashwood dies by law his estate must pass to his eldest son from his first marriage. Suddenly homeless and impoverished his current wife and daughters find themselves living in a simple country cottage. The two sisters are soon accepted into their new society. Marianne becomes swept up in a passionate love affair with the dashing Willoughby (Greg Wise) while Elinor struggles to keep a tight rein on the family purse strings and to keep her feelings for Edward Ferrars (Hugh Grant) whom she left behind hidden from her family. Despite their different personalities they both experience great sorrow in their affairs but they learn to mix sense with sensibility in a society that is obsessed with both financial and social status. 50 First Dates (2004): Henry Roth (Sandler) the local marina veterinarian only dates tourists because he's afraid of commitment - that is until he meets Lucy (Barrymore). Unfortunately Lucy lost her short-term memory months ago in a car accident and for her each day is October the 13th. She follows the same routine every day - breakfast at the same restaurant pineapple-picking with her dad and eventually bed time where sleep wipes away her short-term memory. Henry however refuses to be forgotten and as his puppy love matures he embarks on a quest to restore her memory or at least be a part of her everyday routine. But vying for Lucy's attention isn't always easy. Henry explores various approaches before making a video for Lucy to watch every morning reminding her of who she is and what she's doing... Marie Antoinette (2006): A decadently imaginative interpretation of the life of France's iconic teenage queen Marie Antoinette from her betrothal and marriage to Louis XVI aged 15 to her reign as queen at 19 and to the termination of her royal tenure and ultimately the fall of Versailles in the French Revolution... Friends With Money (2006): Frances McDormand stars as Jane a successful dress designer who has taken to wild public outbursts stops washing her hair and is married to a kind man who might be gay (Simon McBurney). Joan Cusack is Franny a multimillionaire who appears to have the perfect life with her husband (Greg Germann) and kids. Catherine Keener plays Christine who is building her dream house and writing a screenplay with her husband (Jason Isaacs) as their life together is crumbling. And the youngest of the foursome Olivia (Jennifer Aniston) is a pot-smoking ne'er-do-well who works as a maid stalks her ex-lover and has a thing about not paying for certain high-end cosmetics. As they prepare to attend a major fundraiser for ALS they all take stock of their lives reaching some very difficult conclusions... Sleepless in Seattle (1993): Hanks stars as Sam Baldwin a widowed father who thanks to the wiles of his worried son becomes a reluctant guest on a radio call-in show. He's an instant hit with thousands of female listeners who deluge his Seattle home with letters of comfort. Meanwhile inspired in equal parts by Sam's story and by classic Hollywood romance writer Annie Reed (Ryan) becomes convinced that it's her destiny to meet Sam. There are just two problems: Annie's engaged to someone else and Sam doesn't know - yet- that they're made for each other.

  • Broken Flowers / Lost In Translation [2005] Broken Flowers / Lost In Translation | DVD | (20/03/2006) from £20.21  |  Saving you £4.78 (19.10%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Broken Flowers (Dir. Jim Jarmusch 2005): As the devoutly single Don Johnston (Murray) is dumped by his latest girlfriend (Delpy) he receives an anonymous pink letter informing him that he has a son who may be looking for him. Don is urged to investigate this mystery by his closest friend and neighbour Winston (Jeffrey Wright) an amateur sleuth and family man. Hesitant to travel at all Don nonetheless embarks on a cross-country trek in search of clues from four former flames (Frances Conroy Jessica Lange Sharon Stone and Tilda Swinton). Unannounced visits to each of these unique women hold new surprises for Don as he haphazardly confronts both his past and consequently his present... Lost In Translation (Dir. Sofia Coppola 2003): Sofia Coppola's second feature-length film focuses on two guests at a Tokyo hotel--Bob (Bill Murray) a middle-aged actor in town to film whiskey commercials and Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) the young wife of a trendy photographer (Giovanni Ribisi) who is always out on a shoot. When Bob isn't on the job taking fragmented direction from the Japanese crew he's receiving faxes on home decorating from his emotionally distant wife. And while her husband is away Charlotte spends most of her time trying to motivate herself to do more than look out the window at Tokyo's urban sprawl. So when the two meet in the hotel bar they strike up an unusual friendship one that provides a welcome escape from their boredom and loneliness. Nominated for Best Picture Best Director Best Actor and winner of Best Original Screenplay at the 2004 Oscars.

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