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  • The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen [2003] The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £4.40  |  Saving you £11.59 (72.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The heroes of 1899 are brought to life with the help of some expensive special effects in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. From the pages of Victorian literature come Captain Nemo, Dr Jekyll (and his alter ego Mr Hyde), Dorian Gray, Tom Sawyer, the Invisible Man, Mina Harker (from Dracula), and the hunter Allan Quatermain (Sean Connery), all assembled to combat an evil megalomaniac out to conquer the world. It's hardly an original plot, but perhaps that's fitting for a movie sewn together like Frankenstein's monster. It rushes from one frenetic battle to another, replacing sense with spectacle--Nemo's submarine rising from the water, a warehouse full of zeppelins bursting into flame, Venice collapsing into its own canals. It's flashy, dumb, and completely incoherent. Fans of the original comic book will be disappointed. --Bret Fetzer

  • 2012 [DVD] 2012 | DVD | (29/03/2010) from £2.49  |  Saving you £17.38 (86.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Now this is how you destroy the world. Roland Emmerich's 2012 pounces on a Nostradamus-style loophole in the Mayan calendar and rams the apocalypse through it, gleefully conjuring up an enormous amount of Saturday-matinee fun in the process. A scientist (Chiwetel Ejiofor) detects shifting continental plates and sun flares and realizes that this foretells the imminent destruction of the planet. Just as the molten lava is about to hit the fan, a novelist (John Cusack) takes his kids on a trip to Yellowstone; later he'll hook up with his ex (Amanda Peet) and her new boyfriend (Tom McCarthy) in a global journey toward safety. If there is any safety. The suitably hair-raising plot lines are punctuated--frequently, people, frequently--by visions of mayhem around the globe: the Vatican falls over, the White House is clobbered (Emmerich's Independence Day was not enough on that score), and the California coastline dives into the Pacific Ocean. Unlike other action directors we could name, Emmerich actually understands how to let you see and drink in these vast special-effects vistas--and they are incredible. He also honors the old Irwin Allen disaster-movie tradition by actually shelling out for good actors. Cusack and Ejiofor are convincing even in the cheesiest material; toss in Danny Glover (the U.S. president), Woody Harrelson (a nut-bar conspiracy-theorising radio host), Thandie Newton, and Oliver Platt, and you've got a very watchable batch of people. Emmerich hasn't developed an ear for dialogue, even at this stage in his career, and the final act goes on a bit too long. This is a very silly movie, but if you've got a weakness for B-movie energy and hairbreadth escapes, 2012 delivers quite a bit of both. --Robert Horton

  • The Bourne Legacy (DVD + Digital Copy + UV Copy) The Bourne Legacy (DVD + Digital Copy + UV Copy) | DVD | (03/12/2012) from £5.07  |  Saving you £14.92 (74.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Bourne Legacy introduces a brand new hero Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner) - an agent on the run from destruction and on a journey to discover the truth, in life-or-death stakes created by events of the first three Bourne Films. Cross and Dr. Shearing (Rachel Weisz) fight to survive as CIA Ops, led by Eric Byer (Edward Norton) attempt to shut down their Operation and make everyone involved disappear for good. The brains behind the previous films, Tony Gilroy, returns to take Bourne to the next level of this thrilling action series. An all-new cast is joined by veterans Albert Finney, Joan Allen, David Strathairn and Scott Glenn in The Bourne Legacy.

  • Unknown [DVD] Unknown | DVD | (18/07/2011) from £2.00  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A man awakens from a coma only to discover that someone has taken on his identity and that no one (not even his wife) believes him. With the help of a young woman he sets out to prove who he is.

  • Spider-Man [2002] Spider-Man | DVD | (25/11/2002) from £2.48  |  Saving you £20.06 (80.30%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Marvel Comics fans have been waiting for this big-screen Spider-Man since the character made his print debut in 1962, which attaches impossible expectations to a film that rates as a solid success without breaking out of the spandex ghetto in the way that Batman Returns or X-Men did. Tobey Maguire is ideally cast as speccy Peter Parker, a high school swot with personal problems. The suit and effects take over when he gets bitten by a genetically engineered (i.e., no longer radioactive) spider and transforms into a web-swinging superhero who finds that these super-powers don't really help him get close to the girl next door (Kirsten Dunst) or protect his elderly guardian (Cliff Robertson) from random violence. The villain of the peace is Peter's best friend's industrialist father (Willem Dafoe) who has dosed himself on an experimental serum which makes him go all Jekyll-and-Hyde and emerge as the cackling Green Goblin, who soon gets a grudge against Spider-Man. Sam Raimi gives it all a bright, airy, kinetic feel, with wonderful aerial stuff as Spider-Man escapes from his troubles by swinging between skyscrapers, and the rethink of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko's origin story is managed with a canny mix of faithfulness (JK Simmons' as the crass editor JJ Jameson is the image of the comic character) and send-up (after a big introduction, Spider-Man finally appears in a really rubbish first attempt at a spider costume). Maguire and the impossibly sweet Dunst make it work as a hesitant teen romance, but somehow the second half, which brings on the villain to give the hero someone to fight, is only exciting when it wants to be affecting too. --Kim Newman On the DVD: Spider-Man's two-disc offering is nothing out of the ordinary, but fans will find some gems here including Stan Lee's thoughts, a gallery of comic cover art and profiles on the baddies. The two commentaries (cast and crew, and Special Effects) both have long periods with pauses, but the special effects guys are full of insight. The DVD-ROM section offers some of the more exciting features, including three comics transferred onto your computer, page by page, although be aware that the "Film to Comic" comparison is not for the original but for the new comic of the film. As you would expect from a blockbuster superhero film, the sound and vision are immaculate. --Nikki Disney

  • Survivor [DVD] Survivor | DVD | (12/10/2015) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring Milla Jovovich (Resident Evil franchise) and Pierce Brosnan (Bond franchise) SURVIVOR is a gripping thriller about State Department employee Kate Abbott (Jovovich) newly posted in the American embassy in London. Kate is charged with stopping terrorists from getting into the U.S. which puts her directly in the line of fire: targeted for death framed for crimes she didn't commit discredited and on the run. Now she must find a way to clear her name and stop a large-scale terrorist attack set for New Year's Eve in New York's Times Square.

  • Oblivion [Blu-ray] Oblivion | Blu Ray | (19/08/2013) from £4.29  |  Saving you £20.70 (82.80%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Oblivion (Blu-Ray+UV)

  • Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance [DVD] Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance | DVD | (25/06/2012) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    As Johnny Blaze hides out in Eastern Europe, he is called upon to stop the devil, who is trying to take human form.

  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2 Disc) [2008] Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2 Disc) | DVD | (10/11/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £19.87 (79.50%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Nearly 20 years after riding his last Crusade, Harrison Ford makes a welcome return as archaeologist/relic hunter Indiana Jones in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, an action-packed fourth installment that's, in a nutshell, less memorable than the first three but great nostalgia for fans of the series. Producer George Lucas and screenwriter David Koepp (War of the Worlds) set the film during the cold war, as the Soviets--replacing Nazis as Indy's villains of choice and led by a sword-wielding Cate Blanchett with black bob and sunglasses--are in pursuit of a crystal skull, which has mystical powers related to a city of gold. After escaping from them in a spectacular opening action sequence, Indy is coerced to head to Peru at the behest of a young greaser (Shia LaBeouf) whose friend--and Indy's colleague--Professor Oxley (John Hurt) has been captured for his knowledge of the skull's whereabouts. Whatever secrets the skull holds are tertiary; its reveal is the weakest part of the movie, as the CGI effects that inevitably accompany it feel jarring next to the boulder-rolling world of Indy audiences knew and loved. There's plenty of comedy, delightful stunts--ants play a deadly role here--and the return of Raiders love interest Karen Allen as Marion Ravenwood, once shrill but now softened, giving her ex-love bemused glances and eye-rolls as he huffs his way to save the day. Which brings us to Ford: bullwhip still in hand, he's a little creakier, a lot grayer, but still twice the action hero of anyone in film today. With all the anticipation and hype leading up to the film's release, perhaps no reunion is sweeter than that of Ford with the role that fits him as snugly as that fedora hat. --Ellen A. Kim

  • Quantum of Solace [2008] Quantum of Solace | DVD | (23/03/2009) from £3.99  |  Saving you £21.00 (84.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Daniel Craig's second stint as James Bond continues the intriguing plot started in Casino Royale.

  • The Heist [DVD] The Heist | DVD | (08/04/2013) from £2.61  |  Saving you £12.38 (82.60%)  |  RRP £14.99

    It was a stroke of genius, but now the perfect crime is turning into a perfect disaster. Charles, Roger and George are the very picture of honest security guards. But when they learn their favorite artworks are being sent to another museum, they concoct a plan to switch the real masterpieces with fakes. All goes well until a mistake forces these first-time thieves into a last-minute escapade.

  • Rush Hour 2 [2001] Rush Hour 2 | DVD | (24/12/2001) from £4.99  |  Saving you £14.74 (73.70%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Rush Hour 2 retains the appeal of its popular predecessor, so fans will enjoy the antics of the returning stars, Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan. The action--and there's plenty of it--starts in Hong Kong, where Detective Lee (Chan) and his LA counterpart Detective Carter (Tucker) are attempting a vacation, only to get assigned to sleuth a counterfeiting scheme involving a Triad kingpin (John Lone), his lethal henchwoman (Zhang Ziyi, from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and an American billionaire (Alan King). Director Brett Ratner simply lets his stars strut their stuff, so it hardly matters that the plot is disposable, or that his direction is so bland he may well have directed the film from a phone in a Jacuzzi. At its best, Rush Hour 2 compares favourably to Chan's glossiest Hong Kong hits, and when the action moves to Las Vegas (where Don Cheadle makes an unbilled cameo), the film goes into high-pitched hyper-drive, riding an easy wave of ambitious stunt-work and broad, derivative humour. However, echoes of Beverly Hills Cop are easy to see and stale ideas (including a comedic highlight for Jeremy Piven as a gay clothier) are made even more aggravating by dialogue that's almost Neanderthal in its embrace of retro-racial stereotypes. Of course, that's what makes Rush Hour 2 a palatable dish of mainstream comedy: it insults and comforts the viewer at the same time, and while some may find Tucker's relentless hamming unbearable, those who enjoyed Rush Hour are sure to appreciate another dose of Chan-Tucker lunacy. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • The Tourist [DVD] [2010] The Tourist | DVD | (25/04/2011) from £3.09  |  Saving you £16.90 (84.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Perfect Trip... The Perfect Trap... Johnny Depp stars as an American tourist whose playful dalliance with a stranger leads to a web of intrigue romance and danger in The Tourist. During an impromptu trip to Europe to mend a broken heart Frank (Depp) unexpectedly finds himself in a flirtatious encounter with Elise (Angelina Jolie) an extraordinary woman who deliberately crosses his path. Against the breathtaking backdrop of Paris and Venice their whirlwind romance quickly evolves as they find themselves unwittingly thrust into a deadly game of cat and mouse.

  • Rush Hour [1998] Rush Hour | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £3.95  |  Saving you £6.12 (51.00%)  |  RRP £11.99

    The plot line may sound familiar: two mismatched cops are assigned as reluctant partners to solve a crime. Culturally they are complete opposites, and they quickly realise they can't stand each other. One (Jackie Chan) believes in doing things by the book. He is a man with integrity and nerves of steel. The other (Chris Tucker) is an amiable rebel who can't stand authority figures. He's a man who has to do everything on his own, much to the displeasure of his superior officer, who in turn thinks this cop is a loose cannon but tolerates him because he gets the job done. Directed by Brett Ratner, Rush Hour doesn't break any new ground in terms of story, stunts, or direction. It rehashes just about every "buddy" movie ever made--in fact, it makes films such as Tango and Cash seem utterly original and clever by comparison. So, why did this uninspired movie make over $120 million at the box office? Was the whole world suffering from temporary insanity? Hardly. The explanation for the success of Rush Hour is quite simple: chemistry. The casting of veteran action maestro Jackie Chan with the charming and often hilarious Chris Tucker was a serendipitous stroke of genius. Fans of Jackie Chan may be slightly disappointed by the lack of action set-pieces that emphasise his kung-fu craft. On the other hand, those who know the history of this seasoned Hong Kong actor will be able to appreciate that Rush Hour was the mainstream breakthrough that Chan had deserved for years. Coupled with the charismatic scene-stealer Tucker, Chan gets to flex his comic muscles to great effect. From their first scenes together to the trademark Chan outtakes during the end credits, their ability to play off of one another is a joy to behold, and this mischievous interaction is what saves the film from slipping into the depths of pitiful mediocrity. --Jeremy Storey

  • Snow White and the Huntsman [DVD] Snow White and the Huntsman | DVD | (01/10/2012) from £4.19  |  Saving you £15.80 (79.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Definitely not your average retelling of the classic Snow White fairy tale, Snow White and the Huntsman is a dark, action-fantasy film that's based more on the Brothers Grimm fairy tale than the well-known Disney version of the story. It features intriguing concepts, impressive special effects, and some disappointingly lackluster acting. The essence of the "Snow White" story is preserved in this recounting: the queen's beautiful daughter Snow White, who is heir to the throne, is displaced and persecuted by an evil stepmother after her mother dies. Here, the evil stepmother Ravenna possesses a disturbing power to maintain her own perpetual youth by stealing youthfulness from the hearts of the young and beautiful, but her magic mirror warns that Snow White's innocence and purity as she comes of age will destroy Ravenna's chance at immortality. When Snow White escapes from the castle prison, Ravenna hires a downtrodden Huntsman to bring her back so that Ravenna can steal her youth and achieve personal immortality. But Snow White runs into a dark and sinister forest where mushrooms disperse hallucinogenic spores, trees come to life, flocks of bats spring from inanimate objects, and dwarves lurk in the shadows. The roles of the seven dwarves and the Huntsman in this version of the story prove to be quite different from the original, but what remain steadfast are Snow White's inner strength and absolute goodness, and her stepmother's innate evilness. This film is full of fascinating imagery that's brought to life through powerful special effects, great costuming, and captivating cinematography--the scenes in the dark forest and the fairy-filled wilderness beyond are reason enough to see it. Unfortunately, the story moves a bit slowly and the acting by Kristen Stewart (Snow White) and Chris Hemsworth (Huntsman) is rather stoical and passionless and lacks chemistry, though Charlize Theron does stand out as a particularly disturbing Ravenna. --Tami Horiuchi

  • The Last Legion The Last Legion | DVD | (18/02/2008) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    This epic thrilling and action-packed film is in the great tradition of epic adventures such as 300 Gladiator and King Arthur. It tells the story of how the legend of the Sword in the Stone began with stirring heart-stopping battle scenes great enduring friendship and the love of father and son. AD 476. The Roman Empire is crumbling and the last Emperor is fleeing for his life. His only safety is to be found in his mystic father figure and in the hands of his bodyguard and an enigmatic Byzantine warrior. His only sanctuary lies in the far-flung Western outpost of Britannia with the Last Legion - and a myth. The Empire is being held to ransom by the Barbarians. On the eve of the coronation of the 12-year-old Romulus Augustus his mentor the shaman Ambrosinus (Ben Kingsley) predicts disaster. His worst fears are realised as the Goths sack the once-great city of Rome and capture the last Emperor and his protector. They are imprisoned on the historic island of Capri where Romulus is destined to discover the mythical sword of Csar that holds the prophecy - 'One edge to defend one to defeat; In Britannia was I forged... to fit the hand of he... who is destined to rule.' One legionnaire survives to escort his Emperor to safety - the boy's loyal bodyguard Aurelius (Colin Firth). Aided by a mysterious black-clad Byzantine warrior (Aishwarya Rai) and Ambrosinus' strategic cunning Aurelius frees Romulus only to face betrayal and a fight for their lives. With the world against them their only course of action is to reach the one legion loyal to Rome. They face a perilous trek across a continent to Britain in search of The Last Legion. There a new myth - destined to span the centuries - is waiting to rise.

  • Red 2 [DVD] Red 2 | DVD | (25/11/2013) from £3.89  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Retired CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) reunites his team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a nuclear device. However to succeed they need to survive an army of relentless assassins ruthless terrorists and power crazed government officials all eager to get their hands on the next-generation weapons. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris London and Moscow. Outgunned and outmanned they have only their cunning wits their old-school skills and each other to rely on as they try to save the world.

  • K-19: The Widowmaker [2002] K-19: The Widowmaker | DVD | (19/05/2003) from £4.85  |  Saving you £11.14 (69.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    An intense dramatisation of a long-suppressed Cold War anecdote, K-19: The Widowmaker is the first big Hollywood film to view the conflict through a Soviet periscope, casting Harrison Ford and Liam Neeson (with slight accents) as patriotic Russians. In 1961, as NATO deploys long-range nuclear attack submarines, the Kremlin forces the Russian Navy to follow suit, whether they're ready or not. Ford takes over from popular skipper Neeson in command of the eponymous submarine, riding the men hard through a missile test, and then coping with an escalating series of crises as a jerry-built reactor threatens to melt down (and perhaps start World War III). Though the political specifics are fresh, this has all the expected elements of a sub movie, citing everything from Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Das Boot to Crimson Tide and The Caine Mutiny as sailors bristle mutinously under a marine martinet. This, along with inept engineering and ideological interference, prompts disaster. Director Kathryn Bigelow, the most undervalued talent in Hollywood, is in her element with heroic men under pressure, and a terrific central stretch has comrades trying to fix the reactor even though they've been given the wrong protective gear and start coming down with radiation sickness as they work. Less successful is a superfluous epilogue that pulls the old Spielberg present-day-reunion-of-the-aged-survivors-at-a-gravesite gambit. --Kim Newman

  • Pirates Of The Caribbean - Dead Man's Chest [2006] Pirates Of The Caribbean - Dead Man's Chest | DVD | (25/06/2007) from £3.13  |  Saving you £12.56 (69.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Captain Jack Is Back! Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) is mortified to discover he owes a blood debt to the legendary Davey Jones captain of the ghostly Flying Dutchman. With time running out Jack must find a way out of his debt or else be doomed to eternal damnation. And as if this weren't enough his problems prompt the cancellation of the wedding plans of a certain Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) who are forced to join Jack on another maritime misadventure!

  • Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Single Disc Edition) [2003] Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Single Disc Edition) | DVD | (05/04/2004) from £3.89  |  Saving you £12.10 (75.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Aside from some gripping battles and a storm sequence to rival anything seen on screen, Peter Weir's Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is as much about daily shipboard life during the Napoleonic era--especially the relationship between Captain Aubrey (Russell Crowe) and Doctor Stephen Maturin (Paul Bettany)--as it is about spectacle. Aubrey is a powerful figure whose experience and strength of character commands unwavering trust and respect from his crew; Crowe seems in his element naturally enough. Bettany, though, is his match on screen as Aubrey's intellectual foil. Director Weir successfully translates their relationship from novel to screen by subtly weaving in their past history and leaving viewers--whether they've read Patrick O'Brian's books or not--to do the thinking. Although the film's special effects ate up a huge budget they never overtake the drama, with careful characterisation and painstaking attention to historical accuracy taking centre stage. Matching action to detail, drama to humour and special effects to well-sketched characters, Master and Commander is a deeply satisfying big-screen experience, breathing a bracing gust of sea air into Hollywood megabuck filmmaking.--Laura Bushell On the DVD: Master & Commander's single-disc edition displays the full glories of the big screen experience, with Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS sound options that make the most of the resounding battle scenes as well as the small but vital details of creaking planks and lapping waves, while the sweeping CinemaScope (2.35:1) photography anamorphically formatted for 16:9 widescreen splendidly reproduces Peter Weir's painterly compositions. It's a tad disappointing, then, to note the lack of a director's commentary (surely such an insightful director as Weir would have plenty to say) and the excessive promotional material--cinema trailers and plugs for Fox DVDs-- that plays even before the main menu screen appears: anyone who has bought this title for repeat viewing deserves not to be subjected to such a broadside of soon-to-be-out-of-date advertising. --Mark Walker

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