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  • The Bourne Legacy (DVD + Digital Copy + UV Copy) The Bourne Legacy (DVD + Digital Copy + UV Copy) | DVD | (03/12/2012) from £1.25  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Bourne Legacy introduces a brand new hero Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner) - an agent on the run from destruction and on a journey to discover the truth, in life-or-death stakes created by events of the first three Bourne Films. Cross and Dr. Shearing (Rachel Weisz) fight to survive as CIA Ops, led by Eric Byer (Edward Norton) attempt to shut down their Operation and make everyone involved disappear for good. The brains behind the previous films, Tony Gilroy, returns to take Bourne to the next level of this thrilling action series. An all-new cast is joined by veterans Albert Finney, Joan Allen, David Strathairn and Scott Glenn in The Bourne Legacy.

  • Transformers (2007) Transformers (2007) | DVD | (03/12/2007) from £2.34  |  Saving you £17.65 (88.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    As sci-fi action blockbusters go, they don't come much bigger than Transformers. Maybe it's because of the subject matter: it's based on a toy line from the 1980s, concerning giant robots from outer space engaged in a civil war that pits the heroic Autobots against the evil Decepticons. They have the ability to disguise themselves as vehicles and other mechanical objects, transforming back into robots when it's time to stomp each other senseless. As a premise, it's rather silly. But it's also very simple, and that's why it works. The heroes are truly heroic: the noble and powerful Autobot leader Optimus Prime is one of the most iconic characters of the 1980s, and getting the original voice actor (Peter Cullen) to give him life was a stroke of genius. The villains, meanwhile, are just plain evil: Decepticon leader Megatron (voiced by Hugo Weaving) is motivated by absolute power, and his soldiers are not above a bit of wanton destruction to achieve their goals. Mix in a bit of mysticism in the form of the Allspark, the source of life for all Transformers, and the result is pure cinematic magic. It's not a perfect film: there are some characters and sub-plots that are unnecessary and which go nowhere, and at almost three hours, it's a lot of movie. But the Transformers themselves, rendered in CGI, have a very realistic size and weight on screen, and look particularly good as they switch from one mode to the other. Moreover, director Michael Bay is smart enough to realise that appealing to kids doesn't mean pandering to them--the cutest robot on screen is a manic little psychotic killer with the apt name Frenzy. The humans in the film, meanwhile, keep the film grounded, whilst never detracting from the real robot stars. Unlike The Matrix trilogy, which tried to be too clever, or The Lord of the Rings films, which were too clever, Transformers is probably the best science fiction epic since the original Star Wars trilogy. --Robert Burrow

  • Source Code [DVD] Source Code | DVD | (15/08/2011) from £2.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Filled with thrilling twists and heart-pounding suspense Source Code is directed by Duncan Jones (Moon) and stars Jake Gyllenhaal (Donnie Darko Prince of Persia). Captain Colter Stevens (Gyllenhaal) awakens on a speeding commuter train with no idea how he got there. Seeking refuge in the bathroom he's shocked to see another man's reflection in the mirror. Suddenly a massive explosion rips through the train. Almost instantly Colter is transported to a high-tech isolation unit where he discovers he is on a high-priority mission to identify a bomber who destroyed a train just hours earlier and who plans to kill thousands more with a much larger explosion in the heart of Chicago. A top-secret program named 'source code' allows Colter to exist briefly as another man in the parallel reality of the doomed commuter train. Each time he returns to the train Colter has just eight minutes to uncover the bomber's identity. The more he learns the more convinced he becomes that he can prevent the deadly blast from ever happening - unless time runs out first.

  • The Brothers Grimm [2005] The Brothers Grimm | DVD | (13/03/2006) from £3.94  |  Saving you £12.75 (70.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Eliminating Evil Since 1812. Set in the early 19th century (in French-occupied Germany!) Will Grimm (Damon) and Jake Grimm (Ledger) are siblings who travel the countryside as snake-oil salesmen convincing unsuspecting towns that they are haunted and agreeing to get rid of the demons; all for a price of course. In the meantime they set their tales down in writing creating a wealth of oddball offbeat and frightening characters. But after they are caught by General Delatombe

  • The Covenant The Covenant | DVD | (09/04/2007) from £1.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (62.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Four young men who belong to a supernatural legacy are charged with stopping the evil force they released into the world years earlier. Another great force they must contend with is the jealousy and suspicion that threatens to tear them apart

  • Survivor [DVD] Survivor | DVD | (12/10/2015) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring Milla Jovovich (Resident Evil franchise) and Pierce Brosnan (Bond franchise) SURVIVOR is a gripping thriller about State Department employee Kate Abbott (Jovovich) newly posted in the American embassy in London. Kate is charged with stopping terrorists from getting into the U.S. which puts her directly in the line of fire: targeted for death framed for crimes she didn't commit discredited and on the run. Now she must find a way to clear her name and stop a large-scale terrorist attack set for New Year's Eve in New York's Times Square.

  • The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift (1 Disc)  [2006] The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift (1 Disc) | DVD | (30/10/2006) from £4.00  |  Saving you £14.74 (73.70%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Speed needs no translation. From the makers of The Fast and the Furious and 2 Fast 2 Furious comes the highest-octane instalment of the hit movie franchise built for speed! Shaun Boswell has always been an outsider. A loner at school his only connection to the indifferent world around him is through illegal street racing - which has made him particularly unpopular with the local authorities. To avoid jail time Shaun is sent out of the country to live with his uncle in the military in a cramped apartment in a low-rent section of Tokyo. In the land that gave birth to the majority of modified racers on the road the simple street race has been replaced by the ultimate pedal-to-the-metal gravity-defying automotive challenge ... drift racing a deadly combination of brutal speed on heart stopping courses of hairpin turns and switchbacks. For his first unsuccessful foray in drift racing Shaun unknowingly takes on D.K. the ""Drift King "" with ties to the Yakuza the Japanese crime machine. The only way he can pay off the debt of his loss is to venture into the deadly realm of the Tokyo underworld where the stakes are life and death.

  • Deja Vu [2006] Deja Vu | DVD | (14/05/2007) from £3.39  |  Saving you £14.60 (81.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    This dramatic American action thriller is the latest film from producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Tony Scott and stars actors Denzel Washington Val Kilmer Paula Patton Bruce Greenwood Adam Goldberg and Jim Caviezel. The adventure takes place in New Orleans USA where federal agent Doug Carlin (Denzel Washington) is guided through an FBI crime investigation by feelings of deja vu.

  • Rise of the Planet of the Apes - Triple Play (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital Copy) Rise of the Planet of the Apes - Triple Play (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital Copy) | Blu Ray | (12/12/2011) from £3.99  |  Saving you £21.00 (84.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    A galaxy's worth of nihilism buried under a 70s Velveeta topping, The Planet of the Apes series stands today as a dark marvel of pop cinema, a group of wildly variable films that combine to form a giant inescapable kiss-off to the human race. (That said message was able to withstand such distractions as ever-cheapening makeup and Charlton Heston loudly pounding sand makes its achievements even more impressive, really.) Boasting a keen awareness of its predecessors' particular charms and a gem of a central CGI performance by Andy Serkis, Rise of the Planet of the Apes makes for a rather miraculous summer movie: a big-budget special effects extravaganza that also delivers a killer backhand. Sort of redoing 1972's Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, the film follows the events set in motion when a bereaved scientist (James Franco) attempts to create a cure for Alzheimer's, resulting in a supernaturally intelligent chimp named Caesar. The old bit about science tampering in God's domain quickly applies. Director Rupert Wyatt (The Escapist) displays an admirable sense of pacing, deftly levying the escalating action scenes with small character moments from the likes of John Lithgow and Brian Cox. That said, the film belongs to Caesar, whose path from wide-eyed innocent to reluctant revolutionary generates the ironic pulp empathy that gave the original series such a kick. Watching the climactic confrontation on the Golden Gate Bridge, it's distressingly easy to figure out which side to root for. Chuck Heston would no doubt grit his teeth in approval. Note: Those skeptical that this revamp could wholly retain the original's doomy backbeat would do well to stick around during the end credits. --Andrew Wright

  • The Rise of the Planet of the Apes [Blu-ray] The Rise of the Planet of the Apes | Blu Ray | (27/02/2012) from £3.99  |  Saving you £21.00 (84.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    A galaxy's worth of nihilism buried under a 70s Velveeta topping, The Planet of the Apes series stands today as a dark marvel of pop cinema, a group of wildly variable films that combine to form a giant inescapable kiss-off to the human race. (That said message was able to withstand such distractions as ever-cheapening makeup and Charlton Heston loudly pounding sand makes its achievements even more impressive, really.) Boasting a keen awareness of its predecessors' particular charms and a gem of a central CGI performance by Andy Serkis, Rise of the Planet of the Apes makes for a rather miraculous summer movie: a big-budget special effects extravaganza that also delivers a killer backhand. Sort of redoing 1972's Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, the film follows the events set in motion when a bereaved scientist (James Franco) attempts to create a cure for Alzheimer's, resulting in a supernaturally intelligent chimp named Caesar. The old bit about science tampering in God's domain quickly applies. Director Rupert Wyatt (The Escapist) displays an admirable sense of pacing, deftly levying the escalating action scenes with small character moments from the likes of John Lithgow and Brian Cox. That said, the film belongs to Caesar, whose path from wide-eyed innocent to reluctant revolutionary generates the ironic pulp empathy that gave the original series such a kick. Watching the climactic confrontation on the Golden Gate Bridge, it's distressingly easy to figure out which side to root for. Chuck Heston would no doubt grit his teeth in approval. Note: Those skeptical that this revamp could wholly retain the original's doomy backbeat would do well to stick around during the end credits. --Andrew Wright

  • X-Men Origins: Wolverine [DVD] X-Men Origins: Wolverine | DVD | (19/10/2009) from £2.19  |  Saving you £17.70 (88.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Wolverine, fan favourite of the X-Men universe in both comic books and film, gets his own movie vehicle with X-Men Origins: Wolverine, a tale that reaches way, way back into the hairy mutant's story. Somewhere in the wilds of northwest Canada in the early 1800s, two boys grow up amid violence: half-brothers with very special powers. Eventually they will become the near-indestructible warriors (and victims of a super-secret government program) known as Wolverine and Sabretooth, played respectively by Hugh Jackman (returning to his role) and Liev Schreiber (new to the scene). It helps enormously to have Schreiber, an actor of brawny skills, as the showiest villain; the guy can put genuine menace into a vocal inflection or a shift of the eyes. Danny Huston is the sinister government operative whose experiments keep pulling Wolverine back in, Lynn Collins is the woman who shares a peaceful Canadian co-existence with our hero when he tries to drop out of the program, and Ryan Reynolds adds needed humour, at least for a while. The fast-paced early reels give an entertaining kick-off to the Wolverine saga, only to slow down when a proper plot must be put together--but isn't that perpetually the problem with origin stories? And despite a cool setting, the grand finale is a little hemmed in by certain plot essentials that must be in place for the sequels, which may be why characters do nonsensical things. So, this one is fun while it lasts, if you're not looking for a masterpiece, or an explanation for Wolverine's facial grooming. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com Stills from X-Men Origins: Wolverine (Click for larger image)    

  • Rush Hour 2 [2001] Rush Hour 2 | DVD | (24/12/2001) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Rush Hour 2 retains the appeal of its popular predecessor, so fans will enjoy the antics of the returning stars, Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan. The action--and there's plenty of it--starts in Hong Kong, where Detective Lee (Chan) and his LA counterpart Detective Carter (Tucker) are attempting a vacation, only to get assigned to sleuth a counterfeiting scheme involving a Triad kingpin (John Lone), his lethal henchwoman (Zhang Ziyi, from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and an American billionaire (Alan King). Director Brett Ratner simply lets his stars strut their stuff, so it hardly matters that the plot is disposable, or that his direction is so bland he may well have directed the film from a phone in a Jacuzzi. At its best, Rush Hour 2 compares favourably to Chan's glossiest Hong Kong hits, and when the action moves to Las Vegas (where Don Cheadle makes an unbilled cameo), the film goes into high-pitched hyper-drive, riding an easy wave of ambitious stunt-work and broad, derivative humour. However, echoes of Beverly Hills Cop are easy to see and stale ideas (including a comedic highlight for Jeremy Piven as a gay clothier) are made even more aggravating by dialogue that's almost Neanderthal in its embrace of retro-racial stereotypes. Of course, that's what makes Rush Hour 2 a palatable dish of mainstream comedy: it insults and comforts the viewer at the same time, and while some may find Tucker's relentless hamming unbearable, those who enjoyed Rush Hour are sure to appreciate another dose of Chan-Tucker lunacy. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Pirates of the Caribbean 3: At World's End Pirates of the Caribbean 3: At World's End | DVD | (19/11/2007) from £4.09  |  Saving you £18.00 (78.30%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is a rollicking voyage in the same spirit of the two earlier Pirates films, yet far darker in spots (and nearly three hours to boot). The action, largely revolving around a pirate alliance against the ruthless East India Trading Company, doesn't disappoint, though the violence is probably too harsh for young children. Through it all, the plucky cast (Keira Knightley, Orlando Bloom, Geoffrey Rush) are buffeted by battle, maelstroms, betrayal, treachery, a ferocious Caribbean weather goddess, and that gnarly voyage back from the world's end--but with their wit intact. As always, Johnny Depp's Jack Sparrow tosses off great lines; he chastises "a woman scorned, like which hell hath no fury than!" He insults an opponent with a string of epithets, ending in "yeasty codpiece." In the previous The Curse of the Black Pearl, Sparrow was killed--sent to Davy Jones' Locker. In the opening scenes, the viewer sees that death has not been kind to Sparrow--but that's not to say he hasn't found endless ways to amuse himself, cavorting with dozens of hallucinated versions of himself on the deck of the Black Pearl. But Sparrow is needed in this world, so a daring rescue brings him back. Keith Richards' much ballyhooed appearance as Jack's dad is little more than a cameo, though he does play a wistful guitar. But the action, as always, is more than satisfying, held together by Depp, who, outsmarting the far-better-armed British yet again, causes a bewigged commander to muse: "Do you think he plans it all out, or just makes it up as he goes along?" As far as fans are concerned, it matters not. --A.T. Hurley

  • Ocean's Eleven [2002] Ocean's Eleven | DVD | (14/10/2002) from £2.65  |  Saving you £9.60 (68.60%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Ocean's Eleven improves on 1960's Rat Pack original with supernova casting, a slickly updated plot and Steven Soderbergh's graceful touch behind the camera. Soderbergh reportedly relished the opportunity "to make a movie that has no desire except to give pleasure from beginning to end", and he succeeds on those terms, blessed by the casting of George Clooney as Danny Ocean, the title role originated by Frank Sinatra. Fresh out of jail, Ocean masterminds a plot to steal $163 million from the seemingly impervious vault of Las Vegas's Bellagio casino, not just for the money but to win his ex-wife (Julia Roberts) back from the casino's ruthless owner (Andy Garcia). Soderbergh doesn't scrimp on the caper's comically intricate strategy, but he finds greater joy in assembling a stellar team (including Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle and Carl Reiner) and indulging their strengths as actors and thieves. The result is a film that's as smooth as a silk suit and just as stylish. --Jeff Shannon On the DVD: Ocean's Eleven on disc is hardly swarming with special features, but just like all good heists it's quality not quantity that counts. Although the DVD-ROM feature is simply a game of computer blackjack, the cast list simply that and the HBO special just a standard Hollywood promo, the two refreshing and honest commentaries more than compensate. The cast commentary is lively and it's nice to hear intelligent comments coming from Hollywood's big league for a change. However, it's the director and writer's commentary that is the real gem; it's funny, enlightening and most of all it allows Ted Griffin to put the case forward for all screenwriters across the world as to the importance of their craft. The main feature has an impressive transfer of sound and visuals, making the suits sharper and David Holmes' soundtrack even funkier. --Nikki Disney

  • The Double [DVD] The Double | DVD | (28/01/2013) from £4.73  |  Saving you £11.20 (70.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    When a US senator turns up dead with his throat slit, retired CIA operative Paul Shepherdson (Richard Gere) is sure it bears the mark of infamous Soviet assassin Cassius. The only problem is that Cassius was thought to have been killed years ago. Forced back into service, Paul is teamed with a hotshot FBI agent Ben Geary (Topher Grace) who believes that Cassius has been active all this time. As the pair get closer to the shocking truth, Shepherdson is forced to re-examine everything he thought he knew, in this edge of your seat espionage thriller.

  • The Amazing Spider-Man [Blu-ray][Region Free] The Amazing Spider-Man | Blu Ray | (26/11/2012) from £3.09  |  Saving you £21.90 (87.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    A teenage Peter Parker grapples with both high school and amazing super-human crises as his alter-ego Spider-Man.Directed by Marc Webb.

  • King Kong [2005] King Kong | DVD | (10/04/2006) from £4.00  |  Saving you £19.99 (80.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Movies don't come any bigger than Peter Jackson's King Kong, a three-hour remake of the 1933 classic that marries breathtaking visual prowess with a surprising emotional depth.

  • Rush Hour [1998] Rush Hour | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £3.50  |  Saving you £4.34 (36.20%)  |  RRP £11.99

    The plot line may sound familiar: two mismatched cops are assigned as reluctant partners to solve a crime. Culturally they are complete opposites, and they quickly realise they can't stand each other. One (Jackie Chan) believes in doing things by the book. He is a man with integrity and nerves of steel. The other (Chris Tucker) is an amiable rebel who can't stand authority figures. He's a man who has to do everything on his own, much to the displeasure of his superior officer, who in turn thinks this cop is a loose cannon but tolerates him because he gets the job done. Directed by Brett Ratner, Rush Hour doesn't break any new ground in terms of story, stunts, or direction. It rehashes just about every "buddy" movie ever made--in fact, it makes films such as Tango and Cash seem utterly original and clever by comparison. So, why did this uninspired movie make over $120 million at the box office? Was the whole world suffering from temporary insanity? Hardly. The explanation for the success of Rush Hour is quite simple: chemistry. The casting of veteran action maestro Jackie Chan with the charming and often hilarious Chris Tucker was a serendipitous stroke of genius. Fans of Jackie Chan may be slightly disappointed by the lack of action set-pieces that emphasise his kung-fu craft. On the other hand, those who know the history of this seasoned Hong Kong actor will be able to appreciate that Rush Hour was the mainstream breakthrough that Chan had deserved for years. Coupled with the charismatic scene-stealer Tucker, Chan gets to flex his comic muscles to great effect. From their first scenes together to the trademark Chan outtakes during the end credits, their ability to play off of one another is a joy to behold, and this mischievous interaction is what saves the film from slipping into the depths of pitiful mediocrity. --Jeremy Storey

  • The Italian Job [2003] The Italian Job | DVD | (08/03/2004) from £2.24  |  Saving you £17.65 (88.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Though it bears little resemblance to the celebrated 1969 original starring Michael Caine, this 2003 remake of The Italian Job stands on its own as a caper comedy that's well above average. The title's a misnomer--this time it's actually a Los Angeles job--but the action's just as exciting as it propels a breezy tale of honour and dishonour among competing thieves. Inheriting Caine's role as ace heist-planner Charlie Croker, Mark Wahlberg plays straight-man to a well-cast team of accomplices, including Mos Def, Jason Statham and scene-stealer Seth Green in a variation of the role originally played by Noel Coward. As the daughter of Croker's ill-fated mentor (Donald Sutherland), Charlise Theron is recruited to double-cross a double-crosser (Edward Norton in oily villain mode), and once again, speedily versatile Mini Coopers (this time, the modern BMW versions) play a pivotal role in director F Gary Gray's exhilarating car-chase climax. It's perhaps the greatest product placement in movie history, and just as fun the second time around. --Jeff Shannon

  • Red 2 [Blu-ray] Red 2 | Blu Ray | (25/11/2013) from £5.39  |  Saving you £17.60 (76.60%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Retired CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) reunites his team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a nuclear device. However to succeed they need to survive an army of relentless assassins ruthless terrorists and power crazed government officials all eager to get their hands on the next-generation weapons. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris London and Moscow. Outgunned and outmanned they have only their cunning wits their old-school skills and each other to rely on as they try to save the world.

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