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  • Matrix: Reloaded [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2003] Matrix: Reloaded | UMD | (25/11/2005) from £11.59  |  Saving you £1.40 (10.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Rocky III [UMD Mini for PSP] [DVD] Rocky III | UMD | (19/12/2007) from £2.37  |  Saving you £-2.89 (-48.20%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban [UMD Universal Media Disc] Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban | UMD | (20/03/2006) from £6.40  |  Saving you £17.59 (73.30%)  |  RRP £23.99

  • Robots [UMD Universal Media Disc] Robots | UMD | (19/09/2005) from £23.59  |  Saving you £1.40 (5.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The delightful designs of William Joyce (writer/illustrator of such popular children's books as George Shrinks and Bently & Egg) make Robots a joy to behold. The round, bouncy, and ramshackle forms of hero Rodney Copperbottom and his computer-animated friends are part of an ornate a universe of elaborate contraptions and gleaming metallic surfaces. Rodney (voiced with a hint-of-Scottish lilt by Ewan McGregor) is a young inventor who sets off for Robot City to work for Big Weld (Mel Brooks), the supreme inventor of the mechanical world. But upon his arrival, Rodney discovers that Big Weld has disappeared, and the slick, shiny Ratchet (Greg Kinnear, As Good As It Gets) is phasing out the spare parts that lumpen robots need to function and replacing them with "upgrades"--expensive and glistening new exoskeletons. Unfortunately, from this suitable beginning, the story degenerates into a series of action sequences that make very little sense, though some are kinetic and fun (though others are only there to serve the inevitable Robots video game). Most kids will enjoy the sheer visual pleasure of the movie, but compared to the narrative richness of Pixar movies like The Incredibles and Toy Story, that pleasure is pretty short-lived. Also featuring the voices of Robin Williams, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, Amanda Bynes, Jennifer Coolidge, and many, many more. --Bret Fetzer

  • Matrix Revolutions [UMD Mini for PSP] Matrix Revolutions | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £7.97  |  Saving you £-1.98 (-33.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The opening reels of Matrix Revolutions do nothing to dispel the feeling of exhausted disappointment that set in during the second half of The Matrix Reloaded. There's plenty more talky guff combined with the picking-up of hard-to-remember plot threads as Neo (Keanu Reeves) lies in a coma in the "real" world and is stranded on a tube station in a limbo "beyond the Matrix" while his allies do a reprise of the shooting-their-way-past-the-bodyguards bit from the last film (this time, the baddies can walk on the ceiling). A new Oracle (Mary Alice) makes some pronouncements about the end being near and more things happen--including the evil Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) manifesting in reality by possessing a minor character and perfidiously blinding our hero, who wears a becoming ribbon over his wounded eyes and perceives the world in an impressive "flaming truth vision". What about the action? The equivalent of the last film's freeway chase scene is a huge face-off as the Sentinels (robot squids) finally breach the caverns of Zion, "the last human city", and swarm against a battalion of pilot-manipulated giant robots: here, the effects are seamless and the images astonishing, though the fact that none of the major characters are involved and the whole thing goes on so long as if designed to top any previous robot-on-robot screen carnage means that it becomes monotonously amazing, like watching someone else play a great computer game. After a too-easily-managed major realignment of the enmities, the film--and the series--finally delivers a sign-off sequence that's everything you could want as Neo and Smith get into a kung fu one-on-one in a rain-drenched virtual city, flying as high as Superman and Brainiac in smart suits. It comes too late to save the day and the wrap-up is both banal and incoherent, but at least this single combat is a reward for hardy veterans who've sat through seven hours of build-up. --Kim NewmanOn the DVD: when the first Matrix DVD was released, with never-before-seen features such as the "Follow the White Rabbit" option, it set a benchmark against which subsequent discs were judged. But neither sequel has lived up to the original's high standards. The Matrix Revolutions two-disc set is an unexceptional package, with a routine "making of" featurette being the main bonus item. Amid all the usual backslapping guff about how great everyone is and what a great time they've all had, it's possible to glean some nuggets of useful information about the baffling plot--though cast and crew can't repress a note of weariness creeping in when discussing the horribly protracted shooting schedule. The feature on the CG Revolution is the most informative for people who like to know how everything was done, and, in the same vein, there's also a multi-angle breakdown of the Super Burly Brawl. A 3-D timeline gives a handy summary of the story so far, and there's a plug for The Matrix Online game. The anamorphic 2.40:1 picture is, of course, a real treat to look at, even if the movie is mostly shades of dark grey and dark green; soundwise the dynamic range of the Dolby Digital surround is extreme: all conversations are conducted in throaty whispers, while the action sequences will push your speakers to the limit. No DTS option, though. And as with Reloaded, there's no audio commentary either: the Wachowski's policy of not talking about their creation begins to seem like a ploy to avoid answering awkward questions. --Mark Walker

  • Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire | UMD | (20/03/2006) from £2.84  |  Saving you £14.90 (57.30%)  |  RRP £25.99

    When Harry Potter's name emerges from the Goblet of Fire he becomes a competitor in a grueling battle for glory among three wizarding schools - the Triwizard Tournament. But since Harry never submitted his name for the Tournament who did? Now Harry must confront a deadly dragon fierce water demons and an enchanted maze only to find himself in the cruel grasp of He Who Must Not Be Named. In this fourth film adaptation of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series everything changes as Harry Ron and Hermione leave childhood forever and take on challenges greater than anything they could have imagined.

  • Predator [UMD Universal Media Disc] Predator | UMD | (07/11/2005) from £11.09  |  Saving you £10.90 (49.60%)  |  RRP £21.99

  • Harry Potter And Chamber of Secrets [UMD Mini for PSP] Harry Potter And Chamber of Secrets | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £11.09  |  Saving you £-5.10 (-85.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Harry ignores warnings not to return to Hogwarts, only to find the school plagued by a series of mysterious attacks and a strange voice haunting him. Manufacturer: Boulevard Entertainment

  • I, Robot [UMD Universal Media Disc] I, Robot | UMD | (05/09/2005) from £11.59  |  Saving you £10.40 (47.30%)  |  RRP £21.99

    As paranoid cop Del Spooner, Will Smith displays both his trademark quips and some impressive pectoral muscles in I, Robot. Only Spooner suspects that the robots that provide the near future with menial labor are going to turn on mankind--he's just not sure how. When a leading roboticist dies suspiciously, Spooner pursues a trail that may prove his suspicions. Don't expect much of a connection to Isaac Asimov's classic science fiction stories; I, Robot, the action movie, isn't prepared for any ruminations on the significance of artificial intelligence. This likable, efficient movie won't break any new ground, but it does have an idea or two to accompany its jolts and thrills, which puts it ahead of most recent action flicks. Also featuring Bridget Moynahan, Bruce Greenwood, and James Cromwell. --Bret Fetzer

  • 16 Blocks [UMD Mini for PSP] 16 Blocks | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £2.84  |  Saving you £-5.60 (-93.50%)  |  RRP £5.99

    From Lethal Weapon director Richard Donner comes 16 Blocks - a heart-pumping action/thriller. Bruce Willis hits the mark as Jack Mosley a broken-down New York City Police detective assigned to escort a petty criminal (Mos Def) from the precinct to the courthouse. The seemingly simple 16-block journey becomes a test of character for them when Jack's ex-partners attempt to stop them. It's the gripping story of how two men change each other during a tense 118-minutes struggle between life and death.

  • Matrix [UMD Universal Media Disc] [1998] Matrix | UMD | (23/01/2005) from £1.14  |  Saving you £-1.62 (-12.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Rush Hour [UMD Universal Media Disc] Rush Hour | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The plot line may sound familiar: Two mismatched cops are assigned as reluctant partners to solve a crime. Culturally they are complete opposites, and they quickly realize they can't stand each other. One (Jackie Chan) believes in doing things by the book. He is a man with integrity and nerves of steel. The other (Chris Tucker) is an amiable rebel who can't stand authority figures. He's a man who has to do everything on his own, much to the displeasure of his superior officer, who in turn thinks this cop is a loose cannon but tolerates him because he gets the job done. Directed by Brett Ratner, Rush Hour doesn't break any new ground in terms of story, stunts, or direction. It rehashes just about every "buddy" movie ever made--in fact, it makes films such as Tango and Cash seem utterly original and clever by comparison. So, why did this uninspired movie make over $120 million at the box office? Was the whole world suffering from temporary insanity? Hardly. The explanation for the success of Rush Hour is quite simple: chemistry. The casting of veteran action maestro Jackie Chan with the charming and often hilarious Chris Tucker was a serendipitous stroke of genius. Fans of Jackie Chan may be slightly disappointed by the lack of action set pieces that emphasize his kung-fu craft. On the other hand, those who know the history of this seasoned Hong Kong actor will be able to appreciate that Rush Hour was the mainstream breakthrough that Chan had deserved for years. Coupled with the charismatic scene-stealer Tucker, Chan gets to flex his comic muscles to great effect. From their first scenes together to the trademark Chan outtakes during the end credits, their ability to play off of one another is a joy to behold, and this mischievous interaction is what saves the film from slipping into the depths of pitiful mediocrity. --Jeremy Storey

  • Spider-Man 2 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Spider-Man 2 | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £6.30  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Transformers: The Movie [UMD Universal Media Disc] Transformers: The Movie | UMD | (12/09/2005) from £16.61  |  Saving you £-1.62 (-10.80%)  |  RRP £14.99

    During the 1980s, one cartoon series ruled the airwaves...Transformers. This paragon of consumerism was created with a dual purpose: to entertain and to galvanise children to buy the toys. Somewhere along the line, the show became a cult favourite, so in 1986 they fashioned an epic tale of good versus evil specifically for the big screen. The result looked vaguely like an animated remake of Star Wars. Who are the Transformers? The good guys are the Autobots: Optimus Prime, SoundWave, Jazz, Ultra Magnus, and many more. Their mortal enemies are the evil Decepticons, led by Megatron and StarScream. The Autobots must save their home planet from an evil entity known as Unicron (voiced by Orson Welles). At the same time, they must defend themselves from an all-out attack from the Decepticons. Along the way, lives are lost, battles are fought, and a new Autobot leader is born as another dies. The story and action never stop in a thrilling ride that often makes you forget that you're watching an 80s cartoon with inferior graphics. The violence will also come as a mild shock to those who haven't seen this film for a while--definitely a movie for the 8 and over audience. --Jeremy Storey

  • The World Is Not Enough [UMD Mini for PSP] The World Is Not Enough | UMD | (01/12/2008) from £3.25  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    In his 19th screen outing The World is Not Enough, Ian Fleming's super-spy is once again caught in the crosshairs of a self-created dilemma: as the longest-running feature-film franchise, James Bond is an annuity his producers want to protect, yet the series' consciously formulaic approach frustrates any real element of surprise beyond the rote application of plot twists or jump cuts to shake up the audience. This time out, credit 007's caretakers for making some visible attempts to invest their principal characters with darker motives--and blame them for squandering The World is Not Enough's initial promise by the final reel. By now, Bond pictures are as elegantly formal as a Bach chorale, and this one opens on an unusually powerful note. A stunning pre-title sequence reaches beyond mere pyrotechnics to introduce key plot elements as the action leaps from Bilbao to London. Pierce Brosnan undercuts his usually suave persona with a darker, more brutal edge largely absent since Sean Connery departed. Equally tantalising are our initial glimpses of Bond's nemesis du jour, Renard (Robert Carlyle), and imminent love interest, Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), both atypically complex characters cast with seemingly shrewd choices and directed by the capable Michael Apted. The story's focus on post-Soviet geopolitics likewise starts off on a savvy note, before being overtaken by increasingly Byzantine plot twists, hidden motives and reversals of loyalty superheated by relentless (if intermittently perfunctory) action sequences. Bond's grimmer demeanour, while preferable to the smirk that eventually swallowed Roger Moore whole, proves wearying, unrelieved by any true wit. The underlying psychoses that propel Renard and Elektra eventually unravel into unconvincing melodrama, while Bond is supplied with a secondary love object, Denise Richards, who is even more improbable as a nuclear physicist. Ultimately, this world is not enough despite its better intentions. --Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com On the DVD: There are three different documentaries on this disc, as well as a "Secrets of 007" featurette that cuts between specific stunt sequences, behind-the-scenes footage and storyboards to reveal how it was all done, and a short video tribute to Desmond Llewelyn ("Q"), who died not long after this movie was released. The first "making of" piece is presented by an annoyingly chirpy American woman and is aimed squarely at the MTV market (most fascinating is watching her interview with Denise Richards in which the two orthodontically enhanced ladies attempt to out-smile each other). "Bond Cocktail" gamely distils all the essential ingredients that make up the classic Bond movie formula--gadgets, girls, exotic locations and lots of action. Most interesting of all is "Bond Down River", a lengthy dissection of the opening boat chase sequence. Director Michael Apted provides the first commentary, and talks about the challenges of delivering all the requisite ingredients. The second commentary is less satisfactory, since second unit director Vic Armstrong, production designer Peter Lamont and composer David Arnold have little in common. There's also the Garbage song video, and the booklet has yet more behind-the-scenes info. The anamorphic CinemaScope picture and Dolby digital sound are as spectacular as ever. --Mark Walker

  • Hellboy [UMD Universal Media Disc] Hellboy | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £6.99  |  Saving you £3.40 (18.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • The One [UMD Universal Media Disc] The One | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £16.61  |  Saving you £1.38 (7.70%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Armageddon [UMD Universal Media Disc] Armageddon | UMD | (07/11/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £18.99

  • The Crow [UMD Universal Media Disc] The Crow | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Terminator 3 - Rise Of The Machines [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2003] Terminator 3 - Rise Of The Machines | UMD | (05/12/2005) from £4.75  |  Saving you £-4.60 (-35.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

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