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  • The Matrix Reloaded [2003] The Matrix Reloaded | DVD | (10/10/2003) from £5.12  |  Saving you £8.87 (63.40%)  |  RRP £13.99

    The Matrix Reloaded delivers added amounts of everything that the first film had, with the exception of surprises. We see more of the "real world" in the "last human city" of Zion and we go back to the 1999-look urban virtual reality of the Matrix for more encounters with artificially-intelligent baddies and--the real reason you've turned up--a lot more martial arts superheroics. The downside is that this is just part one of a two-pack of sequels, with Revolutions required to tie up the story and sort out a great deal of plot confusion. There are other problems: none of the stars have much good material to work with outside the fights and stunts, which makes the film sorely miss the mix of science fiction thrills and character interplay of the original instalment. However, the Wachowski Brothers still deliver more than enough stand-alone instant classic action sequences to make you ignore their duff script: in particular, Reeves and Hugo Weaving square off in a rumble that gets dicey, as more and more identical Weavings come out of the woodwork to pile on the lone hero; and a full quarter of an hour is devoted to a chase through the Matrix that lets Laurence Fishburne shoulder the heroic business. A last-reel encounter with a virtual God, the architect of the Matrix, finally delivers some major plot advances, but the scene is so brilliantly shot and designed--with Reeves framed against a wall of TV screens that show multiple versions of himself--that it's easy to be distracted by the decor and miss the point of what's being said. --Kim Newman On the DVD: The Matrix Reloaded two-disc set amazingly has very little in-depth stuff on this physically impressive movie; there's not even a commentary track. Perhaps the Wachowski Brothers want to keep their enigmatic aura, or perhaps there's a better DVD coming after the trilogy ends? Best here is the 30-minute feature on the incredible freeway chase: here you get the inside scoop on how the titanic 12-minute sequence was put together. There's plenty of material on the second disc, but it's just filler, with the actors talking about how great it is to work again with the Matrix team and plenty of quick edits of explosions and other "cool" things. There's a segment on product placement, 30 minutes on how the video game was created and the MTV Movie Awards parody. The features feel more like pre-movie hype than post-film deconstruction. Dolby 5.1 sound is suitably spectacular--but there's no DTS option--and the super-wide 2.40:1 picture is, of course, pin-sharp, bringing out all the lavish detail and highlighting the contrast between the green-hued Matrix and the grimy grey real world. --Doug Thomas

  • Kingdom Of Heaven Director's Cut [2005] Kingdom Of Heaven Director's Cut | DVD | (25/09/2006) from £60.91  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £29.99

    This is the version that die hard Ridley Scott fans have been waiting for an extra 40 minutes of expanded storyline that sheds more light on the motivations of key characters such as the King of Jerusalem (Edward Norton) Sibylla (Eva Green) Godfrey (Liam Neeson) and Balian (Orlando Bloom). An epic film set in Europe and the Middle East Kingdom Of Heaven follows one man's struggle to better himself and the world around him. Orlando Bloom stars as Balian a French blacksmith

  • Bad Boys 2 [2003] Bad Boys 2 | DVD | (23/02/2004) from £2.60  |  Saving you £19.76 (79.10%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Bad Boys II fulfils every audience expectation and then some: no-one goes to a movie directed by Michael Bay for delicacy and grace; you go because Bay (Armageddon, The Rock) knows how to make your bones rattle during a high-speed chase when a car flips over, spins through the air and smacks another car with a visceral crunch. Will Smith and Martin Lawrence may be mere puppets amid all this burning rubber and shrieking metal, but they actually provide a human core to the endless cascade of car wrecks and gunfights. Their easy rapport makes their personal problems--a running joke is Lawrence's attempts at anger management--as engaging as the sheer visual hullabaloo of bullets and explosions. The plot is recycled nonsense about drug lords and dead bodies being used to smuggle drugs, but the orchestration of violence is symphonic. If that's your thing, then this is for you. --Bret Fetzer

  • Looper [Blu-ray] Looper | Blu Ray | (28/01/2013) from £5.39  |  Saving you £17.60 (76.60%)  |  RRP £22.99

    In the futuristic action thriller Looper, time travel will be invented - but it will be illegal and only available on the black market. When the mob wants to get rid of someone, they will send their target 30 years into the past, where a looper - a hired gun, like Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) - is waiting to mop up. Joe is getting rich and life is good... until the day the mob decides to close the loop, sending back Joe's future self (Bruce Willis) for assassination. The film is written and directed by Rian Johnson and also stars Emily Blunt,Paul Dano, and Jeff Daniels. Ram Bergman and James D. Stern produce.

  • Gladiator (2000) - Two Disc Set Gladiator (2000) - Two Disc Set | DVD | (20/11/2000) from £2.95  |  Saving you £19.75 (79.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Ridley Scott's glossy historical epic Gladiator revitalised the classic sword 'n' sandal genre, bringing both a modern pop-culture sensibility and state-of-the-art computer-generated special effects to what had seemed like a worn-out formula. Essentially a remake of Anthony Mann's stodgy 1964 Fall of the Roman Empire, Gladiator also borrows heavily from Saving Private Ryan in its stunning opening sequence, and employs Ridley's brother Tony Scott's rapid-fire editing style for the remarkably staged Colosseum fights. The overall effect is a hugely impressive but emotionally empty spectacle complemented by Hans Zimmer's bestselling but derivative score. Russell Crowe cements his star status with a brooding, muscular performance helped along by lots of pithily quotable mock-Shakespearean dialogue. But Crowe's Maximus, along with everyone else in the film, is a disappointing two-dimensional stereotype: there's also the ridiculously melodramatic villain (Joaquin Phoenix), the old flame who's still in love with her hero (Connie Nielsen) and the trusty companion (Djimon Hounsou--who seems stuck in these roles). Richard Harris lacks the gravitas to convince as the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius, and only Oliver Reed, in his very last film, brings some depth to his world-weary ex-gladiator. Still, if Scott's film lacks the profundity of Ben-Hur, Spartacus or even Cleopatra, it remains a kinetic, exciting thrill ride that gives us some sense of what it must have been like to fight and die with a gladius in hand. On the DVD: Gladiator's two-disc set quickly became a must-have on its first release and remains one of the absolute essential DVD purchases. It set the standard both for picture and sound quality (Dolby 5.1 or DTS) as well as providing a second disc fully loaded with excellent special features. Scott's audio commentary is on the first disc, and the second has documentaries about both the history and the film, deleted scenes, storyboards, hidden "Easter Eggs" and more. --Mark Walker

  • The Last Samurai (Two Disc Edition) [2004] The Last Samurai (Two Disc Edition) | DVD | (07/05/2004) from £3.49  |  Saving you £12.50 (78.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The Last Samurai gives epic sweep to an intimate story of cultures at a crossroads as Japan undergoes tumultuous transition to a more Westernised society in 1876-77. In America, tormented Civil War veteran Captain Nathan Algren (Tom Cruise) is coerced by a mercenary officer (Tony Goldwyn) to train the Japanese Emperor's troops in the use of modern weaponry. Opposing this "progress" is a rebellion of samurai warriors, holding fast to their traditions of honour despite strategic disadvantage. As a captive of the samurai leader (Ken Watanabe), Algren learns, appreciates, and adopts the Samurai code, switching sides for a climactic battle that will put everyone's honour to the ultimate test. All of which makes director Edward Zwick's noble epic eminently worthwhile, even if its Hollywood trappings (including an all-too-conventional ending) prevent it from being the masterpiece that Zwick and screenwriter John Logan clearly wanted it to be. Instead, The Last Samurai is an elegant mainstream adventure, impressive in all aspects of its production. It may not engage the emotions as effectively as Logan's script for Gladiator, but like Cruise's character, it finds its own quality of honour. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Matrix Revolutions [2003] The Matrix Revolutions | DVD | (02/04/2004) from £4.25  |  Saving you £9.16 (65.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    The opening reels of Matrix Revolutions do nothing to dispel the feeling of exhausted disappointment that set in during the second half of The Matrix Reloaded. There's plenty more talky guff combined with the picking-up of hard-to-remember plot threads as Neo (Keanu Reeves) lies in a coma in the "real" world and is stranded on a tube station in a limbo "beyond the Matrix" while his allies do a reprise of the shooting-their-way-past-the-bodyguards bit from the last film (this time, the baddies can walk on the ceiling). A new Oracle (Mary Alice) makes some pronouncements about the end being near and more things happen--including the evil Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) manifesting in reality by possessing a minor character and perfidiously blinding our hero, who wears a becoming ribbon over his wounded eyes and perceives the world in an impressive "flaming truth vision". What about the action? The equivalent of the last film's freeway chase scene is a huge face-off as the Sentinels (robot squids) finally breach the caverns of Zion, "the last human city", and swarm against a battalion of pilot-manipulated giant robots: here, the effects are seamless and the images astonishing, though the fact that none of the major characters are involved and the whole thing goes on so long as if designed to top any previous robot-on-robot screen carnage means that it becomes monotonously amazing, like watching someone else play a great computer game. After a too-easily-managed major realignment of the enmities, the film--and the series--finally delivers a sign-off sequence that's everything you could want as Neo and Smith get into a kung fu one-on-one in a rain-drenched virtual city, flying as high as Superman and Brainiac in smart suits. It comes too late to save the day and the wrap-up is both banal and incoherent, but at least this single combat is a reward for hardy veterans who've sat through seven hours of build-up. --Kim NewmanOn the DVD: when the first Matrix DVD was released, with never-before-seen features such as the "Follow the White Rabbit" option, it set a benchmark against which subsequent discs were judged. But neither sequel has lived up to the original's high standards. The Matrix Revolutions two-disc set is an unexceptional package, with a routine "making of" featurette being the main bonus item. Amid all the usual backslapping guff about how great everyone is and what a great time they've all had, it's possible to glean some nuggets of useful information about the baffling plot--though cast and crew can't repress a note of weariness creeping in when discussing the horribly protracted shooting schedule. The feature on the CG Revolution is the most informative for people who like to know how everything was done, and, in the same vein, there's also a multi-angle breakdown of the Super Burly Brawl. A 3-D timeline gives a handy summary of the story so far, and there's a plug for The Matrix Online game. The anamorphic 2.40:1 picture is, of course, a real treat to look at, even if the movie is mostly shades of dark grey and dark green; soundwise the dynamic range of the Dolby Digital surround is extreme: all conversations are conducted in throaty whispers, while the action sequences will push your speakers to the limit. No DTS option, though. And as with Reloaded, there's no audio commentary either: the Wachowski's policy of not talking about their creation begins to seem like a ploy to avoid answering awkward questions. --Mark Walker

  • The Terminator (Two Disc Special Edition) [1985] The Terminator (Two Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (19/03/2001) from £3.15  |  Saving you £19.50 (78.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The Terminator was the film that cemented Arnold Schwarzenegger's place in the action-brawn firmament, and both his and the movie's subsequent iconic status are well deserved. He's chilling as the futuristic cyborg that kills without fear, without love, without mercy. James Cameron's story and direction are pared to the bone and are all the more chillingly effective for it. But don't overlook the contribution of Linda Hamilton, who more than holds her own as the Terminator's would-be victim, Sarah Connor, thus creating--along with Sigourney Weaver in Alien--a new generation of rugged, clear-thinking female action stars. The film's minimalist, malevolent violence is actually scarier than that of its far more expensive, more effects-laden sequel. --Anne Hurley, Amazon.com On the DVD: Rejoice, The Terminator is back, better looking and louder than ever. After years of inferior VHS versions, the cleaned-up print of this DVD is a revelation, as is the digitally remastered Dolby 5.1 soundtrack: from the opening MGM lion's roar to the crunch of Arnie's boots and the pounding of Brad Fiedel's techno-industrial score, both picture and sound are of a quality that belie the movie's age. The first disc has the movie plus a DVD-ROM feature containing three different versions of the screenplay, which can be read scene-by-scene along with the film. On the second disc there are seven deleted scenes, including a fascinating foreshadowing of Sarah Connor's mission in T2, as well as trailers and TV spots. There are also two "making of" featurettes, one being an 18-minute piece from 1992 based around a friendly at-home chat with Cameron and Schwarzenegger ("We did the first Terminator for the cost of your motor home on the second film", jokes director to actor). The hour-long "Other Voices" featurette is an in-depth montage of cast and crew reminiscences covering all aspects of the production from its initial genesis as a fevered nightmare to the "guerrilla" filmmaking of getting the final shots. Script collaborator Bill Wisher neatly sums up the movie as "It's a Wonderful Life, with guns". The second disc also contains a stills archive of production photographs, James Cameron's amazing original conceptual artwork, plus his first story treatment. If you own a player, how can you resist? After all, the Terminator movies are what DVD was invented for. --Mark Walker

  • Ali - Two Disc Set [2002] Ali - Two Disc Set | DVD | (24/06/2002) from £2.89  |  Saving you £17.10 (85.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Ali is a substantial biopic that follows the career of Cassius Clay aka Muhammad Ali from 1964--when he took the world heavyweight championship from Sonny Liston--to 1974, when he took it back from George Foreman in Zaire. Along the way, the film looks at Ali's three marriages and his problematic involvement with the Nation of Islam, which inspires him to change his name, get rid of his first wife (Jada Pinkett Smith) and turn his back on old ally Malcolm X (Mario Van Peebles). For a fiercely independent person, Michael Mann's Ali has a knack of alienating those who genuinely love him, while chasing the approval of dubious father figures such as the Reverend Elijah Mohamed, Don King and President Mobutu. Although Ali is not a hagiography--Mann urging Will Smith to get into the many layers of Ali, from the mouthy public face to the quieter private person--the question of whether either of the Liston fights were fixed isn't even raised, and the fall of Ali's career is left out in favour of a climax that draws heavily from the documentary When We Were Kings. Mann is as interested in the politics as he is in the sport (which leaves actors like Ron Silver as the coach short-changed), offering occasional cutaways to the government spies and plants in the black movements. More knockout blows are offered in the speeches than in the ring. --Kim Newman

  • New Police Story New Police Story | DVD | (05/02/2007) from £4.60  |  Saving you £11.04 (55.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    As the leader and sole survivor of a disastrous mission where his entire team is killed by a bank-robbing gang of fashion-trash punks Inspector Wing (Jackie Chan) is racked with guilt and falls into a drunken stupor. Faced with this debilitating despair can his idealistic young new partner (Nicholas Tse) pull him out of his doldrums and bring the gang to justice? Can he still go mano a mano with a kid half his age? With a young supporting cast of HK idols (Charlie Yeung and Charlene Choi of Twins pop fame in particular) Jackie Chan gets to flex his acting muscles as much as his high-kicks in a darker and broodier thriller than the typical Hong Kong actioner which still boasts plenty of ridiculously entertaining (and dangerous) physical and motor stunts!

  • Alias - Season 4 Alias - Season 4 | DVD | (21/11/2005) from £8.21  |  Saving you £36.04 (80.10%)  |  RRP £44.99

    The fourth exciting season of undercover adventures which secured a Screen Actors' Guild award for Jennifer Garner starring as Sydney Bristow! Episodes Comprise: 1. Authorised Personnel Only (Part 1) 2. Authorised Personnel Only (Part 2) 3. The Awful Truth 4. Ice 5. Welcome To Liberty Village 6. Nocturne 7. Detente 8. Echoes 9. A Man Of His Word 10. The Index 11. The Road Home 12. The Orphan 13. Tuesday 14. Nightingale 15. Pandora 16. Another Mister Sloane 17. A Clean Conscie

  • Collateral - Double Disc Edition [2004] Collateral - Double Disc Edition | DVD | (17/01/2005) from £3.89  |  Saving you £19.00 (82.60%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Collateral offers a change of pace for Tom Cruise as a ruthless contract killer, but that's just one of many reasons to recommend this well-crafted thriller. It's from Michael Mann, after all, and the director's stellar track record with crime thrillers (Thief, Manhunter, and especially Heat) guarantees a rich combination of intelligent plotting, well-drawn characters, and escalating tension, beginning here when icy hit-man Vincent (Cruise) recruits cab driver Max (Jamie Foxx) to drive him through a nocturnal tour of Los Angeles, during which he will execute five people in a 10-hour spree. While Stuart Beattie's screenplay deftly combines intimate character study with raw bursts of action (in keeping with Mann's directorial trademark), Foxx does the best work of his career to date (between his excellent performance in Ali and his title-role showcase in Ray), and Cruise is fiercely convincing as an ultra-disciplined sociopath. Jada Pinkett-Smith rises above the limitations of a supporting role, and Mann directs with the confidence of a master, turning L.A. into a third major character (much as it was in the Mann-produced TV series Robbery Homicide Division). Collateral is a bit slow at first, but as it develops subtle themes of elusive dreams and lives on the edge, it shifts into overdrive and races, with breathtaking precision, toward a nail-biting climax. --Jeff Shannon

  • Cypher [2003] Cypher | DVD | (07/02/2005) from £12.50  |  Saving you £-2.51 (-25.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    From the director of Cube comes the latest mind-blowing sci-fi experience. Seeking an escape from his lacklustre existence Morgan Sullivan takes a job as an industrial spy at a global computer corporation. Until he meets the beautiful and mysterious Rita he has no idea that his new career has been an elaborate ruse to brainwash him. Fighting to take back control of his life he realises that to save himself he must complete a final assignment one more deadly than anything that has come before.

  • Die Hard 4.0 (2 Disc Special Edition) [2007] Die Hard 4.0 (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (29/10/2007) from £2.75  |  Saving you £19.26 (77.10%)  |  RRP £24.99

    A computer genius is systematically shutting down the computer infrastructure of the US. The mysterious figure behind the scheme seems to have figured out every digital angle but he hasn't counted on an old fashioned 'analogue' cop John McClane.

  • Troy (Director's Cut) [2004] Troy (Director's Cut) | DVD | (01/10/2007) from £8.24  |  Saving you £7.75 (48.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    For honour... In 1193B.C. the dandy Trojan prince Paris (Bloom) irresponsibly spirits away the unhappy wife of Menelaus (Gleeson) the Spartan king. Demanding the return of Helen the Greeks launch a thousand ships and lay siege to Troy. Under the command of Agamemnon (Cox) revered warrior Achilles (Pitt) leads the Greek forces against the Trojan defenders commanded by Hector (Bana) who carries the fate of his nation on his shoulders...

  • Daredevil [2003] Daredevil | DVD | (14/07/2003) from £1.95  |  Saving you £14.50 (72.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Whether or not one likes Daredevil the movie probably has a lot to do with whether or not one likes Daredevil the comic book. To its credit (or, depending upon your perspective, its detriment), Daredevil is one of the most faithful comic-book adaptations to make it to the big screen. Yet in a world where the red-suited crimefighter is hardly a cultural icon in the same league as Batman and Spider-Man, that will mean very little to most filmgoers. Daredevil tells the story of Matt Murdock (Ben Affleck), a young lawyer who spent his youth getting kicked around by life in Hell's Kitchen, NYC. He's blinded at an early age in an industrial accident, but when he recovers, he discovers that his remaining senses are superhumanly acute. When his father, a boxer, is killed by gangsters for refusing to throw a fight, Matt Murdock vows to dedicate his life to fighting for what's right. To that end, he becomes a lawyer by day and a masked vigilante by night--Daredevil, the Man Without Fear. Using as its source material a classic (well, to comics fans, at least) Frank Miller story line, the film manages to find room for Daredevil's origin, his love affair with Elektra (Jennifer Garner) and his first meetings with his two arch-nemeses, Bullseye (Colin Farrell) and Kingpin (Michael Clark Duncan). Colin Farrell has fun with the psychotic Irish assassin Bullseye, who can use nearly any object as a deadly projectile (and who, as he proudly states, never misses). Michael Clark Duncan adds stone-cold menace to the Kingpin of Crime, the criminal mastermind at the nexus of New York's underworld. Yet Daredevil tries to cram too much into its relatively short running time, and ultimately it's the relationship between Matt Murdock and Elektra that suffers--Garner does all she can with the character, but she could have benefited from a bit more screen time. And the action sequences--particularly the faster-paced, Matrix-style wire fights--only succeed in making Affleck and Farrell look a bit awkward (unlike Garner, neither are natural martial artists). Still, Daredevil is a film by comic-book fans, for comic-book fans, packed with cameos and in-jokes sure to appeal to the die-hards. If that's you, then there's much to love here. --Robert Burrow

  • Troy [2004] Troy | DVD | (25/10/2004) from £3.20  |  Saving you £10.46 (65.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    There are many reasons to recommend Troy as a good ol' fashioned Hollywood epic, especially if you've never read Homer's The Iliad. Dispensing with Greek gods altogether, this earnestly massive production (budgeted at upwards of $200 million) will surely offend historians and devoted students of the classics. But there's politics aplenty in the grand-scale war that erupts when Trojan prince Paris (Orlando Bloom) makes off with Helen (blandly beautiful German model Diane Kruger), wife of Spartan ruler Menelaus (Brendan Gleeson), whose brother, the Greek king Agamemnon (Brian Cox) prods him into enraged retaliation. Greek warrior Achilles (Brad Pitt) brings lethal force to his battles (and there are many of them, mostly impressive), and his Trojan counterpart, Paris's brother Hector (Eric Bana), adds even more buffed-up beefcake to a film so chock-full o' hunks that there's barely room for Peter O'Toole (doing fine work as Trojan king Priam) and even less for Julie Christie, appearing ever-so-briefly as Achilles's melancholy mother. The drama is nearly as arid as the sun-baked locations (Mexico and Malta) that stand in for the Aegean coast, and many critics suggested that Pitt (who valiantly tries to give Achilles some tormented dimension) was simply miscast. But when you consider that Wolfgang Petersen also made The Perfect Storm, there's nothing wrong with enjoying Troy as a semi-guilty pleasure with a touch of ancient class. --Jeff Shannon

  • I Am Legend (Special edition) [2007] I Am Legend (Special edition) | DVD | (21/04/2008) from £2.97  |  Saving you £16.95 (73.70%)  |  RRP £22.99

    When you're the last of the uninfected you can only count on yourself. Robert Neville is the last man alive. He busies himself with preparing for a nightly attack from the rest of the world - all of which have transformed into blood-thirsty vampires. Based on the epoch-making sci-fi novel by acclaimed author Richard Matheson.

  • Heroes Season 4 [DVD] Heroes Season 4 | DVD | (04/10/2010) from £13.90  |  Saving you £31.09 (69.10%)  |  RRP £44.99

    Heroes is an action-packed US drama following the lives of ordinary people who discover they have extraordinary abilities. Their only destiny is to save the world.

  • Gladiator - Special Edition (2000) Gladiator - Special Edition (2000) | DVD | (12/09/2005) from £5.99  |  Saving you £13.17 (65.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    What We Do In Life Echoes In Eternity. Winner of 5 Academy Awards statuettes including Best Picture and Best Actor; Gladiator receives the 'Extended Special Edition' treatment. Personally overseen by director Ridley Scott this 3-disc edition is loaded with new bonus materials and features 17 minutes of additional footage not shown in cinemas. This is the ultimate Gladiatorial experience! The great Roman General Maximus (Russell Crowe) has once again led the le

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