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  • Blood Simple [Blu-ray] Blood Simple | Blu Ray | (30/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The debut film of director Joel Coen and his brother-producer Ethan Coen, 1983's Blood Simple is grisly comic noir that marries the feverish toughness of pulp thrillers with the ghoulishness of even pulpier horror. (Imagine the novels of Jim Thompson somehow fused with the comic tabloid Weird Tales and you get the idea.) The story concerns a Texas bar owner (Dan Hedaya) who hires a seedy private detective (M Emmett Walsh) to follow his cheating wife (Frances McDormand in her first film appearance) and then kill her and her lover (John Getz). The gumshoe turns the tables on his client and suddenly a bad situation gets much, much worse, with some violent goings-on that are as elemental as they are shocking. (A scene in which a character who has been buried alive suddenly emerges from his own grave instantly becomes an archetypal nightmare.) Shot by Barry Sonnenfeld before he became an A-list director in Hollywood, Blood Simple established the hyperreal look and feel of the Coens' productions (undoubtedly inspired a bit by filmmaker Sam Raimi, whose The Evil Dead had just been coedited by Joel). Sections of the film have proved to be an endurance test for art-house movie fans, particularly an extended climax that involves one shock after another but ends with a laugh at the absurdity of criminal ambition. This is definitely one of the triumphs of the 1980s and the American independent film scene in general. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Personal Shopper [Blu-ray] Personal Shopper | Blu Ray | (17/07/2017) from £9.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A personal shopper in Paris refuses to leave the city until she makes contact with her twin brother who previously died there. Her life becomes more complicated when a mysterious person contacts her via text message.

  • Personal Shopper [DVD] Personal Shopper | DVD | (17/07/2017) from £6.49  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A personal shopper in Paris refuses to leave the city until she makes contact with her twin brother who previously died there. Her life becomes more complicated when a mysterious person contacts her via text message.

  • American Beauty [Blu-ray] American Beauty | Blu Ray | (14/02/2011) from £6.49  |  Saving you £13.50 (67.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    From its first gliding aerial shot of a generic suburban street, American Beauty moves with a mesmerising confidence and acuity epitomised by Kevin Spacey's calm narration. Spacey is Lester Burnham, a harried Everyman whose midlife awakening is the spine of the story, and his very first lines hook us with their teasing fatalism--like Sunset Boulevard's Joe Gillis, Burnham tells us his story from beyond the grave. It's an audacious start for a film that justifies that audacity. Weaving social satire, domestic tragedy and whodunit into a single package, Alan Ball's first theatrical script dares to blur generic lines and keep us off balance, winking seamlessly from dark, scabrous comedy to deeply moving drama. The Burnham family joins the cinematic short-list of great dysfunctional American families, as Lester is pitted against his manic, materialistic realtor wife, Carolyn (Annette Bening, making the most of a mostly unsympathetic role) and his sullen, contemptuous teenaged daughter, Jane (Thora Birch, utterly convincing in her edgy balance of self-absorption and wistful longing). Into their lives come two catalytic outsiders. A young cheerleader (Mena Suvari) jolts Lester into a sexual epiphany that blooms into a second adolescence. And an eerily calm young neighbour (Wes Bentley) transforms both Lester and Jane with his canny influence. Credit another big-screen newcomer, English theatrical director Sam Mendes, with expertly juggling these potentially disjunctive elements into a superb ensemble piece that achieves a stylised pace without lapsing into transparent self-indulgence. Mendes has shrewdly insured his success with a solid crew of stage veterans, yet he has also made an inspired discovery in Bentley, whose Ricky Fitts becomes a fulcrum for both plot and theme. Cinematographer Conrad Hall's sumptuous visual design further elevates the film, infusing the beige interiors of the Burnhams' lives with vivid bursts of deep crimson, the colour of roses--and of blood. --Sam Sutherland

  • Strangers On  A Train (1951) Strangers On A Train (1951) | DVD | (09/04/2001) from £4.75  |  Saving you £9.24 (66.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    From its cleverly choreographed opening sequence to its heart-stopping climax on a rampant carousel, this 1951 Hitchcock classic readily earns its reputation as one of the director's finest examples of timeless cinematic suspense. It's not just a ripping-good thriller but a film student's delight and a perversely enjoyable battle of wits between tennis pro Guy (Farley Granger) and his mysterious, sycophantic admirer, Bruno (Robert Walker), who proposes a "criss-cross" scheme of traded murders. Bruno agrees to kill Guy's unfaithful wife, in return for which Guy will (or so it seems) kill Bruno's spiteful father. With an emphasis on narrative and visual strategy, Hitchcock controls the escalating tension with a master's flair for cinematic design, and the plot (coscripted by Raymond Chandler) is so tightly constructed that you'll be white-knuckled even after multiple viewings. Strangers on a Train remains one of Hitchcock's crowning achievements and a suspenseful classic that never loses its capacity to thrill and delight. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Hound Of The Baskervilles [1959] The Hound Of The Baskervilles | DVD | (20/10/2003) from £5.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (53.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Sherlock Holmes gets the Gothic treatment in Hammer's Hound of the Baskervilles, a typical mix of mystery and supernatural horror from the famous studio. Peter Cushing is perfectly cast as the great detective, the very embodiment of science and reason (which also made him a great Van Helsing in the Dracula series) in a case wound around a legacy of aristocratic cruelty and a devilish dog wandering the swampy moors. Christopher Lee is a less satisfying fit as the last of the Baskervilles, as he waffles between fear and apathetic disregard, but Andre Morell is a fine Dr Watson and a far cry from Nigel Bruce's sweet bumbler from the Hollywood incarnation of the 1940s. Director Terence Fisher was Hammer's top stylist and the film drips with the mood of the moors, mist hanging in the air, the dying vegetation itself threatening to come to life and trap the next unwary traveller. --Sean Axmaker

  • Essex Boys [2000] Essex Boys | DVD | (02/07/2001) from £3.81  |  Saving you £7.86 (60.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Essex Boys constructs a fictional story around the infamous Range Rover murders in Rettenden, Essex, in which three local drug dealers were found blasted to death by shotguns. Driving for ex-con Jason Locke (Sean Bean) was just another job for Billy Reynolds (Charlie Creed-Miles). But fresh out of a five-year stretch, Locke is looking to make up for lost time and begins a turf war. He stalks his manor with a menacing leer and a bottle of acid to throw in the face of anyone who gets in his way, and is given to Locke and his drug-dealing gang rely on brute strength to enforce their will, but when they decide to expand their game they underestimate the wiles of Billy's boss, countrified crime gent John Dyke. Southend's sunset strip of neon-fronted clubs and arcades, but fails to lift the plot of his film out of the Brit-gangster ghetto. That said, Winsor laudably plays it straight, avoiding the style over substance affectations of the genre, while coaxing believable performances out of his cast. --Chris CampionOn the DVD: the anamorphic 1.85:1 widescreen transfer is good with little obvious grain and an above average level of detail. But it is the soundtrack that's really the star of this DVD. The intensity of the film and the relentless action from the outset (where you are thrust into the middle of a crowded nightclub) is really upped by the brilliant Dolby Digital 5.1 audio mix, resulting in the viewer feeling every gunshot. It's a good job that the soundtrack is so spectacular, since there are no special features except the usual suspects, the original theatrical trailer and scene access. --Kristen BowditchEssex Boys constructs a fictional story around the infamous Range Rover murders in Rettenden, Essex, in which three local drug dealers were found blasted to death by shotguns. Driving for ex-con Jason Locke (Sean Bean) was just another job for Billy Reynolds (Charlie Creed-Miles). But fresh out of a five-year stretch, Locke is looking to make up for lost time and begins a turf war. He stalks his manor with a menacing leer and a bottle of acid to throw in the face of anyone who gets in his way, and is given to humiliating publicly his long-suffering wife Lisa (Alex Kingston). Locke and his drug-dealing gang rely on brute strength to enforce their will, but when they decide to expand their game they underestimate the wiles of Billy's boss, countrified crime gent John Dyke. Director Terry Winsor makes good use of locations, especially Southend's sunset strip of neon-fronted clubs and arcades, but fails to lift the plot of his film out of the Brit-gangster ghetto. That said, Winsor laudably plays it straight, avoiding the style over substance affectations of the genre, while coaxing believable performances out of his cast. --Chris Campion

  • The Game [1997] The Game | DVD | (09/11/2007) from £3.05  |  Saving you £12.94 (80.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    It's not quite as clever as it tries to be, but The Game does a tremendous job of presenting the story of a rigid control freak trapped in circumstances that are increasingly beyond his control. Michael Douglas plays a rich, divorced, and dreadful investment banker whose 48th birthday reminds him of his father's suicide at the same age. He's locked in the cage of his own misery until his rebellious younger brother (Sean Penn) presents him with a birthday invitation to play "The Game" (described as "an experiential Book of the Month Club")--a mysterious offering from a company called Consumer Recreation Services. Before he knows the game has even begun, Douglas is caught up in a series of unexplained events designed to strip him of his tenuous security and cast him into a maelstrom of chaos. How do you play a game that hasn't any rules? That's what Douglas has to figure out, and he can't always rely on his intelligence to form logic out of what's happening to him. Seemingly cast as the fall guy in a conspiracy thriller, he encounters a waitress (Deborah Unger) who may or may not be trustworthy, and nothing can be taken at face value in a world turned upside down. Douglas is great at conveying the sheer panic of his character's dilemma, and despite some lapses in credibility and an anticlimactic ending, The Game remains a thinking person's thriller that grabs and holds your attention. Thematic resonance abounds between this and Seven and Fight Club, two of the other films by The Game 's director David Fincher. -- Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Capricorn One [Blu-ray] Capricorn One | Blu Ray | (04/08/2014) from £8.29  |  Saving you £6.70 (44.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    As the whole world watches the first manned flight to Mars, its three astronauts are plunged into a nightmarish battle for survival. Elliot Gould, James Brolin, Sam Waterston, Brenda Vaccaro, O.J. Simpson and Telly Savalas star in this classic sci-fi conspiracy thriller, featured here in a brand-new High Definition transfer from original film elements. Minutes before the launch of their mission, the Capricorn One crew are told to exit their capsule and are secretly taken to an abandoned d.

  • True Romance [Blu-ray] [1993] True Romance | Blu Ray | (06/07/2009) from £6.15  |  Saving you £11.84 (65.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Two lovers (Christian Slater Patricia Arquette) are thrust into a dangerous game of high-stakes negotiations and high-speed adventure. The pair come into unexpected possession of a suitcase of mob contraband. Fleeing to Los Angeles they hope to sell the goods and begin a new life. But both sides of the law have other ideas...

  • The Big Heat (Dual Format Limited Edition) [Blu-ray] The Big Heat (Dual Format Limited Edition) | Blu Ray | (27/03/2017) from £15.95  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    There's a satisfying sense of closure to the definitive noir kick achieved in The Big Heat: its director, Fritz Lang, had forged early links from German expressionism to the emergence of film noir, so it's entirely logical that the expatriate director would help codify the genre with this brutal 1953 film. Visually, his scenes exemplify the bold contrasts, deep shadows, and heightened compositions that define the look of noir, and he matches that success with the darkly pessimistic themes of this revenge melodrama. The story coheres around the suicide of a crooked cop, and the subsequent struggle of an honest detective, Dave Bannion (Glenn Ford), to navigate between a corrupt city government and a ruthless mobster to uncover the truth. Initially, the violence here seems almost timid by comparison to the more explicit carnage now commonplace in films, yet the story accelerates as its plot arcs toward Bannion's showdown with kingpin Lagana (Alexander Scourby) and his psychotic henchman, the sadistic Vince Stone, given an indelible nastiness by Lee Marvin. When Bannion's wife is killed by a car bomb intended for the detective, both the hero and the story go ballistic: suspended from the force, he embarks on a crusade of revenge that suggests a template for Charles Bronson's Death Wish films, each step pushing Lagana and Stone toward a showdown. Bodies drop, dominoes tumbled by the escalating war between the obsessed Bannion and his increasingly vicious adversaries. Lang's disciplined visual design and the performances (especially those of Ford, Marvin, Jeanette Nolan as the dead cop's scheming widow, and Gloria Grahame as Marvin's girlfriend) enable the film to transcend formula, as do several memorable action scenes--when an enraged Marvin hurls scalding coffee at the feisty Debby (Grahame), we're both shattered by the violence of his attack, and aware that he's shifted the balance of power. --Sam Sutherland

  • Kiss Me Deadly [1955] Kiss Me Deadly | DVD | (04/08/2003) from £4.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (61.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A terrific film noir full of skewed camera angles and mysterious whose-shoes-are-those shots, Kiss Me Deadly is about as dark and exciting as noir gets. A young woman (Cloris Leachman) in bare feet and a trench coat throws herself into the traffic to flag down help and the car she stops belongs to detective Mike Hammer. Not even 15 minutes into the film and there's already been a murder, a mysterious letter, an attempt to kill Hammer and, of course, a warning to stay out of it. Hammer, tired of lowlife divorce cases, smells something big and can't let it go. Mike Hammer is a detective so cool he can win a fight with nothing more than a box of popcorn as a weapon; he knows his opera singers as well as his amateur prize-fighters and he makes the ladies swoon--but he's far from a conventional hero. In fact, he's emphatically not a nice guy; Hammer happily whores out his secretary-girlfriend Velma to cinch up those divorce cases and has a penchant for slamming other people's fingers in drawers. Even the bad guys know he's a sleazebag ("What's it worth to you to turn your considerable talents back to the gutter you crawled out of?"). Ralph Meeker plays Hammer's ambivalence brilliantly, swinging easily between sexy and just plain mean. --Ali Davis

  • Fragment of Fear [Blu-ray] Fragment of Fear | Blu Ray | (30/10/2017) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Based on the novel A Fragment of Fear by former M15 spy John Bingham, 7th Baron Clanmorris, this stylish cine-trip from Vanishing Point director Richard C. Sarafian features David Hemmings and Gayle Hunnicutt (then real-life husband and wife) falling into a waking nightmare of murder, mystery and paranoia. INDICATOR LIMITED EDITION SPECIAL FEATURES: High Definition remaster Original mono audio David Kipen on author John Bingham and screenwriter Paul Dehn (2017, tbc mins) Interview with assistant director William P. Cartlidge (2017, tbc mins) Original theatrical trailer Image gallery: on-set and promotional photography New and improved English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing Limited edition exclusive booklet with a new essay by Johnny Mains, an overview of contemporary critical responses, and historic articles on the film World premiere on Blu-ray Limited Edition of 3,000 copies

  • Filth [DVD] [2013] Filth | DVD | (10/02/2014) from £3.27  |  Saving you £15.51 (77.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson (James McAvoy) wants a promotion. He is clearly the best man for the job - the rest of his colleagues are just idiots. Annoyingly there's been a murder and Bruce's boss wants results. No problem for Bruce. He's in control and when he solves the case and wins the promotion his wife will return to him. No problem. But is life that simple? Is Bruce the man he really thinks he is? The tragic hilarious and memorable answers unfold in Filth... Directed by Jon S. Baird from his own screenplay Filth stars James McAvoy in the leading role with a supporting cast that includes Jamie Bell Jim Broadbent Imogen Poots Eddie Marsan Joanne Froggatt Gary Lewis Emun Elliott and John Sessions.

  • The Family [DVD] The Family | DVD | (31/03/2014) from £3.99  |  Saving you £14.00 (77.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    A mafia boss and his family are relocated to a sleepy town in France under the Witness Protection Program after snitching on the mob to save their own skin. However despite Agent Stansfields (Tommy Lee Jones) best efforts to keep them in line Fred Blake (Robert DeNiro) his wife Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer) and their children can't help but resort to old habits by handling all their problems the 'family' way. Chaos ensues as their former mafia cronies try to track them down and scores are settled in the unlikeliest of settings.

  • The Hand That Rocks The Cradle [1992] The Hand That Rocks The Cradle | DVD | (05/02/2001) from £4.19  |  Saving you £10.80 (72.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    A potboiler featuring a demented caretaker and a seemingly hapless suburban family, this is The Nanny of the 1990s. However, it is much more predictable than that 1965 Bette Davis psychodrama, and more graphic. It works only because Rebecca De Mornay makes us intensely uncomfortable as the disturbed au pair who wants to take care of much more than her employer's well-being. Annabella Sciorra plays the perfect mother of a flawless family. Her obstetrician, however, is less than wonderful, having enjoyed her examination much more than he should have. When she files sexual harassment charges against the repugnant doctor, he loses face--literally--after shooting himself in the head. Several months later, an ideal nanny shows up at her home. You guessed it--she's the doc's widow. The movie follows a tried and trusted formula, with the audience in on everything. However, the story does surprise us in intense and intimate ways. The visit to the obstetrician is one of the creepiest moments in the film. You definitely hear the voice of writer Amanda Silver in a plot concerned with the vulnerabilities of a family, a newborn, a marriage. Since we know so much up front, there is an overall lack of inventiveness in the plot machinations. It may not jolt us, but De Mornay does. It's unsettling to watch someone who appears so attractive and who behaves so kindly suddenly reveal hideous psychopathic tendencies. Restraining herself from going over the top, she instead oozes such malevolence you'll want to shudder. --Rochelle O'Gorman

  • Cottage To Let [1941] Cottage To Let | DVD | (05/02/2007) from £6.48  |  Saving you £3.51 (35.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A wartime cottage on a Scottish estate becomes a focus of attention when not only the new tenant but a London evacuee and a downed fighter pilot all move in. The interest may not be unconnected with the fact that the landowner is also a key British military inventor. For a start the butler is obviously a Scotland Yard flatfoot.

  • The Birds [1963] The Birds | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £3.69  |  Saving you £6.30 (63.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Vacationing in northern California, Alfred Hitchcock was struck by a story in a Santa Cruz newspaper: "Seabird Invasion Hits Coastal Homes". From this peculiar incident, and his memory of a short story by Daphne du Maurier, the master of suspense created one of his strangest and most terrifying films. The Birds follows a chic blonde, Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), as she travels to the coastal town of Bodega Bay to hook up with a rugged fellow (Rod Taylor) she's only just met. Before long the town is attacked by marauding birds, and Hitchcock's skill at staging action is brought to the fore. Beyond the superb effects, however, The Birds is also one of Hitchcock's most psychologically complicated scenarios, a tense study of violence, loneliness, and complacency. What really gets under your skin are not the bird skirmishes but the anxiety and the eerie quiet between attacks. The director elevated an unknown model, Tippi Hedren (mother of Melanie Griffith), to being his latest cool, blond leading lady, an experience that was not always easy on the much-pecked Ms. Hedren. Still, she returned for the next Hitchcock picture, the underrated Marnie. Treated with scant attention by serious critics in 1963, The Birds has grown into a classic and--despite the sci-fi trappings--one of Hitchcock's most serious films. --Robert Horton

  • Hide And Seek [2005] Hide And Seek | DVD | (25/07/2005) from £2.59  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Dakota Fanning--the elfin star of Uptown Girls, The Cat in the Hat, and Man on Fire--trades in her blond locks for a semi-gothic brunette do in Hide and Seek. Fanning plays Emily, a young girl whose mother commits suicide. To help Emily through the trauma, her father David (Robert DeNiro), a psychologist, takes her to an isolated house in upstate New York. But instead of healing, Emily gets dark circles under her eyes, mutilates her favorite doll, and develops an imaginary friend named Charlie. In no time at all, things get spooky and David suspects this imaginary friend isn't so friendly. Hide and Seek owes a lot to The Shining, but whether the creepiness is borrowed or not, there's a decent dose of it (though the twist at the end is unlikely to surprise many viewers). DeNiro does his job with professional gloss, but Fanning carries the movie; she's got the kind of charisma that goes beyond acting ability--that ineffable glow that makes an audience want to watch her. --Bret Fetzer, Amazon.com

  • The Tracy & Hepburn Signature Collection (2011) [DVD] [1942] The Tracy & Hepburn Signature Collection (2011) | DVD | (19/09/2011) from £9.99  |  Saving you £18.51 (61.70%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Titles Comprise: Woman of the Year Keeper of the Flame Adam's Rib Pat And Mike

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