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  • Blade Runner: The Final Cut (2-Disc Special Edition) Blade Runner: The Final Cut (2-Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (03/12/2007) from £5.45  |  Saving you £11.54 (67.90%)  |  RRP £16.99

    This is Blade Runner: The Final Cut Ridley Scott's definitive new version of his science-fiction masterpiece. Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) prowls the steel-and-microchip jungle of 21st-century Los Angeles. He's a ""blade runner"" stalking geneticaly made criminal replicants. His assignment: kill them. Their crime: wanting to be human.

  • Arrival [DVD] Arrival | DVD | (20/03/2017) from £5.00  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    When mysterious spacecraft touch down across the globe, an elite team led by expert linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) are brought together to investigate. As mankind teeters on the verge of global war, Banks and the team race against time for answers and to find them, she will take a chance that could threaten her life, and quite possibly humanity's very existence.

  • Red Dwarf - Series XI [DVD] [2016] Red Dwarf - Series XI | DVD | (14/11/2016) from £8.29  |  Saving you £1.70 (17.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The Emmy-winning comedy returns for an 11th outing, with the original cast and a host of guest stars on board. The series sees two of the Dwarfers' dreams come true: Rimmer accidentally saves a Space Corp Captain and is promoted to Officer, while Cat takes time off from loving himself to fall in love with a female cat with a very big secret. Lister wakes up to discover a deranged droid has stolen his body parts and Kryten has a mid-life crisis and changes his body cover from grey to Ferrari red. With big laughs and dazzling effects, Red Dwarf XI continues on from the award-winning Red Dwarf X and recaptures the show's golden age.

  • Arrival [Blu-ray] Arrival | Blu Ray | (20/03/2017) from £7.78  |  Saving you £-0.79 (-11.30%)  |  RRP £6.99

    When mysterious spacecraft touch down across the globe, an elite team led by expert linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) are brought together to investigate. As mankind teeters on the verge of global war, Banks and the team race against time for answers and to find them, she will take a chance that could threaten her life, and quite possibly humanity's very existence.

  • Blade Runner: The Final Cut [Blu-ray] Blade Runner: The Final Cut | Blu Ray | (03/12/2007) from £7.95  |  Saving you £0.04 (0.50%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) prowls the steel-and-microchip jungle of 21st century Los Angeles. He's a blade runner stalking genetically made criminal replicants. His assignment: kill them. Their crime: wanting to be human. The story of Blade Runner is familiar to countless fans. But few have seen it like this. Because this is director Ridley Scott's own vision of his sci-fi classic. This new version omits Deckard's voiceover narration develops in slightly greater detail the romance between Deckard and Rachael (Sean Young) and removes the uplifting finale. The result is a heightened emotional impact: a great film made greater. Most intriguing of all is a newly included unicorn vision that suggests Deckard may be a replicant. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Is Deckard a replicant? As with all things in the future you must discover the answer to find yourself

  • Red Dwarf - Back To Earth [DVD] Red Dwarf - Back To Earth | DVD | (15/06/2009) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Cult comedy Red Dwarf is returning to TV 21 years after its initial launch. The show has been resurrected by digital channel Dave for a three-part Easter weekend special which sees the cast finally return to Earth. Written and directed by Red Dwarf co-creator Doug Naylor the new show reunites the line-up including Coronation Street's Craig Charles.

  • The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy [1981] The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy | DVD | (28/01/2002) from £7.05  |  Saving you £17.18 (68.70%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The original BBC radio adventures of Arthur Dent (an ape-descendant whose anger at the apparently inexplicable destruction of his home planet Earth, situated in an obscure corner of the outer spiral arm of the galaxy, is expressed in frequent irritation at friendly automatic doors and vending machines) and his travelling companions, Ford Prefect (an itinerant towel-carrying hitch-hiker originally from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse), Zaphod Beeblebrox (the notorious ex-Galactic President and patron of Eccentrica Galumbits, the triple-breasted whore of Eroticon Six) and Marvin the Paranoid Android (who's still suffering from that terrible pain in all the diodes down his left side) proved to be such a success for the BBC that its transition to TV was (almost) inevitable. In 1981 several key members of the radio cast made the move to the small screen. Simon Jones' bewildered Arthur Dent remains the central character, shambling around in his dressing gown (a fact easy to forget on radio); Mark Wing-Davey's Zaphod Beeblebrox is the same as his boastful radio persona, even if the second head utterly fails to convince. Unfortunately, newcomers David Dixon (as Ford Prefect) and the irritating Sandra Dickinson (as Trillian) are no match for their radio predecessors.The problem here is not so much the low-budget look as the script itself, which is lovingly faithful to the radio series in a way that Douglas Adams' novels aren't. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was a lucid, satirical, occasionally profound, utterly unique comic invention on radio. As such, it has nothing to gain from TV. The script needs no visual elaboration--that's best left to the listener's own imagination. Only the animated renditions of the Guide itself enhance Peter Jones' wonderfully dry narration; otherwise--paradoxically, perhaps--by supplying images the concept is oddly diminished here.On the DVD: A suitably eclectic not to say eccentric collection of extra features makes this a wholly satisfying two-disc set, neatly packaged in a fold-out slipcase. On the second disc there's an hour-long "making of" documentary from 1992 featuring contributions from the cast and crew, including Douglas Adams; and then there's even more in a 20-minute section entitled "Don't Panic!". A fascinating behind-the-scenes peek at filming as the clock runs out on studio time and a look at the recording of the original radio series complete the first part. Then navigate to the "Outer Planets" to find outtakes, a deleted scene, Zaphod's animatronic second head on Tomorrow's World and Peter Jones's witty and shambolic introduction to the first episode, plus more besides. The series itself is presented in standard 4:3 ratio and Dolby stereo. --Mark Walker

  • Flight of the Navigator [DVD] Flight of the Navigator | DVD | (19/11/2012) from £6.69  |  Saving you £9.30 (58.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Flight of the Navigator is the action-packed classic 80s adventure into another world. It's 1978 and 12-year-old David Freeman is knocked unconcious while playing. He wakes up and discovers it's now 1986 and he's been missing for eight years. NASA believes he's been abducted by aliens and want to use him for their research. But with the guidance of a strange unseen entity he discovers a hidden spacehsip and with the help of MAX the computer sets off on an incredible mission to get back to the past where he belongs. Special Features: Commentary by Director Randal Kleiser

  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind - 40th Anniversary [Blu-ray  + Bonus Disc] [2017] Close Encounters of the Third Kind - 40th Anniversary | Blu Ray | (09/10/2017) from £7.69  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Released in 1977, Close Encounters of the Third Kind was that year's cerebral alternative to Star Wars. It's arguably the archetypal Spielberg film, featuring a fantasy-meets-reality storyline (to be developed further in E.T.), a misunderstood Everyman character (Richard Dreyfuss), apparently hostile government agents (long before The X-Files), a sense of childlike awe in the face of the otherworldly, and a sweeping feel for epic film-making learned from the classic school of David Lean. Contributing to the film's overall success are the Oscar-winning cinematography from Vilmos Zsigmond, Douglas Trumbull's lavish effects and an extraordinary score from John Williams that develops from eerie atonality à la Ligeti to the gorgeous sentiment of "When You Wish Upon a Star" over the end credits. Not content with the final result, Spielberg tinkered with the editing and inserted some new scenes to make a "Special Edition" in 1980 which ran three minutes shorter than the original, then made further revisions to create a slightly longer "Collector's Edition" in 1998. This later version deletes the mothership interior scenes that were inserted in the "Special Edition" and restores the original ending. On the DVD: CE3K is packaged here with confusing documentation that fails to make clear any differences between earlier versions of the film and this "Collector's Edition"--worse, the back cover blurb misleadingly implies that this disc is the 1980 "Special Edition" edit. It is not. A gorgeous anamorphic widescreen print of Spielberg's 1998 "Collector's Edition" edit occupies the first disc: this is the version with the original theatrical ending restored but new scenes from the "Special Edition" retained. The second disc rounds up sundry deleted scenes that were either dropped from the original version or never made it into the film at all--fans of the "Special Edition" can find the mothership interior sequence here. The excellent "making-of" documentary dates from 1997 and has interviews with almost everyone involved, including the director speaking from the set of Saving Private Ryan. Thankfully the superb picture and sound of the feature make this set entirely compelling and more than compensate for the inadequate packaging. --Mark Walker

  • The Lobster [DVD] The Lobster | DVD | (08/02/2016) from £6.45  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Starring Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, Olivia Colman, Ashley Jensen, John C Reilly, Lea Seydoux, Michael Smiley and Ben Whishaw, THE LOBSTER is a darkly funny love story set in a near future where finding love is a matter of life or death According to the rules of The City, single people are arrested and then transferred to The Hotel. There they are obliged to find a matching mate in 45 days. If they fail, they are transformed into an animal of their choosing and released into The Woods. A desperate Man (Farrell), escapes from The Hotel to The Woods where The Loners live and falls in love, although it is against their rules. Unconventional, original and hilarious, The Lobster is one of the must-see film releases of the year.

  • Flash Gordon [1980] Flash Gordon | DVD | (04/08/2008) from £6.59  |  Saving you £6.40 (49.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Flash - a-ah - he'll save every one of us! Ming the Merciless Emperor of planet Mongo has begun his plan of destruction for planet Earth. Zarkov a mad scientist detects the signs of an intergalactic assault and forces Flash Gordon star football player and the beautiful Dale Arden to board his rocket and save the human race from the evil Emperor. Can Flash save the universe?

  • 2001: A Space Odyssey [1968] 2001: A Space Odyssey | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.45  |  Saving you £8.54 (61.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Confirming that art and commerce can co-exist, 2001: A Space Odyssey was the biggest box-office hit of 1968, remains the greatest science fiction film yet made and is among the most revolutionary, challenging and debated work of the 20th century. It begins within a pre-historic age. A black monolith uplifts the intelligence of a group of apes on the African plains. The most famous edit in cinema introduces the 21st century, and after a second monolith is found on the moon a mission is launched to Jupiter. On the spacecraft are Bowman (Keir Dullea) and Poole (Gary Lockwood), along with the most famous computer in fiction, HAL. Their adventure will be, as per the original title, a "journey beyond the stars". Written by science fiction visionary Arthur C Clarke and Stanley Kubrick, 2001 elevated the SF film to entirely new levels, being rigorously constructed with a story on the most epic of scales. Four years in the making and filmed in 70 mm, the attention to detail is staggering and four decades later barely any aspect of the film looks dated, the visual richness and elegant pacing creating the sense of actually being in space more convincingly than any other film. A sequel, 2010: Odyssey Two (1984) followed, while Solaris (1972), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), The Abyss (1989) and A.I. (2001) are all indebted to this absolute classic which towers monolithically over them all. On the DVD: There is nothing but the original trailer which, given the status of the film and the existence of an excellent making-of documentary shown on Channel 4 in 2001, is particularly disappointing. Shortly before he died Kubrick supervised the restoration of the film and the production of new 70 mm prints for theatrical release in 2001. Fortunately the DVD has been taken from this material and transferred at the 70 mm ratio of 2.21-1. There is some slight cropping noticeable, but both anamorphically enhanced image and Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack (the film was originally released with a six-channel magnetic sound) are excellent, making this transfer infinitely preferable to previous video incarnations. --Gary S Dalkin

  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy [2005] The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy | DVD | (05/09/2005) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.31 (70.90%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Don't panic... Mere seconds before the Earth is to be demolished by an alien construction crew English everyman Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman) is swept off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect (Mos Def) who is actually not human but an alien researcher penning a new edition of the essential travel tome known as ""The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy"". Landing aboard a spaceship from the Vogon Constructor Fleet which has just obliterated the Earth Arthur is flun

  • Terminator 2 - Judgment Day [1991] Terminator 2 - Judgment Day | DVD | (04/08/2008) from £7.69  |  Saving you £5.30 (40.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The Terminator (Arnold Schwarzenegger) a cyborg sent back through time joins forces with Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton) a woman haunted by nightmares of mankind's inevitable nuclear destiny. Together they must protect her son John (Edward Furlong) - the boy destined to lead the freedom fighters of the future - from the deadliest machine ever created the liquid metal T-1000 (Robert Patrick).

  • Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace [1999] Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace | DVD | (20/09/2004) from £3.05  |  Saving you £11.00 (55.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    George Lucas transports audiences back to the future with Star Wars: Episode I, The Phantom Menace, the first instalment of a prequel trilogy in which the director imagines the foundation for the entire six-part saga. Reflecting the symbolic and mythological bases of at least five story arcs, The Phantom Menace wields a newly emerged, youthful vibrancy courtesy of Lucas' invigorating return to the director's chair and his healthy respect for the emotional sources of fantasy. Despite receiving a storm of adverse criticism (notably for Jar Jar Binks) Lucas continually fascinates with his ability to place his characters--some new, some old, some CGI--in the same dramatic situations posed in the original trilogy: whether it be the juxtaposition of primitives with technologically advanced societies or the timeless battle between good and evil, the very familiarity of these recurring scenarios and rhythms galvanises the viewer. Of course, the state-of-the-art visual effects contribute mightily to the final impact. Much has been written about the kinetic Pod Race sequence (compared favourably with the chariot race in Ben Hur) and the War and Peace-style military battles, but even these events are upstaged by the new planetary vistas: consider the Romanesque grandeur of Naboo, the underwater city of Otoh Gunga illuminated by Art Nouveau lamps, the decadent brio of Tatooine, or the dizzying skyscrapers of the city planet Coruscant (imagine Blade Runner in daylight). Despite the beauty of his iridescent images, Lucas exercises discipline, cutting fast within frames filled with rich detail and activity. As a result, The Phantom Menace lends itself to repeated viewings. On the DVD: This spectacular two-disc DVD set was certainly worth the wait. Simply put, this is the most comprehensive packaging of supplementary materials so far assembled for DVD. Most importantly, Lucas film offers an anamorphic, 2.35:1 film transfer and a highly active Dolby 5.1 audio mix. Disc 1 includes an insightful commentary with Lucas--his first for DVD--and other key personnel, making for a great tour. The bulk of extra treasures can be found on Disc 2, including seven deleted scenes completed just for this set that possess the same quality as the film; in fact, some moments (the "Air Bus Taxi" and "Pod Race Grid" sequences) are so good that Lucas reincorporated them into the film proper. Viewers can also enjoy no less than 12 Web documentaries, five informative featurettes, the popular John Williams music video "Duel of the Fates" and numerous galleries of stills, trailers and television spots. Better yet, Lucas premieres "The Beginning," a 66-minute documentary edited from hundreds of hours of behind-the-scenes footage. This is not your standard-issue studio documentary, instead "The Beginning" is an Oscar-worthy, cinema verityé-style exploration of the creative process behind every aspect of the film's production. One of the most memorable moments involves a late-day visit to the set by Steven Spielberg: watching Lucas and Spielberg behave like kids in a candy store is one more reminder why the Star Wars saga remains enduringly popular. --Kevin Mulhall

  • Doctor Who - The Movie [Blu-ray] Doctor Who - The Movie | Blu Ray | (19/09/2016) from £8.29  |  Saving you £11.70 (58.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Made to re-launch television's most famous time traveller, Doctor Who: The Movie is an expensive feature-length episode which attempts to continue the classic series and work as a stand-alone film. Transporting the remains of the Master, Sylvester McCoy's Seventh Doctor is diverted to San Francisco in 1999. Regenerating in the form of Paul McGann, the Doctor gains a new companion in heart surgeon Dr Grace Holloway (Daphne Ashbrook) and must stop the Master from destroying the world. All of which might have been fine, had not the most eccentrically British of programmes been almost entirely assimilated by the requirements of American network broadcasting. Matthew Jacobs' screenplay is literally nonsense, dependent on arbitrary, unexplained events while introducing numerous elements that contradict established Doctor Who mythology. The Tardis is re-imagined as a bizarre pre-Raphaelite/Gothic folly, while the Doctor, now half-human, becomes romantically involved with his lady companion. From the West Coast setting to metallic CGI morphing, from the look of Eric Roberts as the Master to a motorcycle/truck freeway chase, director Geoffrey Sax borrows freely from James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). Doctor Who fans should feel relieved this travesty was not successful enough to lead to lead to a series, though McGann himself does have the potential to make a fine Doctor. This is the slightly more violent US TV edit, rather than the cut version previously released on video. On the DVD: There are two BBC trailers and a Fox promo "introducing the Doctor" to American audiences. The interview section features Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann, Eric Roberts, Daphne Ashbrook, director Geoffrey Sax and executive producer Philip Segal, twice. The main interviews are on-set promotional sound-bites. However, Segal's second interview was filmed in 2001 and finds him spending 10 minutes explaining why the programme turned out as it did, and coming very close to apologising for it. He also offers a two-minute tour of the new Tardis set. Alongside a gallery of 50 promotional stills is a four-minute compilation of behind-the-scenes "making of" footage. There are alternative versions of two scenes, though the "Puccini!" scene is so short as to be pointless. As usual with Doctor Who DVDs there are optional production subtitles and these offer a wealth of background information. Four songs used in the film are available as separate audio tracks, and John Debney's musical score can be listened to in isolation. Finally there is a commentary track by Geoffrey Sax, which contains some interesting material but does tend to state the obvious a lot. The sound is very strong stereo and the 4:3 picture is excellent with only the slightest grain. --Gary S Dalkin

  • Galaxy Quest [2000] Galaxy Quest | DVD | (02/07/2006) from £5.59  |  Saving you £14.40 (72.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    You don't have to be a Star Trek fan to enjoy Galaxy Quest, but it certainly helps. A knowingly affectionate tribute to Trek and any other science fiction TV series of the 1960s and beyond, this crowd-pleasing comedy offers in-jokes at warp speed, hitting the bull's-eye for anyone who knows that: (1) the starship captain always removes his shirt to display his manly physique; (2) any crew member not in the regular cast is dead meat; and (3) the heroes always stop the doomsday clock with one second to spare. So it is with Commander Taggart (Tim Allen) and the stalwart crew of the NSEA Protector, whose intergalactic exploits on TV have now been reduced to a dreary cycle of fan conventions and promotional appearances. That's when the Thermians arrive, begging to be saved from Sarris, the reptilian villain who threatens to destroy their home planet.Can actors rise to the challenge and play their roles for real? The Thermians are counting on it, having studied the "historical documents" of the Galaxy Quest TV show, and their hero worship (not to mention their taste for Monte Cristo sandwiches) is ultimately proven worthy, with the help of some Galaxy geeks on planet Earth. And while Galaxy Quest serves up great special effects and impressive Stan Winston creatures, director Dean Parisot (Home Fries) is never condescending, lending warm acceptance to this gentle send-up of sci-fi TV and the phenomenon of fandom. Best of all is the splendid cast, including Sigourney Weaver as buxom blonde Gwen DeMarco; Alan Rickman as frustrated thespian Alexander Dane; Tony Shalhoub as dimwit Fred Kwan; Daryl Mitchell as former child-star Tommy Webber; and Enrico Colantoni as Thermian leader Mathesar, whose sing-song voice is a comedic coup de grâce. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • An Adventure in Space and Time [DVD] An Adventure in Space and Time | DVD | (02/12/2013) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    This fantastic one-off drama travels back in time to 1963 to see how the beloved Doctor Who was first brought to the screen. Actor William Hartnell felt trapped by a succession of hard-man roles. Wannabe producer Verity Lambert was frustrated by the TV industry's glass ceiling. Both of them were to find unlikely hope and unexpected challenges in the form of a Saturday tea-time drama time travel and monsters! Allied with a team of brilliant people they went on to create the longest-running science fiction series ever now celebrating its 50th anniversary. An Adventure in Space and Time is written by Mark Gatiss executive produced by Mark Gatiss Steven Moffat and Caroline Skinner and directed by Terry McDonough. David Bradley (Harry Potter Game of Thrones Broadchurch) plays the lead role of William Hartnell while Jessica Raine (Call the Midwife The Woman in Black) co-stars as the first ever producer of Doctor Who Verity Lambert. The stellar cast is joined by Sacha Dhawan (Waris Hussein) Lesley Manville (Heather Hartnell) and Brian Cox (Sydney Newman). A must see drama for all doctor who and drama fans alike. Special Features: Leaflet Featuring Programme Images and an Exclusive Foreword by Writer and Executive Producer Mark Gatiss William Hartnell: The Original The Making of An Adventure - Narrated by Carole Ann Ford Reconstructions: Scenes from An Unearthly Child and the Pilot Regenerations Farewell to Susan Festive Greeting The Title Sequences Deleted Scenes: The Radiophonic Workshop Verity's Leaving Party

  • Stargate (Director's Cut) Stargate (Director's Cut) | DVD | (15/10/2001) from £3.73  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A self-consciously epic sci-fi adventure of Cecil B DeMille-sized proportions, Stargate refreshes and combines several well-worn sci-fi and sword 'n' sandal genre conventions with some Erich von Daniken-style Biblical Egyptology. The directing-writing-producing team of Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin had previously collaborated on B-movies Moon 44 (1990) and Universal Soldier (1992), but handed a significantly bigger budget they were able to give their Steven Spielberg pretensions free reign here ("Indiana Jones and his Close Encounters with the Chariots of the Gods" might be a suitable subtitle). James Spader is endearingly dithery as the fish-out-of-water academic who finds himself teamed with taciturn tough guy Kurt Russell: the two excellent leads are largely responsible for imparting what depth there is to otherwise two-dimensional characters. British composer David Arnold makes his major studio debut in the grandest fashion with an outstanding score that pays suitable homage to epic film music (John Williams' CE3K and Maurice Jarre's Lawrence of Arabia in particular). It's all done with such unabashed enthusiasm that viewers will happily forgive the film's derivative elements and even overlook the high-camp theatricality of Jaye Davidson's bizarre bad guy. Despite subsequent huge box-office hits (Independence Day, Godzilla, The Patriot), Stargate remains Emmerich and Devlin's freshest, most satisfying film. On the DVD: This special edition version adds approximately seven minutes of additional footage, much of which is in the form of slightly extended scenes, but does also include an opening sequence in Ancient Egypt, a scene with Kurt Russell and the fossilised Horus guards, and Ra's bath scene. These are also collected in a bonus "Promo Reel". The anamorphic widescreen presentation of the 2.35:1 Panavision picture looks sharp and clear, although some of the additional footage is degraded; the sound is suitably spectacular 5.1 or DTS. Devlin and Emmerich provide a relaxed, chatty commentary ("We have nothing to do with the TV series"!), although you have to access this from the Set Up menu not the Special Features menu. There's a photo gallery and trailer, but sadly no "making-of" documentary. --Mark Walker

  • Doctor Who - Pyramids Of Mars [1975] Doctor Who - Pyramids Of Mars | DVD | (01/03/2004) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Returning to UNIT HQ on Earth the TARDIS is thrown violently about by a mysterious force and Sarah and the Doctor arrive instead at an old priory in the year 1911. The owner Marcus Scarman has been excavating ancient tombs and is possessed by the spirit of Sutekh bringer of 'the gift of death to all mankind'. Sutekh has lain for thousands of years in his pyramid prison and Scarman and his robot mummies plan to release this ancient and evil power. Will Sutekh the all-powerful b

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