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  • Life of Brian: Collector's Edition (Re-Package)  [DVD] [1979] Life of Brian: Collector's Edition (Re-Package) | DVD | (07/11/2016) from £5.09  |  Saving you £0.90 (15.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

    There is not a single joke, sight-gag or one-liner in Monty Python's Life of Brian that will not forever burn itself into the viewer's memory as being just as funny as it is possible to be, but--extraordinarily--almost every indestructibly hilarious scene also serves a dual purpose, making this one of the most consistently sustained film satires ever made. Like all great satire, the Pythons not only attack and vilify their targets (the bigotry and hypocrisy of organised religion and politics) supremely well, they also propose an alternative: be an individual, think for yourself, don't be led by others. "You've all got to work it out for yourselves", cries Brian in a key moment. "Yes, we've all got to work it our for ourselves", the crowd reply en masse. Two thousand years later, in a world still blighted by religious zealots, Brian's is still a lone voice crying in the wilderness. Aside from being a neat spoof on the Hollywood epic, it's also almost incidentally one of the most realistic on-screen depictions of the ancient world--instead of treating their characters as posturing historical stereotypes, the Pythons realised what no sword 'n' sandal epic ever has: that people are all the same, no matter what period of history they live in. People always have and always will bicker, lie, cheat, swear, conceal cowardice with bravado (like Reg, leader of the People's Front of Judea), abuse power (like Pontius Pilate), blindly follow the latest fads and giggle at silly things ("Biggus Dickus"). In the end, Life of Brian teaches us that the only way for a despairing individual to cope in a world of idiocy and hypocrisy is to always look on the bright side of life. On the DVD: Life of Brian returns to Region 2 DVD in a decent widescreen anamorphic print with Dolby 5.1 sound--neither are exactly revelatory, but at least it's an improvement on the previous release, which was, shockingly, pan & scan. The 50-minute BBC documentary, "The Pythons", was filmed mainly on location in 1979 and isn't especially remarkable or insightful (a new retrospective would have been appreciated). There are trailers for this movie, as well as Holy Grail plus three other non-Python movies. There's no commentary track, sadly. --Mark Walker

  • Electra Glide In Blue [DVD] Electra Glide In Blue | DVD | (22/09/2014) from £5.69  |  Saving you £4.30 (43.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A pint-sized police officer who would rather use his brains than his gun is put into a situation where neither can help him in this police drama. John Wintergreen (Robert Blake) is a street-smart Arizona motorcycle cop who dreams of climbing the ladder and becoming a police detective, but his ambitions are scoffed at by his partner, Zipper (Billy 'Green' Bush). Wintergreen's superiors also tend not to take him seriously due to his short stature, but when he stumbles upon the scene of a murder, he digs up enough relevant evidence to ensure his advancement to detective status. However, Wintergreen soon realizes just how corrupt his superior Poole (Mitchell Ryan) truly is, after Poole attempts to frame a local hippie, Bob Zemko (Peter Cetera), for a crime he didn't commit. Adding fuel to the fire is Poole's discovery that he and Wintergreen have both been dating the same woman, dancer-turned-barmaid Jolene (Jeannine Riley) Electra Glide In Blue was the first (and, to date, only) directorial credit for James William Guercio. Successful in the music industry as a manager and producer, Guercio was best known for his association with the top-selling jazz-rock group Chicago: several members of the band appear in the movie, as does a young Nick Nolte in a bit part. On a note of sad irony, Terry Kath, the longtime Chicago vocalist who died in 1978 from a self-inflicted gunshot to the head, plays a gun-wielding killer in this film.

  • Woman Of The Dunes [1964] Woman Of The Dunes | DVD | (31/07/2006) from £5.58  |  Saving you £13.18 (65.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Hiroshi Teshigahara's powerful masterpiece based on the novel by Kobo Abe follows an amateur biologist who escapes the bustle of the city by studying beetles in remote sand dunes. After missing the last bus he accepts a villager's offer to spend the night in a widow's shack at the bottom of a deep sand pit. In the morning he finds he is trapped. At first enraged the man's hatred for the woman soon turns to searing erotic lust.

  • How Green Was My Valley [1941] How Green Was My Valley | DVD | (18/02/2002) from £9.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Escape to Victory Escape to Victory | DVD | (23/10/2006) from £9.25  |  Saving you £2.50 (17.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    A group of P.O.W.s at a German prison camp agree to compete against Nazi soccer players in this World War II drama set in 1943 Occupied Europe. German Major Karl von Steiner, who played soccer professionally before the war, comes up with the idea. When his superior officers find out about the competition, they pit the Allies against Germany's best team--but they don't realize that the P.O.W.s plan to use the upcoming big game as a means of escaping. The Allied team includes John Colby, a British officer who also played soccer before the war, and Robert Hatch, an American soldier who cares far more about gaining his freedom than the game itself. When the P.O.W.s realize they have a good shot at beating the Nazi team in front of a huge crowd, they must decide what's more important: finishing the match or getting out alive.

  • The Goose Steps Out - 75th Anniversary (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1942] The Goose Steps Out - 75th Anniversary (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (15/05/2017) from £8.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Comedy legend Will Hay stars as William Potts, a hapless, clumsy schoolteacher, who just happens to be an identical body double for a notorious German Nazi general. When the army is made aware of this uncanny resemblance to the German, who they are currently holding prisoner; they decide to drop the reluctant Mr Potts behind enemy lines. His deadly mission is to find and retrieve information on a secret weapon that the Germans are planning to use. But whilst impersonating the Nazi general, William Potts manages to infiltrate the college of Hitler Youth. He also manages to make a big impression on the students who are being trained as spies and are learning how to fit into British society. Luckily Mr Potts is at hand to give them lots of handy hints in honour of the war effort! Extras: Interview with Graham Rinaldi Go to Blazes Will Hay short BBC Radio 3 The Essay: British Film Comedians Will Hay Audio Featurette by Simon Heffer

  • Went The Day Well? [1942] Went The Day Well? | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £7.07  |  Saving you £5.92 (45.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    On the Whitsun weekend of 1942 in the idyllic village of Bramley End German paratroopers disguised as sappers attempt to set up equipment to disrupt Britain's radar defences yet haven't counted on the indomitable spirit of the English villagers! Directed by the Italian director Alberto Cavalcanti and produced by Ealing Studios Went The Day Well? was a commercial feature based loosely upon Graham Greene's fictional short story 'The Lieutenant Died Last'.

  • Rear Window [1954] Rear Window | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £5.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    None of Hitchcock's films has ever given a clearer view of his genius for suspense than Rear Window. When professional photographer J.B. ""Jeff"" Jeffries (James Stewart) is confined to a wheelchair with a broken leg he becomes obsessed with watching the private dramas of his neighbours play out across the courtyard. When he suspects a salesman may have murdered his nagging wife Jeffries enlists the help of his glamorous socialite girlfriend (Grace Kelly) to investigate the highly suspicious chain of events... Events that ultimately lead to one of the most memorable and gripping endings in all of film history.

  • Shakespeare Wallah [1965] Shakespeare Wallah | DVD | (28/04/2003) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Elegiac and atmospheric Shakespeare Wallah made in 1965 was the feature film that really put Merchant Ivory Productions on the international movie map winning them great critical acclaim. It is now recognised as a classic.Starring a young FELICITY KENDAL SHASHI KAPOOR and MADHUR JAFFREY the film's inspiration lies behind the real-life adventures of Felicity Kendal's family as a travelling theatre troupe in India during the twilight days of English colonial rule. Essentially a culture-clash romance which blends Shakespeare and British tradition with the emerging Indian 'pop' culture the film traces the developing relationship between Lizzie one of the members of the acting troupe with Sanju a wealthy Indian playboy. But their romance is beset by hindrances not the least being the machinations of Manjula a fiery Indian cinema star who is also in love with Sanju.

  • Pillow Talk/Lover Come Back/It Happened To Jane [1959] Pillow Talk/Lover Come Back/It Happened To Jane | DVD | (21/01/2008) from £5.39  |  Saving you £9.60 (64.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Pillow Talk: Day is an uptight interior decorator forced to share a party line with an amorous playboy who ties up the line with his exploits while she is trying to conduct business. When the two accidentally meet he's taken with her beauty and pretending to be a wealthy Texan begins to court her mercilessly. Though flattered by this stranger's attention it's not long before she discovers his true identity. Now it's her turn to have a little fun...at his expense! Lover Come back: Jerry Webster (Hudson) and Carol Templeton (Day) are rival Madison Avenue advertising executives who each dislike each other's methods. After he steals a client out from under her cute little nose revenge prompts her to infiltrate his secret VIP campaign in order to persuade the mystery product's scientist to switch to her firm. Trouble is the product is phony and the scientist is Jerry who uses all his intelligence and charm to steal her heart! It Happened To Jane: Jane Osgood (Day) is a widowed mother who runs a struggling lobster business in coastal Maine while Harry Malone (Kovacs) is a wealthy businessman who has bought out the local railroad. He harbors big plans for it aiming to transform it into a luxury passenger train replacing the freight train the residents of the area depend upon. When a large lobster shipment of Jane's is rerouted and returned to her dead she decides to fight back and sues Malone with the help of her longtime friend and lawyer George Denham. This instigates a battle of increasingly epic proportions as Malone uses every trick in the book--as well as his massive bank account--to quell the resolve of the spitfire businesswoman; Jane for her part has public sympathy on her side. A reporter for the national news doing a story on Jane (Steve Forrest) begins to fall in love with her and she is forced to decide between the romantic journalist and her childhood friend George. The magical pairing of Lemmon and Day is augmented by the beautiful location photography in Maine and a stellar supporting cast including Mary Wickes Russ Brown and a rare film appearance from Kovacs.

  • The Best Of Ealing Collection [DVD] The Best Of Ealing Collection | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £14.50  |  Saving you £18.00 (51.40%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Titles Comprise: Kind Hearts And Coronets: Set in the stately Edwardian era Kind Hearts And Coronets is black comedy at is best with the most articulate and literate of all Ealing screenplays. Sir Alec Guinness gives a virtuoso performance in his Ealing comedy debut playing all eight victims standing between a mass-murderer and his family fortune. Considered by some to be Ealing's most perfect achievement of all the Ealing films. The Ladykillers director Alexander Mackendrick's third Ealing farce is the final comedy produced by the famous British studio and one of its most celebrated. Like the equally applauded Kind Hearts And Coronets the film is more sophisticated and blacker in tone than typically lighthearted Ealing fare (such as Mackendrick's Whiskey Galore!). Alec Guinness stars as the superbly shifty toothily threatening Professor Marcus the leader of a crime ring planning a heist. Marcus rents rooms from a sweet eccentric old lady Mrs. Wilberforce (Katie Johnson) in her crooked London house. The professor and his co-conspirators blowhard Major Courtney (Cecil Parker) creepily suave Louis (Herbert Lom) chubby Harry (Peter Sellers) and muscleman One-Round (Danny Green) pose as an unlikely string quartet using the rooms for rehearsal. Dodging Mrs. Wilberforce's constant interruptions the hoods hit upon the idea to use her in the daring daylight robbery (filmed in and around London's King's Cross station). When the old girl discovers the truth Marcus and company cannot persuade her to stay buttoned up about it and thus decide to do her in. Accompanied by a noirish cacophony of screeching trains parrots and little old ladies at afternoon tea a series of unlikely events builds to the hilarious surprising finale. The Man In The White Suit: Sidney Stratton (Alec Guinness) works quietly at Michael Corland's (Michael Gough) textile mill until his mysterious costly lab experiment is discovered. Fired by Corland Stratton takes a menial job at Alan Birnley's (Cecil Parker) mill in order to continue his work on the sly. When Daphne (Joan Greenwood) Corland's fianc''e and Birnley's daughter discovers his secret she threatens to expose Stratton. The desperate scientist reveals to Daphne that he has invented an indestructible cloth that never gets dirty. Close to realizing his vision Stratton celebrates by having a white suit made of the fabric (because it repels dye). The trouble however is just beginning. The lowly mill workers (who spout market economics in rough accents) fear for their jobs while the mill owners led by the decrepit Godfather-esque Sir John Kierlaw (Ernest Thesiger) worry about their profits. Passport To Pimlico: An archaic document found in a bombsite reveals that the London district of Pimlico has for centuries technically been part of France. The local residents embrace their new found continental status seeing it as a way to avoid the drabness austerity and rationing of post-war England. The authorities do not however share their enthusiasm... The Lavender Hill Mob: Mr. Holland (Alec Guinness) has supervised the bank's bullion run for years. He is fussy and unnecessarily overprotective but everyone knows he is absolutely trustworthy. And so on the day the bullion truck is robbed he is the last person to be suspected. But there is another side to Mr. Holland; he is also Dutch the leader of the Lavender Hill Mob.

  • Holiday Inn [DVD] [1942] Holiday Inn | DVD | (01/12/2003) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Holiday Inn is the perennial Christmas-season favourite from 1942 that teams Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire as entertainers (and rival suitors of Marjorie Reynolds) running an inn that is only open on holidays. It's a great excuse for lots of singing and dancing, seamlessly wrapped in a catchy story, and Astaire's frequent director Mark Sandrich (Top Hat, Shall We Dance) doesn't let us down. The Irving Berlin numbers (each one connected to a different holiday) are winners, with Crosby's warm performance of "White Christmas" a movie touchstone. --Tom Keogh

  • The Ladykillers [1955] The Ladykillers | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £8.84  |  Saving you £4.15 (31.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The Ladykillers director Alexander Mackendrick's third Ealing farce is the final comedy produced by the famous British studio and one of its most celebrated. Like the equally applauded Kind Hearts And Coronets the film is more sophisticated and blacker in tone than typically lighthearted Ealing fare (such as Mackendrick's Whiskey Galore!). Alec Guinness stars as the superbly shifty toothily threatening Professor Marcus the leader of a crime ring planning a he

  • Poor Cow [DVD] [1967] Poor Cow | DVD | (25/07/2016) from £8.48  |  Saving you £9.51 (52.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

    "I fell in the family way when I was 18 and I got married to a right bastard". Ken Loach's debut feature tells the story of Joy, a young mother (Carol White) whose chauvinistic thug of a husband is thrown into prison. She takes up with one of his friends, lovable, kind-hearted burglar Terence Stamp, but he too ends up in jail.It's intriguing to compare Poor Cow with Cathy Come Home, which Loach made for TV with the same actress at around the same time. Both are about mums trying to make a go of their lives in adverse circumstances. Cathy Come Home, shot in black and white, is an altogether tougher film. Poor Cow, with its Donovan music, gaudy colour photography, star names, and incongruously bawdy humour, seems lightweight by comparison. Certain sequences--Joy making love in the hay or posing half-naked for lecherous amateur photographers--must surely make Loach grimace now. There are some powerful moments--Joy desperately looking for her son who has wandered off, unattended, onto a building site, or trying to escape from her abusive husband--which anticipate such later Loach films as Ladybird, Ladybird or Raining Stones. The scenes between Joy and Stamp are played with real tenderness and humour. Don't be surprised if you think you've seen them before--some of the footage of Stamp was used in Steven Soderbergh's recent thriller, The Limey. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • Bing Crosby Collection - Going My Way / The Bells Of St. Mary's Bing Crosby Collection - Going My Way / The Bells Of St. Mary's | DVD | (08/05/2006) from £39.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The Bells Of St. Mary's (Dir. Leo McCarey 1945): This Going My Way sequel stars Bing Crosby reprising his role as worldly-wise Father Chuck O'Malley and introduces Crosby's beloved song Aren't You Glad You're You? Father O'Malley is transferred to the soon-to-be-condemned school run by Sister Benedict (Ingrid Bergman) and the two quickly match wits and stubbornness eventually finding a middle ground. A surprisingly light touch of sentimentality and humor gives this film by director Leo McCarey a glow of genuine feeling that effortlessly captures viewers' hearts. Going My Way (Dir. Leo McCarey 1944): Youthful Father Chuck O'Malley (Bing Crosby) led a colorful life of sports song and romance before joining the Roman Catholic clergy but his level gaze and twinkling eyes make it clear that he knows he made the right choice. After joining a parish O'Malley's worldly knowledge helps him connect with a gang of kids looking for direction and handle the business details of the church-building fund winning over his aging conventional superior (Barry Fitzgerald). Songs such as Swinging on a Star sparkle and both Crosby and Fitzgerald do a fine job tugging at the heartstrings in a gentle irresistible way that will make viewers return to this lovely film again and again.

  • The Odd Couple [1967] The Odd Couple | DVD | (02/09/2002) from £5.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (53.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Neil Simon's classic stage comedy made an effortless transition to the big screen in 1967, when The Odd Couple provided Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau with a tailor-made mid-career affirmation of their status as two of cinema's greatest funny men. Lemmon is Felix, manically obsessed with cleanliness and housekeeping, struggling to understand why his wife wants a divorce. Matthau is Oscar, his slovenly poker-playing buddy who invites him to take the spare room and lives to regret it as they rapidly and comically come to grief like an old, totally incompatible, married couple, revealing exactly why their respective wives have had enough. "I don't think two single men living alone in a big eight-room apartment should have a cleaner house than my mother", Matthau wails, trying to make sense of the disintegrating situation. The pair devour Simon's typically sharp and witty script in a frenzy of classic one-liners that allow Lemmon's trademark twitchy neurosis and Matthau's baleful cussedness to flourish. Great as they are, though, they are nearly eclipsed in the funniest scene of the film by Monica Evans and Carole Shelly as a couple of British expatriate sisters from the apartment upstairs. Carry On innuendo briefly meets Manhattan repartee and the screen crackles with brilliance. It's a comic masterclass. On the DVD: The Odd Couple on disc has no extras apart from the original cinema trailer, but the film, presented in 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen, with Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, is pristine, Neal Hefti's score providing that instantly identifiable flavour of sophisticated 1960s American comedy. --Piers Ford

  • South Pacific [1958] South Pacific | DVD | (08/03/2004) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The dazzling Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, brought to lush life by the director of the original stage version, Joshua Logan. Set on a remote island during the Second World War, South Pacific tracks two parallel romances: one between a Navy nurse (Mitzi Gaynor) "as corny as Kansas in August" and a wealthy French plantation owner (Rossano Brazzi), the other between a young American officer (John Kerr) and a native girl (France Nuyen). The theme of interracial love was still daring in 1958, and so was director Logan's decision to overlay emotional moments with tinted filters--a technique that misfires as often as it hits. The comic relief tends to fall flat and an overly spunky Mitzi Gaynor is a poor substitute for the stage original's Mary Martin. But the location scenery on the Hawaiian island of Kauai is gorgeous and the songs are among the finest in the American musical catalogue: "Some Enchanted Evening", "Younger than Springtime", "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair", "This Nearly Was Mine". That's Juanita Hall as the sly native trader Bloody Mary, singing the haunting tune that launched a thousand tiki bars, "Bali H'ai". The movie is based on stories from James Michener's book Tales from the South Pacific. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com

  • Greyfriars Bobby [1960] Greyfriars Bobby | DVD | (03/07/2006) from £4.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (66.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Overflowing with warmth and charm Greyfriars Bobby celebrates the powerful bond between man and a kind and loving animal. Based on Eleanor Atkinson's immortal children's book - Walt Disney presents the remarkable true story of one of Scotland's most beloved and celebrated heroes - a terrier named Bobby. The enduring friendship forged between a tenderhearted shepherd known simply as Old Jock and his devoted dog cannot be broken - even by the kindly old man's death. Set in bustling Victorian Edinburgh and the breathtaking Scottish countryside Greyfriars Bobby is a sensitive tale of uncommon loyalty and affection that is certain to delight and inspire one and all!

  • Love is a Many-Splendored Thing [DVD] [1955] Love is a Many-Splendored Thing | DVD | (12/03/2012) from £6.79  |  Saving you £3.20 (32.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A widowed doctor of both Chinese and European descent falls in love with a married American correspondent in Hong Kong during China's Communist revolution.

  • Titanic [DVD] [1953] Titanic | DVD | (12/03/2012) from £3.99  |  Saving you £6.00 (60.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Determined to remove her family from the superficial, high society world in which her husband Richard (Clifton Webb) is engrossed, Julia Sturges (Barbara Stanwyck) boards the R.M.S. Titanic in England on its maiden voyage to America, along with her two children. Learning of her plans, however, Richard purchases a steerage ticket aboard the ship in hopes of reconciling with his family. But when fate, ice and an overzealous ship captain step in, the Sturges family faces an unimaginable challenge - the possibility of separation from one another forever. This classic, based on the true-life history of the famed ocean liner, remains one of the most poignant, well-crafted films of all time.Winner of the 1953 Oscar for Best Screenplay.

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