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  • Taxi Driver: Anniversary Edition  [Blu-ray] [1976] [Region A & B & C] Taxi Driver: Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (07/11/2016) from £11.00  |  Saving you £4.99 (31.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Taxi Driver is the definitive cinematic portrait of loneliness and alienation manifested as violence. It is as if director Martin Scorsese and screenwriter Paul Schrader had tapped into precisely the same source of psychological inspiration ("I just knew I had to make this film", Scorsese would later say), combined with a perfectly timed post-Watergate expression of personal, political and societal anxiety. Robert De Niro, as the tortured, ex-Marine cab driver Travis Bickle, made movie history with his chilling performance as one of the most memorably intense and vividly realised characters ever committed to film. Bickle is a self-appointed vigilante who views his urban beat as an intolerable cesspool of blighted humanity. He plays guardian angel for a young prostitute (Jodie Foster), but not without violently devastating consequences. This masterpiece, which is not for all tastes, is sure to horrify some viewers, but few could deny the film's lasting power and importance. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Graham Greene Collection [DVD] The Graham Greene Collection | DVD | (05/09/2016) from £19.25  |  Saving you £10.50 (35.00%)  |  RRP £29.99

  • The Lost Weekend [Masters of Cinema] (Blu-ray) The Lost Weekend (Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (25/06/2012) from £10.29  |  Saving you £9.70 (48.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    "I'm not a drinker--I'm a drunk." These words, and the serious message behind them, were still potent enough in 1945 to shock audiences flocking to The Lost Weekend. The speaker is Don Birnam (Ray Milland), a handsome, talented, articulate alcoholic. The writing team of producer Charles Brackett and director Billy Wilder pull no punches in their depiction of Birnam's massive weekend bender, a tailspin that finds him reeling from his favorite watering hole to Bellevue Hospital. Location shooting in New York helps the street-level atmosphere, especially a sequence in which Birnam, a budding writer, tries to hock his typewriter for booze money. He desperately staggers past shuttered storefronts--it's Yom Kippur, and the pawnshops are closed. Milland, previously known as a lightweight leading man (he'd starred in Wilder's hilarious The Major and the Minor three years earlier), burrows convincingly under the skin of the character, whether waxing poetic about the escape of drinking or screaming his lungs out in the D.T.'s sequence. Wilder, having just made the ultra-noir Double Indemnity, brought a new kind of frankness and darkness to Hollywood's treatment of a social problem. At first the film may have seemed too bold; Paramount Pictures nearly killed the release of the picture after it tested poorly with preview audiences. But once in release, The Lost Weekend became a substantial hit, and won four Oscars: for picture, director, screenplay, and actor. --Robert Horton

  • The Stranger (Dual Format - Blu-ray & DVD) The Stranger (Dual Format - Blu-ray & DVD) | Blu Ray | (04/05/2015) from £12.57  |  Saving you £7.00 (31.80%)  |  RRP £21.99

    In a way, Scarlet Street is a remake. It's taken from a French novel, La Chienne (literally, "The Bitch") that was first filmed by Jean Renoir in 1931. Renoir brought to the sordid tale all the colour and vitality of Montmartre; Fritz Lang's version shows us a far harsher and bleaker world. The film replays the triangle set-up from Lang's previous picture, The Woman in the Window, with the same three actors. Once again, Edward G Robinson plays a respectable middle-aged citizen snared by the charms of Joan Bennett's streetwalker, with Dan Duryea as her low-life pimp. The plot closes around the three of them like a steel trap. This is Lang at his most dispassionate. Scarlet Street is a tour de force of noir filmmaking, brilliant but ice-cold. The Stranger, according to Orson Welles, "is the worst of my films. There is nothing of me in that picture". But even on autopilot Welles still leaves most filmmakers standing. A war crimes investigator, played by Edward G Robinson, tracks down a senior Nazi to a sleepy New England town where he's living in concealment as a respected college professor. Welles wanted Agnes Moorehead as the investigator and Robinson as the Nazi Franz Kindler, but his producer, Sam Spiegel, wouldn't wear it. So Welles himself plays the supposedly cautious and self-effacing fugitive--and if there was one thing Welles could never play, it was unobtrusive. Still, the film's far from a write-off. Welles' eye for stunning visuals rarely deserted him and, aided by Russell Metty's skewed, shadowy photography, The Stranger builds to a doomy grand guignol climax in a clocktower that Hitchcock must surely have recalled when he made Vertigo. And Robinson, dogged in pursuit, is as quietly excellent as ever. On the DVD: sparse pickings. Both films have a full-length commentary by Russell Cawthorne which adds the occasional insight, but is repetitive and not always reliable. The box claims both print have been "fully restored and digitally remastered", but you'd never guess. --Philip Kemp

  • Lifeboat [Masters of Cinema] (Dual Format) [Blu-ray] Lifeboat (Dual Format) | Blu Ray | (23/04/2012) from £10.29  |  Saving you £9.70 (48.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Based on an unpublished novella by John Steinbeck (written on commission expressly to provide treatment material for Hitchcock's screen scenario), Lifeboat found the Master of Suspense navigating a course of maximal tension - in the most minimal of settings - with a consistently inventive, beautifully paced drama that would foreshadow the single-set experiments of Rope and Dial M for Murder. After a Nazi torpedo reduces an ocean liner to wooden splinters and scorched personal effects, the survivors of the attack pull themselves aboard a drifting lifeboat in the hope of eventual rescue. But the motivations of the German submarine captain (played by Walter Slezak) on the eponymous craft might extend beyond mere survival... With a cast including Shadow of a Doubt veteran Hume Cronyn and the extraordinary, irrepressible Tallulah Bankhead, this picture of characters, as Franois Truffaut aptly termed the film, oscillates dazzlingly between comic reparte and white-knuckle suspense - a perfect example of the Hitchcock touch.

  • Quatermass [DVD] [1979] Quatermass | DVD | (27/07/2015) from £10.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (45.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    John Mills brings a stoic intensity to the role of Professor Bernard Quatermass in this key piece of British dystopian fiction from visionary writer Nigel Kneale. Unsettling in its vision of a crumbling society coming under alien attack, Quatermass is directed with characteristic style by BAFTA winner Piers Haggard and features the high production values associated with Euston Films. Shot on 35mm, the original negatives have been used for this stunning, brand-new restoration a new 5.1 mix from original triple-track audio elements is also presented here alongside the original mono soundtrack.Bernard Quatermass, former head of the British Rocket Group, lives in seclusion in western Scotland, watching in appalled silence as Britain slowly turns into a vision of violence, gang rule and governmental collapse. A desperate search for his missing granddaughter plunges him into a terrifying situation when he comes to realise that the mass disappearance of thousands of youths is nothing less than the culling of the human species by an unknown alien intelligence...Special Features:Brand-new 5.1 mix for episodic versionBrand-new HD restoration of The Quatermass Conclusion in its original theatrical aspect ratioMusic-only tracks for all four episodesEpisode recapsTextless titlesImage GalleryBooklet by archive TV historian Andrew Pixley

  • James Cagney - The Signature Collection Volume 2 : West Point Story / Torrid Zone / The Fighting 69th / The Bride Came C.O.D. James Cagney - The Signature Collection Volume 2 : West Point Story / Torrid Zone / The Fighting 69th / The Bride Came C.O.D. | DVD | (10/12/2007) from £15.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (48.40%)  |  RRP £30.99

    The Oscar winning screen icon, James Cagney, comes to life in this DVD collection The Bride Came C.O.D., The Fighting 69th, Torrid Zone and The West Point Story. Special features on each title in the Collection include the entertaining Warner Night at the Movies short subject galleries with vintage newsreels, vault treasures and classic cartoons. The Bride Came C.O.D. Comedy comes from numerous sources in this screwball farce headlined by the ebullient pairing of James Cagney and Bette Davis, scripted by Julius J. and Philip G. Epstein (Casablanca, Arsenic and Old Lace). Whether up in the clouds, or underground in a mine, the stars (in their second and final film together) spar with harebrained zest as a pilot hired to kidnap an about-to-elope heiress, and the happy result from start to end is C.O.D. Comedy on Demand. The Fighting 69th In the seventh of their nine movies together, off-screen pals James Cagney and Pat O'Brien play soldiers of the famed, largely Irish-American World War I regiment, the Fighting 69th. O'Brien is Father Duffy, the brave chaplain whose statue stands today in Manhattan's Times Square. Cagney is Jerry Plunkett, a street-tough braggart turned yellow by the horror of No Man's Land, but inspired to redemptive heroism by Duffy's courage under fire. The Torrid Zone Off-screen pals James Cagney and Pat O'Brien team for the eighth time in this snappy action comedy set in a Central American Banana Republic. In a role widely cited as putting her on the movie fan's map, Hollywood's Oomph Girl Ann Sheridan portrays wisecracking chanteuse Lee Donley who's the lure to keep the plantation's best man (Cagney) from leaving the company. With superb support, zippy repartee, plus 950 banana trees planted over 5 backlot acres, the heat is on. The West Point Story James Cagney puts on his dancing shoes again for this merry musical comedy packed with spirited starpower and lively tunes by Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn.

  • Don't Look Back [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [1967] Don't Look Back | Blu Ray | (17/10/2016) from £17.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (35.70%)  |  RRP £27.99

    BOB DYLAN is captured on-screen as he never would be again in this ground-breaking film from D. A. PENNEBAKER (Monterey Pop, Company). The legendary documentarian finds Dylan in London during his 1965 tour, which would be his last as an acoustic artist and marked a turning point in his career. In this wildly entertaining vision of one of the twentieth century's greatest artists thrust into the spotlight, Dylan is surrounded by teen fans; gets into heated philosophical jousts with journalists; and kicks back with fellow musicians Joan Baez, Donovan, and Alan Price. Featuring some of Dylan's most famous songs, including Subterranean Homesick Blues, The Times They Are A-Changin', and It's All Over Now, Baby Blue, Don't Look Back is a radically conceived and shot portrait of an American icon that has influenced decades of vérité behind-the-scenes documentaries SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES New, restored 4K digital transfer, approved by director D. A. Pennebaker, with newly restored monaural sound from the original quarter-inch magnetic masters, presented uncompressed on the Blu-ray Audio commentary from 1999 featuring Pennebaker and tour manager Bob Neuwirth 65 Revisited, a 2006 documentary directed by Pennebaker and edited by Walker Lamond Audio excerpt from an interview with Bob Dylan in the 2005 documentary No Direction Home, cut to previously unseen outtakes from Don't Look Back New documentary about the evolution of Pennebaker's filming style, from his 1950s avant-garde work to his '60s musical documentaries, including an excerpt from the filmmaker's footage of Dylan performing Ballad of a Thin Man during his 1966 electric tour Daybreak Express (1953), Baby (1954), and Lambert & Co. (1964), three short films by Pennebaker New conversation between Pennebaker and Neuwirth about their work together, from Don't Look Back through Monterey Pop (1967) and beyond Snapshots from the Tour, a new piece featuring outtakes from Don't Look Back New interview with musician Patti Smith about Dylan and the influence of Don't Look Back in her life Conversation between music critic Greil Marcus and Pennebaker from 2010 Alternate version of the film's Subterranean Homesick Blues cue card sequence Five uncut audio tracks of Dylan songs from the film Trailer PLUS: An essay by critic and poet Robert Polito Click Images to Enlarge

  • I've Gotta Horse [DVD] [1966] I've Gotta Horse | DVD | (08/06/2015) from £11.48  |  Saving you £6.51 (36.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    1966’s I’VE GOTTA HORSE was Liverpool pop sensation; BILLY FURY’S first hit feature film. This musical comedy centers on the star’s famous love of animals. A thoroughbred racehorse horse named Armitage contracts pneumonia after Billy smuggles it backstage. Havoc ensues as Billy has to choose between his love of the horse and the big show. Songs include “I’ve Gotta Horse” “Stand By Me” Find Your Dream” and “Tell Me Why”.

  • Films That Define A Decade: '70s [DVD] Films That Define A Decade: '70s | DVD | (22/08/2016) from £10.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (45.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    They say the ?60s really happened in the ?70s. Bell-bottoms and disco took over, while films from the ?70s captured the free-spirited movement of the decade in many ways. There was the LA disaster epic Earthquake; pushing all boundaries came the cult classic National Lampoon's Animal House; there was the rip-roaring road trip Smokey and the Bandit; and crime caper The Sting starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

  • Speedy [Blu-ray] [1928] [Region Free] Speedy | Blu Ray | (18/04/2016) from £15.29  |  Saving you £12.70 (45.40%)  |  RRP £27.99

    Speedy was the last silent feature to star Harold Lloyd and one of his very best. The slapstick legend reprises his Glasses Character, this time as a good-natured but scatter-brained New Yorker who can't keep a job. He finally finds his true calling when he becomes determined to help save the city's last horse-drawn streetcar, which is operated by his sweetheart's crusty grandfather. From its joyous visit to Coney Island to its incredible Babe Ruth cameo to its hair-raising climatic stunts on the city's streets, Speedy is an out-of-control love letter to New York that will have you grinning from ear to ear.

  • His Girl Friday [The Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [1941] His Girl Friday | Blu Ray | (16/01/2017) from £17.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Winner of both the Academy Award for best foreign-language film and the Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or, MARCEL CAMUS' Black Orpheus (Orfeu negro) brings the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice to the twentieth-century madness of Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. With its eye-popping photography and ravishing, epochal soundtrack, Black Orpheus was a cultural event, kicking off the bossa nova craze that set hi-fis across America spinning. SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES: New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack Optional English-dubbed soundtrack Archival interviews with director Marcel Camus and actress Marpessa Dawn New video interviews with Brazilian cinema scholar Robert Stam, jazz historian Gary Giddins, and Brazilian author Ruy Castro Looking for Black Orpheus, a French documentary about Black Orpheus's cultural and musical roots and its resonance in Brazil today Theatrical trailer PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film critic Michael Atkinson Click Images to Enlarge

  • THE COMPLETE (EXISTING) FILMS OF SADAO YAMANAKA (Masters of Cinema) (DVD) THE COMPLETE (EXISTING) FILMS OF SADAO YAMANAKA (Masters of Cinema) (DVD) | DVD | (20/05/2013) from £10.98  |  Saving you £14.01 (56.10%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The brief but prodigious career of Japanese director Sadao Yamanaka resulted in a catalogue of work characterised by an elegant and unforced visual style, fluid editing, and a beautiful attention to naturalistic performances. Although he made 22 films over a six-year period (before dying of dysentery in a Japanese Imperial Army outpost in Manchuria at the age of 28), only three of them survive, collected here for the first time in the West. Tange Sazen: The Million Ry Pot is a gloriously comic adventure yarn as the titular one-eyed, one-armed swordsman becomes embroiled in the hunt for a missing pot that points the way to hidden treasure. In Kchiyama Sshun, a subversively humanistic adaptation of a classic kabuki play, a small but invaluable knife stolen from a samurai leads to a chain of an increasingly complex and troublesome set of circumstances. His last film, Humanity and Paper Balloons, is an unsparing ensemble drama set among the lowest rungs of Japanese society in the 18th century. The Masters of Cinema Series is delighted to present these treasures of world cinema in a long-awaited two-disc DVD set, including rarely-seen fragments of two other lost Yamanaka films. Special Features: New digital transfer of all three films New English subtitle translations Rare fragments of other lost Yamanaka films A lengthy booklet, including Yamanaka's will, excerpts from his diaries, essays by Tony Rayns, Shinji Aoyama, Kimitoshi Sat, and more.

  • It Happened One Night [Blu-ray] [1934] [Region Free] It Happened One Night | Blu Ray | (18/04/2016) from £15.29  |  Saving you £12.70 (45.40%)  |  RRP £27.99

    Director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington) took home every Oscar in the book (well, okay, all the major ones) for this seminal 1934 comedy starring Clark Gable as a hard-bitten reporter who stays close to a runaway heiress (Claudette Colbert) so not to lose a good story. Funny and sexy, the film is full of memorable scenes often referred to in other films, such as the "Wall of Jericho" (a mere bedcover hung on a clothesline down the middle of the room), and Colbert's famous flash of thigh to stop a speeding car in its tracks. Capra's brisk, urbane brand of wit was a perfect complement to his populist faith in the common man (in this case, Gable's character), and this inspiration makes this film a spirited entertainment and an uplifting experience. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Films That Define A Decade: '60s [DVD] Films That Define A Decade: '60s | DVD | (22/08/2016) from £10.75  |  Saving you £-0.75 (-7.50%)  |  RRP £10

    There has never been a decade quite like the ?60s! An era of change, conflict and hope, it will be fondly remembered for its revolutionary thinking, the fight for freedom of expression and its definitive slogan to ?Make Love Not War'. Here we celebrate the ?60s by bringing together four of the greatest films of the decade; Alfred Hitchcock's iconic thriller The Birds; the historic epic Spartacus; literary classic To Kill a Mockingbird; and timeless Western The War Wagon starring the legendary John Wayne.

  • Le Mepris [DVD] [1963] Le Mepris | DVD | (05/04/2010) from £10.89  |  Saving you £5.10 (31.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Starring Brigitte Bardot, then at the height of her fame, and Michel Piccoli as a married couple tearing the last strips off a failing marriage, Le Mépris is both one of Jean-Luc Godard's most accessible films and perhaps his most excoriating and emotionally raw. Godard and his regular cinematographer Raoul Coutard (lensman for most of the greatest films of the New Wave) splashed out the budget for this international co-production on Bardot's salary and gorgeous CinemaScope photography to capture the Italian setting's intense beauty, bright as a knife. The nominal story concerns the film production of an adaptation of Homer's Odyssey, on which Piccoli is the scriptwriter, much to the disgust of his wife Camille (Bardot) who preferred life when he merely wrote novels. Hired by Jack Palance's swaggering American producer to adapt the Greek epic for a film to be directed by the august Fritz Lang (director of M, here playing himself), Paul inadvertently sets in motion the elements which will unravel his marriage, earning his wife's contempt (the closest translation of the French word "mépris"). Soon, the tenderness of the film's opening sequence--wherein they loll naked on a bed as she coquettishly solicits his approval of each of her body parts--gives way to harrowing bickering, the meat of film's central 35-minute scene which will induce pained winces in anyone who has ever been through a bitter split-up. If that sounds harrowing, be reassured that Le Mépris is not without its lighter moments and joys: Godard's trademarked musings on the nature of cinema, Bardot looking exquisitely chic in a selection of soigné little outfits, Lang bemusedly quoting the German poet Hölderlin and Bertolt Brecht. As mannered as the New Wave posturings now seem, Le Mépris still looks unbeatably stylish, its themes as eternal as Homer and the Capri landscape. --Leslie Felperin

  • Gilda [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [1946] Gilda | Blu Ray | (27/06/2016) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.05 (43.10%)  |  RRP £27.99

    Gilda, are you decent? RITA HAYWORTH (The Lady from Shanghai) tosses her hair back and slyly responds, Me? in one of the great star entrances in movie history. Gilda, directed by CHARLES VIDOR (Cover Girl), features a sultry Hayworth in her most iconic role, as the much-lusted-after wife of a criminal kingpin (Paths of Glory's GEORGE MACREADY), as well as the former flame of his bitter henchman (3:10 to Yuma's GLENN FORD), and she drives them both mad with desire and jealousy. An ever-shifting battle of the sexes set on a Buenos Aires casino's glittering floor and in its shadowy back rooms, Gilda is among the most sensual of all Hollywood noirs. Special Features: New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack Audio commentary from 2010 by film critic Richard Schickel New interview with film noir historian Eddie Muller Appreciation of Gilda from 2010 featuring filmmakers Martin Scorsese and Baz Luhrmann Rita Hayworth: The Columbia Lady, a 2000 featurette on Hayworth's career as an actor and dancer Trailer PLUS: An essay by critic Sheila O'Malley Click Images to Enlarge

  • Ealing Boxset [Blu-ray] [1949] Ealing Boxset | Blu Ray | (31/03/2014) from £19.25  |  Saving you £20.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £39.99

    Ealing Studio output from the 1940s and the 1950s helped define what was arguably the golden age for British cinema. This Blu-ray collection brings together three much loved comedy classics directed by Ealing stalwarts Robert Hamer Charles Crichton and Alexander Mackendrick and starring the great Sir Alec Guinness in some of his most memorable roles.

  • The Wind Cannot Read [DVD] [1958] The Wind Cannot Read | DVD | (08/02/2010) from £10.33  |  Saving you £2.66 (20.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Made at the height of his Box Office success Dirk Bogarde stars as an RAF pilot caught up in a forbidden romance in this classic British film drama set in the Far East during the Second World War. Flight Lieutenant Michael Quinn (Dirk Bogarde) finds himself grounded in Delhi after his aircraft crashes and posted to a special Japanese language course for interrogators of prisoners-of-war. The Brigadier (Anthony Bushell) introduces Michael and his fellow officers to their new instructor an exquisitely beautiful young Japanese girl Susuki San (Yoko Tani). As the days pass Michael and Susuki spend their off-duty time exploring Delhi and their love grows. But there is a shadow between them - something that Susuki refuses to talk about. Michael even nicknames her 'Sabby' - because 'sabishii' is Japanese for sad... Before Michael can uncover Susuki's tragic secret however he is captured by the Japanese and the two lovers are parted...perhaps forever...

  • Count Baise - Live In Berlin And Stockholm [1968] Count Baise - Live In Berlin And Stockholm | DVD | (01/03/2008) from £11.59  |  Saving you £-2.60 (-28.90%)  |  RRP £8.99

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