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  • Rebecca Rebecca | DVD | (01/01/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £1.00 (16.70%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Whilst on holiday, young timid ladies companion (Joan Fontaine) meets handsome and wealthy widower Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) whose wife Rebecca has recently died in a boating accident.The two fall in love and marry. However, her joy is short lived when she returns to the de Winter estate and soon discovers that Rebecca still has a strange, unearthly hold over everyone there.

  • The Red Shoes [DVD] [1948] The Red Shoes | DVD | (06/07/2009) from £5.58  |  Saving you £10.41 (65.10%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The tragic and romantic story of Vicky Page the brilliant young dancer who must give up everything if she is to become a great ballerina is one of Powell and Pressburger's most famous films. Creators of classics such as Black Narcissus A Matter of Life And Death and The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp they were renowned for their use of brilliant colour and wonderful costumes and with the exhilarating cinematography of Jack Cardiff were among the most influential film makers of their time. The Red Shoes is one of the finest examples of their work and has become an inspiration to artists film makers and musicians all over the world.

  • Rocky Horror Picture Show - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1975] Rocky Horror Picture Show - 40th Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (05/10/2015) from £8.70  |  Saving you £6.29 (42.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    If a musical sci-fi satire about an alien transvestite named Frank-n-Furter, who is building the perfect man while playing sexual games with his virginal visitors, sounds like an intriguing premise for a movie, then you're in for a treat. Not only is The Rocky Horror Picture Show all this and more, but it stars the surprising cast of Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick (as the demure Janet and uptight Brad, who get lost in a storm and find themselves stranded at Frank-n-Furter's mansion), Meat Loaf (as the rebel Eddie), Charles Gray (as our criminologist and narrator) and, of course, the inimitable Tim Curry as our "sweet transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvania". Upon its release in 1975, the film was an astounding flop. But a few devotees persuaded a New York cinema to show it at midnight, and thus was born one of the ultimate cult films of all time. The songs are addictive (just try getting "The Time Warp" or "Toucha Toucha Touch Me" out of your head), the raunchiness amusing and the plot line utterly ridiculous--in other words, this film is simply tremendous good fun. The downfall, however, is that much of the amusement is found in the audience participation that is obviously missing from a video version (viewers in cinemas shout lines at the screen and use props--such as holding up newspapers and shooting water guns during the storm and throwing rice during a wedding scene). Watched alone as a straight movie, Rocky Horror loses a tremendous amount of its charm. Yet, for those who wish to perfect their lip-synching techniques for movie cinema performances or for those who want to gather a crowd around the TV at home for some good, old-fashioned, rowdy fun, this film can't be beat. --Jenny Brown

  • The Jazz Singer [1981] The Jazz Singer | DVD | (02/10/2006) from £12.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £16.99

    Back in 1927, The Jazz Singer entered the history books as the first true, sound-on-film talking picture, with Al Jolson uttering the immortal words, "You ain't heard nothing yet!" But even then it was a creakingly sentimental old yarn. By the time this second remake showed up in 1980 (there was a previous one in 1953) it looked as ludicrously dated as a chaperone in a strip club. Our young hero, played by pop singer Neil Diamond in a doomed bid for movie stardom, is the latest in a long line of Jewish cantors, but secretly moonlights with a Harlem soul group. When his strictly Orthodox father (Laurence Olivier, complete with painfully hammy "oya-veh" accent) finds out, the expected ructions follow. Though the lad makes it big in showbiz, it all means nothing while he's cut off from family and roots. But in the end--well, you can guess, can't you? Diamond comes across as likeable enough in a bland way, but unencumbered by acting talent, and the music business has never looked so squeaky clean--nary a trace of drugs, and precious little sex or rock 'n' roll. As for anything sounding remotely like jazz, forget it. This is one story that should have been left to slumber in the archives. --Philip Kemp

  • Double Indemnity [Masters of Cinema] (Blu-ray) Double Indemnity (Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (25/06/2012) from £9.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Director Billy Wilder (Sunset Boulevard) and writer Raymond Chandler (The Big Sleep) adapted James M. Cain's hard-boiled novel into this wildly thrilling story of insurance man Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray), who schemes the perfect murder with the beautiful dame Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck: kill Dietrichson's husband and make off with the insurance money. But, of course, in these plots things never quite go as planned, and Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson) is the wily insurance investigator who must sort things out. From the opening scene you know Neff is doomed, as the story is told in flashback; yet, to the film's credit, this doesn't diminish any of the tension of the movie. This early film noir flick is wonderfully campy by today's standards, and the dialogue is snappy ("I thought you were smarter than the rest, Walter. But I was wrong. You're not smarter, just a little taller"), filled with lots of "dame"s and "baby"s. Stanwyck is the ultimate femme fatale, and MacMurray, despite a career largely defined by roles as a softy (notably in the TV series My Three Sons and the movie The Shaggy Dog), is convincingly cast against type as the hapless, love-struck sap. --Jenny Brown

  • The Exorcist - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1973] [Region Free] The Exorcist - 40th Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (20/10/2014) from £10.29  |  Saving you £14.70 (58.80%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Director William Friedkin was a hot ticket in Hollywood after the success of The French Connection, and he turned heads (in more ways than one) when he decided to make The Exorcist as his follow-up film. Adapted by William Peter Blatty from his controversial best-seller, this shocking 1973 thriller set an intense and often-copied milestone for screen terror with its unflinching depiction of a young girl (Linda Blair) who is possessed by an evil spirit. Jason Miller and Max von Sydow are perfectly cast as the priests who risk their sanity and their lives to administer the rites of demonic exorcism, and Ellen Burstyn plays Blair's mother, who can only stand by in horror as her daughter's body is wracked by satanic disfiguration. One of the most frightening films ever made, The Exorcist was mysteriously plagued by troubles during production, and the years have not diminished its capacity to disturb even the most stoical viewers. --Jeff Shannon

  • Hello, Dolly! [DVD] [1969] Hello, Dolly! | DVD | (09/04/2012) from £5.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Barbra Streisand is a knockout as Dolly Levi, the woman who arranges things...like furniture and daffodils and lives. The famed plot concerns Dolly, a young widow and professional matchmaker who sets her sights on conquering tight-fisted Yonkers merchant, Horace Vandergeider, beautifully played by Walter Matthau. Over $20,000,000 was spent on DOLLY and you can see and hear every penny. The painstakingly re-created streetcars, shops, skyscrapers and town itself (circa 1900), the magnificent Harmonia Gardens set, Irene Sharoff's colour splashed costumes, Jerry Herman's hummingly tuneful direction. So, spend a magical evening with the incomparable Barbra - and see what great musicals are all about.

  • Harvey [1950] Harvey | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £5.59  |  Saving you £4.40 (44.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    This classic stage production gets a Hollywood make-over. James Stewart plays the title role as Elwood P. Dowd who befriends a human-sized rabbit by the name of Harvey: the trouble is only he can see him.

  • Doctor Who - Image of the Fendahl [DVD] Doctor Who - Image of the Fendahl | DVD | (20/04/2009) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A sonic time scan draws the TARDIS to the Fetch Priory on Earth. There the Doctor and Leela discover an impossibly old human skull that is the key to a nightmare from the Time Lords' past. A murderous monster stalks the priory grounds; and within someone is intent on unleashing a malevolent creature that feeds on death itself... This story was originally broadcast on BBC1 between 29th October - 19th November 1977

  • The Lost Weekend [Masters of Cinema] (Blu-ray) The Lost Weekend (Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (25/06/2012) from £10.29  |  Saving you £9.70 (48.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    "I'm not a drinker--I'm a drunk." These words, and the serious message behind them, were still potent enough in 1945 to shock audiences flocking to The Lost Weekend. The speaker is Don Birnam (Ray Milland), a handsome, talented, articulate alcoholic. The writing team of producer Charles Brackett and director Billy Wilder pull no punches in their depiction of Birnam's massive weekend bender, a tailspin that finds him reeling from his favorite watering hole to Bellevue Hospital. Location shooting in New York helps the street-level atmosphere, especially a sequence in which Birnam, a budding writer, tries to hock his typewriter for booze money. He desperately staggers past shuttered storefronts--it's Yom Kippur, and the pawnshops are closed. Milland, previously known as a lightweight leading man (he'd starred in Wilder's hilarious The Major and the Minor three years earlier), burrows convincingly under the skin of the character, whether waxing poetic about the escape of drinking or screaming his lungs out in the D.T.'s sequence. Wilder, having just made the ultra-noir Double Indemnity, brought a new kind of frankness and darkness to Hollywood's treatment of a social problem. At first the film may have seemed too bold; Paramount Pictures nearly killed the release of the picture after it tested poorly with preview audiences. But once in release, The Lost Weekend became a substantial hit, and won four Oscars: for picture, director, screenplay, and actor. --Robert Horton

  • Far From the Madding Crowd [DVD] [1967] Far From the Madding Crowd | DVD | (01/06/2015) from £4.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (72.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Headstrong and passionate Bathsheba Everdene (Julie Christie) unexpectedly inherits a large farm in rural Dorset. Struggling to manage the farm herself, she captivates the hearts and minds of three very different men: an honest and hardworking sheep farmer (Alan Bates), a wealthy but tortured landowner (Peter Finch), and a reckless and violent swordsman (Terence Stamp). But as emotions become entangled, free spirited and innocent folly soon leads to devastating tragedy. The restoration process of Far From the Madding Crowd was overseen by the film's cinematographer and acclaimed director, Nicolas Roeg. The Digital Film restoration was funded by STUDIOCANAL in collaboration the BFI's Unlocking Film Heritage programme, Awarding funds from the National Lottery. Extras: New Interview with Terence Stamp New Interview with Frederic Raphael New Interview with Nic Roeg New featurette Devizes, then and now Original Location featurette

  • A Town Like Alice [1956] A Town Like Alice | DVD | (24/07/2006) from £7.48  |  Saving you £5.51 (42.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Virginia McKenna and Peter Finch star in this moving story about a party of women compelled to trek through the Malayan jungle during World War II as no Japanese office will take responsibility for their care. Based on Nevil Shute's best selling novel the film tells how the women come to terms with their hardships and how they are befriended by a tough Australian prisoner of war who dreams of returning to his home town of Alice Springs...

  • Zorba the Greek [DVD] [1964] Zorba the Greek | DVD | (02/07/2012) from £5.29  |  Saving you £4.70 (47.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    An uptight English writer traveling to Crete on a matter of business finds his life changed forever when he meets the gregarious Alexis Zorba.

  • Doctor Who - The Deadly Assassin [DVD] Doctor Who - The Deadly Assassin | DVD | (11/05/2009) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Doctor arrives on Gallifrey where he is accused of the assassination of the Time Lord President. Investigating with the aid of Co-ordinator Engin and Castellan Spandrell he discovers that this is part of a plot hatched by his old adversary the Master. Having used up all twelve of his regenerations the Master is now a wizened husk. He is seeking to control the presidency in order to obtain the official regalia the Sash and Rod of Rassilon which are really keys to the Eye of Harmony the source of all the Time Lords' power.

  • The Glass Mountain [1949] The Glass Mountain | DVD | (14/04/2008) from £8.39  |  Saving you £1.60 (16.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The Glass Mountain is a classic British film romance enriched with the sublime music of Italian opera. Shot down over the Italian Alps during the Second World War RAF pilot Richard Wilder (Michael Dennison) is rescued and nursed back to health by Alida (Valentina Cortesa) a beautiful young partisan girl. She shares with him the local fables of The Glass Mountain and he in turn spins them into an enchanting opera...

  • Summer Holiday [1963] Summer Holiday | DVD | (26/02/2007) from £7.48  |  Saving you £5.51 (42.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    From the First Kiss to the Last Blush It's the Craziest Riot On Wheels! Borrowing a double-decker bus for a mobile home four young mechanics search for fun in the sun from London to Athens. Bachelor Boy Cliff Richard dons his dancing shoes and brings a beat to the beach in the breeziest Summer Holiday on record!

  • A Night to Remember [Blu-ray] [1958] A Night to Remember | Blu Ray | (19/03/2012) from £6.29  |  Saving you £13.70 (68.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Two years after 20th Century Fox released its melodramatic disaster film Titanic in 1953, Walter Lord's meticulously researched book A Night to Remember surprised its publishers by becoming a phenomenal bestseller. Lord had an intuition that readers craved the reality of the Titanic disaster and not the romantically mythologised translations (like Fox's film, starring Barbara Stanwyck), which relied on fictional characters to "enhance" the world's worst maritime disaster. Lord's book proved that the truth was far more compelling than fiction, outlining the many "if onlys" (if only the iceberg had been spotted a few minutes earlier, etc.) that lent sombre irony to the loss of 1,500 Titanic passengers. Three years after Lord's book appeared, it was brought to the screen with the kind of riveting authenticity that Lord had insisted upon in his own research. The 1958 British production of A Night to Remember remains a definitive dramatization of the disaster, adhering to the known facts of the time and achieving a documentary-like immediacy that matches (and in some ways surpasses) the James Cameron epic released 39 years later. The film erroneously perpetuates the once-common belief that the Titanic sunk in one piece (instead of breaking in half as its bow began to plunge), but many other misconceptions are accurately corrected, and the intelligent screenplay by thriller master Eric Ambler is a model of factual suspense. By making Titanic the star of the film, director Roy Baker emphasises the excessive confidence of the booming industrial age and creates an intense you-are-there realism that pays tribute to Walter Lord's tenacious quest for truth. --Jeff Shannon

  • La Strada [Blu-ray] [1954] La Strada | Blu Ray | (19/06/2017) from £12.95  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Regarded by some as Federico Fellini's finest work, and the winner of the first Academy Award® for Best Foreign Language Film, La Strada is a masterpiece of 20th Century filmmaking. Sold by her impoverished mother to Zampano (Anthony Quinn), a brutish fairground wrestler, waif-like Gelsomina (Giulietta Masina) lives a life of drudgery as his assistant. After taking to the road with a travelling circus, a budding relationship with Il Matto/The Fool (Richard Basehart), a gentle-natured, tightrope walking clown, offers a potential refuge from her master's clutches. Trapped by her own servile nature, Gelsomina waivers, and Zampano's volcanic temper erupts with tragic consequences. SPECIAL FEATURES: New Interview with director Julian Jarrold New Interview with Peter Matthews, Senior Lecturer, Film & Television, London College of Communication The Guardian Interview: Anthony Quinn (recorded at the BFI in 1995) Giulietta Masina 1955 Cannes interview Audio commentary by Chris Weigand on selected scenes

  • Leave Her to Heaven [DVD] [1945] Leave Her to Heaven | DVD | (24/09/2012) from £6.75  |  Saving you £3.20 (32.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Leave Her to Heaven is one of the most unblinkingly perverse movies ever offered up as a prestige picture by a major studio in the golden age of Hollywood. Gene Tierney, whose lambent eyes, porcelain features, and sweep of healthy-American-girl hair customarily made her a 20th Century Fox icon of purity, scored an Oscar nomination playing a demonically obsessive daughter of privilege with her own monstrous notion of love. By the time she crosses eyebeams with popular novelist Cornel Wilde on a New Mexico-bound train, her jealous manipulations have driven her parents apart and her father to his grave. Well, no, not grave: Wilde soon gets to watch her gallop a glorious palomino across a red-rock horizon as she metronomically sows Dad's ashes to the winds. Mere screen moments later, she's jettisoned rising-politico fiancé Vincent Price and accepted a marriage proposal the besotted/bewildered Wilde hasn't quite made. Can the wrecking of his and several other lives be far behind? Not to mention a murder or two. Fox gave Ben Ames Williams's bestselling novel (probably just the sort of book Wilde's character writes) the Class-A treatment. Alfred Newman's tympani-heavy music score signals both grandeur and pervasive psychosis, while spectacular, dust-jacket-worthy locations and Oscar-destined Technicolor cinematography by Leon Shamroy ensure our fixed gaze. Impeccably directed by the veteran John M. Stahl (who'd made the original Back Street, Imitation of Life, and Magnificent Obsession a decade earlier), the result is at once cuckoo and hieratic, and weirdly mesmerizing. Bet Luis Buñuel loved it. --Richard T. Jameson

  • We Were Soldiers [2002] We Were Soldiers | DVD | (05/11/2007) from £3.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (69.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    In a place soon to be known as 'The Valley of Death' in a small clearing called landing zone X-Ray Lt. Colonel Hal Moore (Mel Gibson) and 400 young troops all from an elite American combat division were surrounded by 2 000 North Vietnamese soldiers. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history...

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