HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

Search Results

  • Jane Eyre [DVD] [1944] Jane Eyre | DVD | (14/03/2011) from £7.79  |  Saving you £7.20 (48.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

    An all-star cast - including Orson Welles Joan Fontaine Agnes Moorehead and Elizabeth Taylor - breathes magnificent life into this captivating 1943 black and white film version of Charlotte Bront's gothic romance novel. Adapted for the screen by Aldous Huxley Robert Stevenson and John Houseman and directed by Stevenson this stirring film is the definitive version of the engrossing classic! After spending her childhood in an orphanage young Jane Eyre (Fontaine) becomes governess to the ward of an imposing older man named Edward Rochester (Welles). Ultimately Jane's gentle influence forces Rochester to drop his forbidding veneer and he proposes to her. But the discovery that Rochester is already married and further that his volatile wife is locked in the attic prompts Jane to leave as a series of tragic events unfold in this riveting classic that also features Margaret O'Brien.

  • Kind Hearts And Coronets [DVD] [1949] Kind Hearts And Coronets | DVD | (05/09/2011) from £8.48  |  Saving you £7.51 (47.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Set in the stately Edwardian era Kind Hearts And Coronets is black comedy at is best with the most articulate and literate of all Ealing screenplays. Sir Alec Guinness gives a virtuoso performance in his Ealing comedy debut playing all eight victims standing between a mass-murderer and his family fortune. Considered by some to be Ealing's most perfect achievement of all the Ealing films.

  • Rear Window - 60th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1954] [Region Free] Rear Window - 60th Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (04/08/2014) from £8.39  |  Saving you £9.60 (53.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Like the Greenwich Village courtyard view from its titular portal, Alfred Hitchcock's classic Rear Window is both confined and multileveled: both its story and visual perspective are dictated by its protagonist's imprisonment in his apartment, convalescing in a wheelchair, from which both he and the audience observe the lives of his neighbors. Cheerful voyeurism, as well as the behavior glimpsed among the various tenants, affords a droll comic atmosphere that gradually darkens when he sees clues to what may be a murder. Photographer L.B. "Jeff" Jeffries (James Stewart) is, in fact, a voyeur by trade, a professional photographer sidelined by an accident while on assignment. His immersion in the human drama (and comedy) visible from his window is a by-product of boredom, underlined by the disapproval of his girlfriend, Lisa (Grace Kelly), and a wisecracking visiting nurse (Thelma Ritter). Yet when the invalid wife of Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr) disappears, Jeff enlists the two women to help him to determine whether she's really left town, as Thorwald insists, or been murdered. Hitchcock scholar Donald Spoto convincingly argues that the crime at the center of this mystery is the MacGuffin--a mere pretext--in a film that's more interested in the implications of Jeff's sentinel perspective. We actually learn more about the lives of the other neighbors (given generic names by Jeff, even as he's drawn into their lives) he, and we, watch undetected than we do the putative murderer and his victim. Jeff's evident fear of intimacy and commitment with the elegant, adoring Lisa provides the other vital thread to the script, one woven not only into the couple's own relationship, but reflected and even commented upon through the various neighbours' lives. At minimum, Hitchcock's skill at making us accomplices to Jeff's spying, coupled with an ingenious escalation of suspense as the teasingly vague evidence coalesces into ominous proof, deliver a superb thriller spiked with droll humour, right up to its nail-biting, nightmarish climax. At deeper levels, however, Rear Window plumbs issues of moral responsibility and emotional honesty, while offering further proof (were any needed) of the director's brilliance as a visual storyteller. --Sam Sutherland

  • Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte [DVD] [1964] Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte | DVD | (09/04/2012) from £4.19  |  Saving you £5.80 (58.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Poor Charlotte Hollis. She's been shunned by the community for decades, ever since the fateful night in 1927 when her lover was hacked apart with an axe. Her antebellum southern mansion is slated for the bulldozer, as it stands in the way of highway construction. Charlotte's only hope lies in her cousin Miriam (Olivia de Havilland), coming down from up north to help settle things. Miriam, however, has other designs. Together with her boyfriend Drew (Joseph Cotten), she embarks on a scheme to systematically drive Charlotte out of her mind (not a great leap) and get her mitts on the family fortune. From there, things only get more complicated. Charlotte puts the "gothic" in southern gothic, as a great showcase for completely bizarre, overwrought, and out-of-control performances from all involved. Agnes Moorehead plays Charlotte's loyal, dishevelled housekeeper to the hilt, with an odd inflection that calls to mind Amos and Andy more than southern gentility. As the drunken, conniving Dr. Drew, Cotten's accent is indeterminate at times, and seems to come and go. As great as the supporting players are, though, the crown goes to Bette Davis as the shrieking Charlotte, a portrait of isolation and decay stuck in a world of tragic delusions inside her crumbling mansion. De Havilland is a close second as the scheming Miriam; the scene where she slaps the holy snot out of a hysterical Charlotte is itself worth the price of admission. Mary Astor (in her last role) and Cecil Kellaway (as a kindly Lloyd's of London adjuster) put in the only performances with any restraint, acting as counterweights for the rest of the cast. Besides, you'll never get another chance to see Joseph Cotten playing the harpsichord and singing, or caked in mud and lily pads! With Robert Aldrich's claustrophobic direction, Charlotte is as Southern as a field of kudzu, and as subdued as a train wreck. --Jerry Renshaw

  • Citizen Kane [Blu-ray] Citizen Kane | Blu Ray | (29/08/2016) from £5.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Arguably the greatest of American films, Orson Welles' 1941 masterpiece, made when he was only 25, still unfurls like a dream and carries the viewer along the mysterious currents of time and memory to reach a mature (if ambiguous) conclusion: people are the sum of their contradictions and can't be known easily. Welles plays newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane, taken from his mother as a boy and made the ward of a rich industrialist. The result is that every well-meaning or tyrannical or self-destructive move he makes for the rest of his life appears in some way to be a reaction to that deeply wounding event. Written by Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz, and photographed by Gregg Toland, the film is the sum of Welles's awesome ambitions as an artist in Hollywood. He pushes the limits of then-available technology to create a true magic show, a visual and aural feast that almost seems to be rising up from a viewer's subconscious. As Kane, Welles even ushers in the influence of Bertolt Brechton film acting. This is truly a one-of-a-kind work, and in many ways is still the most modern of modern films this century. --Tom Keogh

  • The Innocents [1961] The Innocents | DVD | (11/12/2006) from £6.81  |  Saving you £13.18 (65.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Innocents tells of an impressionable and repressed governess Miss Giddens (Deborah Kerr) who agrees to tutor two orphaned children Miles (Martin Stephens) and Flora (Pamela Franklin). On arrival at Bly House she becomes convinced that the children are possessed by the perverse spirits of former governess Miss Jessel (Clytie Jessop) and her Heathcliffe-like lover Quint (Peter Wyngarde) who both met with mysterious deaths.

  • Nosferatu Ltd. Edition Steelbook [Masters of Cinema] Dual Format [Blu-ray & DVD] Nosferatu Ltd. Edition Steelbook Dual Format | Blu Ray | (18/11/2013) from £19.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (33.30%)  |  RRP £29.99

    An iconic film of the German expressionist cinema and one of the most famous of all silent movies F. W. Murnau's Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror continues to haunt - and indeed terrify - modern audiences with the unshakable power of its images. By teasing a host of occult atmospherics out of dilapidated set-pieces and innocuous real-world locations alike Murnau captured on celluloid the deeply-rooted elements of a waking nightmare and launched the signature Murnau-style that would change cinema history forever. In this first-ever screen adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula a simple real-estate transaction leads an intrepid businessman deep into the superstitious heart of Transylvania. There he encounters the otherworldly Count Orlok - portrayed by the legendary Max Schreck in a performance the very backstory of which has spawned its own mythology - who soon after embarks upon a cross-continental voyage to take up residence in a distant new land... and establish his ambiguous dominion. As to whether the count's campaign against the plague-wracked populace erupts from satanic decree erotic compulsion or the simple impulse of survival - that remains perhaps the greatest mystery of all in this film that's like a blackout... Remade by Werner Herzog in 1979 (and inspiring films as diverse as Abel Ferrara's King of New York and The Addiction and E. Elias Merhige's Shadow of the Vampire) F. W. Murnau's surreal 1922 cine-fable remains the original and landmark entry in the entire global tradition of the horror film. The Masters of Cinema Series is proud to present newly restored on 1080p Blu-ray at long last Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror in its definitive restoration complete with original intertitles and accompanied by the score that played with the film at the time of its initial release. Special Features: Brand new high-definition restoration by Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung Two audio commentaries: one newly recorded by film historian David Kalat; the second by historian R. Dixon Smith and critic Brad Stevens The Language of Shadows a 53-minute documentary on Murnau's early years and the filming of Nosferatu New video interview with BFI Film Classics Nosferatu author Kevin Jackson Newly translated English subtitles with original German intertitles More surprises to be revealed closer to release date! PLUS: a 56-page booklet featuring writings and rare imagery

  • The Day the Earth Stood Still [DVD] [1951] The Day the Earth Stood Still | DVD | (05/11/2012) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The very epitome of a cult SF classic, The Day the Earth Stood Still is more often referenced than seen, which is a pity since it remains even now one of the most thought-provoking examples of the genre. The title is a misnomer, a mere tease to entice 1950s audiences into the cinema in the expectation of seeing another sensationalist B-movie about murderous aliens (i.e. Communists). In fact, Robert Wise's film of Edmund North's screenplay is a thoughtful Cold War allegory about a Christ-like visitor (Michael Rennie) who comes to Earth preaching a message of salvation for mankind, only to be spurned, killed then finally resurrected (significantly, Rennie's character Klaatu adopts the pseudonym "Mr Carpenter" while on the run from the authorities). Aside from its philosophical message, the film also boasts memorable imagery--notably the giant robot Gort--a much-quoted catchphrase in "Klaatu barada nikto", and one of composer Bernard Herrmann's most admired scores, featuring the theremin and other electronic instruments that must have sounded very otherworldly back in 1951. The result is a bona fide landmark in cinema SF with a central message about "weapons of mass destruction" that's still uncannily relevant today. On the DVD: The Day the Earth Stood Still has been splendidly restored for its DVD incarnation from the original 35 mm print, and the results are demonstrated in the "Restoration Comparison" feature. Also included is a fascinating 1951 newsreel showing Klaatu receiving a certificate of merit amid stories of Communist threats, the Korean war and beauty pageants ("Pomp and pulchritude on parade in Atlantic City"). Best of all is an absorbing commentary track with director Robert Wise in conversation with Nicholas Meyer (both men have Star Trek movies on their CV). --Mark Walker

  • The Misfits [DVD] [1961] The Misfits | DVD | (23/07/2012) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A sexy divorce falls for an over-the-hill cowboy who is struggling to maintain his romantically independent lifestyle in early-sixties Nevada.

  • Doctor Who - Time-Flight & Arc of Infinity Doctor Who - Time-Flight & Arc of Infinity | DVD | (06/08/2007) from £9.99  |  Saving you £20.00 (66.70%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Time Flight: The Doctor finally manages to deliver Tegan to Heathrow Airport where he gets drawn into investigating the in-flight disappearance of a Concorde. Following the same flight path in another Concorde with the TARDIS stowed in the hold he discovers that it has been transported back millions of years into the past through a time corridor. Arc of Infinity: An antimatter creature has crossed into normal space via a phenomenon known as the Arc of Infinity but needs to bond physically with a Time Lord in order to remain stable. A traitor on Gallifrey has chosen the Doctor as the victim.

  • 300 Spartans [1962] 300 Spartans | DVD | (01/10/2007) from £3.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Based on actual event occurring in 480 B.C. Greece. This scintillating drama stars Richard Egan as the Greek soldier Leonidas who led 300 Spartan soldiers against an overwhelming Persian army in the Battle of Thermopylae. Unable to recruit the soldiers he needs to defend a critical Greek mountain pass against Persias King Xerxes Leonidas nonetheless prepares for battle. When warned that the number of arrows his tiny army will face ""will blot out the sun"" Leonidas replies that his army will ""fight in the shade."" With it's superb cinematography realism and musical score this story of courage and self-sacrifice is inspired filmmaking at it's best.

  • Fallen Idol [Blu-ray] [1948] Fallen Idol | Blu Ray | (02/05/2016) from £11.48  |  Saving you £11.51 (50.10%)  |  RRP £22.99

  • Dracula (Blu-ray + DVD) [1958] Dracula (Blu-ray + DVD) | Blu Ray | (28/10/2013) from £9.60  |  Saving you £14.10 (56.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    There's no shortage of competition in the battle to be named the ultimate screen Dracula, but Peter Cushing's turn in Terence Fisher's take on Bram Stoker's classic novel surely makes him a candidate worth considering. As the first Hammer Dracula movie, it's long been cherished by both Hammer and horror enthusiasts. And this Blu-ray release could, with some justification, be described as definitive. There are several reasons for this. Firstly, this release brings together two different takes on the feature, including the 2012 restoration work from Hammer itself, which added in material that had been unseen for many years. Furthermore, the film's transfer is excellent, a real labour of love and an outright justification alone for getting hold of the Blu-ray. But then there are the further two discs of extra material, which dig into the story of the film, as well as spending some time exploring the restoration work that brought it into its current state. Furthermore, there's an excellent commentary track to enjoy as well. The film itself? It remains the star of the show, and one of the best of Hammer's impressive catalogue. Cushing is magnetic in the central role, and the supporting work from the likes of Christopher Lee and Michael Gough adds majesty to an already impressive production. How refreshing, then, that it's all arrived packaged on a Rolls Royce-standard disc release, that shows that with real care and diligence, it's possible to put together Blu-ray packages of older films that are something really very special indeed. --Jon Foster

  • As You Like It [2006] As You Like It | DVD | (25/02/2008) from £6.29  |  Saving you £11.70 (65.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    With a setting inspired by 19th Century Japan Kenneth Branagh adapts Shakespeare's lightest and most delightful comedy As You Like It. A celebration of the enduring power of love in all its many disguises. Witty playful and utterly magical the story is a compelling romantic adventure in which Rosalind and Orlando's famous courtship is played out against a backdrop of political rivalry banishment and exile in Forest of Arden.

  • Dad's Army: The Movie [DVD] [1971] Dad's Army: The Movie | DVD | (23/11/2015) from £4.07  |  Saving you £1.92 (32.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Five fine episodes of the evergreen Home Guard sitcom here. Dad's Army endures because it combines a healthy dollop of self-mockery with a sense of pride in Britain's lonely defiance against Hitler's might in 1940, encapsulated in the pompous and incompetent yet courageous Captain Mainwaring. Arthur Lowe is sublime in this role. Though he generally acts as a foil to his flippant platoon of funny stereotypes (Walker, Frazier, Godfrey, etc.), his subtle double-takes and apoplectic facial expressions of exasperation are endlessly hilarious. Corporal Jones' doddery recklessness can generally be relied upon to culminate in a finale involving trousers, cries of "Don't panic!" and chases across country but the masterstroke of this series was the casting against type of John Le Mesurier as the vague, aristocratic Sergeant and Lowe as his military but not social superior. These episodes include "The Day The Balloon Went Up" (a typically frantic caper involving a stray barrage balloon), "The Two And A Half Feathers" (including a wonderful Jonesy flashback to his days in the Sudan) and "The Deadly Attachment", in which Pike cheeks the captain of a captive U-Boat crew, who demands his name to add to his "list" of insolent Englanders. "Don't tell him, Pike!" urges Mainwaring. --David Stubbs

  • Escape from Alcatraz [Blu-ray] [1979][Region Free] Escape from Alcatraz | Blu Ray | (03/06/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    One of Clint Eastwood's two most important filmmaking mentors was Don Siegel (the other was Sergio Leone), who directed Eastwood in Dirty Harry, Coogan's Bluff, Two Mules for Sister Sara and this enigmatic, 1979 drama based on a true story about an escape from the island prison of Alcatraz. Eastwood plays a new convict who enters into a kind of mind game with the chilly warden (Patrick McGoohan) and organises a break leading into the treacherous waters off San Francisco. As jailbird movies go, this isn't just a grotty, unpleasant experience but a character-driven work with some haunting twists. --Tom Keogh

  • The Dam Busters [Blu-ray] [1954] The Dam Busters | Blu Ray | (14/06/2010) from £8.89  |  Saving you £11.10 (55.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Dr Barnes Wallis was possessed with a seemingly crazy idea - the creation of a bouncing bomb designed to destroy the Ruhr dams and paralyse the enemy's industrial nerve centre. He fought persistent scepticism and disbelief that such a feat was possible though even with the matchless skill of RAF Wing Commander Guy Gibson and his squadron could such a mission succeed?

  • Star! [DVD] [1968] Star! | DVD | (05/11/2012) from £5.29  |  Saving you £4.70 (47.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Julie Andrews stars as stage legend Gertrude Lawrence, a glamorous, flamboyant and charismatic personality - a woman who is both 'maddening and infuriating' and 'probably the most beautiful and entrancing creature ever to walk onto a stage.' Robert Wise's lavish musical recalls the golden age of musical theatre, from 1912 to 1940. Lawrence rises from irrepressible chorus girl in the music halls to become the toast of two continents. Her lifelong friend Noel Coward (Daniel Massey) provides w...

  • Greyfriars Bobby [1960] Greyfriars Bobby | DVD | (03/07/2006) from £4.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (66.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Overflowing with warmth and charm Greyfriars Bobby celebrates the powerful bond between man and a kind and loving animal. Based on Eleanor Atkinson's immortal children's book - Walt Disney presents the remarkable true story of one of Scotland's most beloved and celebrated heroes - a terrier named Bobby. The enduring friendship forged between a tenderhearted shepherd known simply as Old Jock and his devoted dog cannot be broken - even by the kindly old man's death. Set in bustling Victorian Edinburgh and the breathtaking Scottish countryside Greyfriars Bobby is a sensitive tale of uncommon loyalty and affection that is certain to delight and inspire one and all!

  • A Man For All Seasons [1966] A Man For All Seasons | DVD | (12/02/2007) from £3.00  |  Saving you £9.99 (76.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A Man For All Seasons: a motion picture for all time! Winner of six Academy Awards - including 1966 Best Picture - 'A Man For All Seasons' stars Paul Scofield as Sir Thomas More a respected English statesman whose steadfast refusal to recognise King Henry VIII's marriage to Anne Boleyn cost him his head. Featuring an all-star supporting cast - Wendy Hiller Leo McKern Robert Shaw Orson Welles Susannah York and Vanessa Redgrave - and directed by two-time Oscar-winner Fred Zinnemann Robert Bolt's A Man For All Seasons is ""a picture that inspires admiration courage and thought."" - The New York Times.

Not found what you're looking for?
Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us