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  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [2002] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (21/07/2003) from £9.99  |  Saving you £4.07 (25.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest revolves around the clever scheming of two friends Algernon Moncrieff (Rupert Everett) and Jack Worthing (Colin Firth) both of whom lead double lives in order to increase their opportunities for pleasure. Jack who lives in the country comes to London as often as he can to look after his wicked invented brother Earnest while Algernon creates an invalid friend called Bunbury whose constant illnesses allow him to escape family pressures

  • The Lizzie McGuire Movie [2003] The Lizzie McGuire Movie | DVD | (02/02/2004) from £4.99  |  Saving you £11.96 (66.50%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The Lizzie McGuire Movie spins around the axis of Disney Channel starlet Hilary Duff, whose glossy good looks and rather mature figure are balanced by a sweetly bashful persona and an endearing klutziness. On a school trip to Rome, Lizzie is discovered to be the virtual twin of an Italian pop star named Isabella--and her dreamy former partner wants Lizzie to take Isabella's place at an award show to avoid a lawsuit. Only Lizzie's loyal best friend Gordo (Adam Lamberg) suspects that Paolo may not be all that he seems. The Lizzie McGuire Movie is competent fluff, with the most fun to be had coming from Lizzie's pesky little brother (Jake Thomas) and his Machiavellian friend Melina (Carly Schroeder), who plot to humiliate Lizzie for fun and personal gain. It also features Alex Borstein as Lizzie's tyrannical principal and chaperone. --Bret Fetzer

  • Chicken Run [2000] Chicken Run | DVD | (04/12/2000) from £5.59  |  Saving you £7.40 (57.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    As warming as a nice cup of tea on a cloudy day, Chicken Run is that charming singularity, a commercially successful British family movie that has near-universal appeal without compromising its inherent British pluckiness (that will be the first and last poultry-pun in this review). It invites us into the Plasticine-world of Tweedy's farm, a far-from-free-range egg factory ruled with an axe of iron by greedy Mrs.Tweedy. One intrepid chicken, Ginger (voiced by Julia Sawalha) sets her sights on breaking out the whole flock, a cast of beautifully individuated chicken characters including ditsy Babs (voiced by Jane Horrocks), matronly Bunty (Imelda Staunton) and practical-minded Mac (Lynn Ferguson). Each effort is thwarted, and Ginger repeatedly reaps a spell in the coal bunker for her troubles, prompting the first of many allusions to The Great Escape, one of several World War II films name-checked throughout. (Grown-ups will have a ball playing Spot-the-Allusion Game here.) When an American rooster named Rocky (Mel Gibson) literally drops in from the air, the hens are set all a-flutter with excitement thinking he'll help teach them to fly away at last. But Rocky is not all he seems. Although the action sags just a fraction around the 40-minute mark, it's the set pieces that really lift this into the realm of cartoon genius: the montage of inept flying attempts, Rocky and Ginger's narrow escape from Mrs Tweedy's new pie machine (an horrific contraption of chomping steel and industrial menace) and the magnificent, soaring climax. Despite the fact British animators (such as the directors, Nick Park and Peter Lord, themselves) regularly scoop Oscars for their short films, our record in full-feature length cartoons has been scrappy at best. There have been a few highlights--Animal Farm (1955), The Yellow Submarine (1968), Watership Down (1978)--and, er, that's about it really, unless you count The Magic Roundabout: Dougal and the Blue Cat. ChickenRun, made by the Aardman production house who produced the delightful Wallace and Gromit shorts among many other treats, has proved that Britain can compete with the most calculated, merchandised and screen-tested Disney production and win. --Leslie Felperin

  • The Santa Clause 2 [2002] The Santa Clause 2 | DVD | (17/11/2003) from £4.29  |  Saving you £13.70 (76.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Considering how lame this sequel could have been, The Santa Clause 2 makes for a pleasant seasonal diversion. It's got the familiar smell of Disney marketeering, and more than a few parents will object to this further embellishment of the St Nick legend, but Tim Allen's amiable presence provides ample compensation. As a divorced dad who inherited the jolly man's job in The Santa Clause, Allen now faces another Yuletide challenge. According to the "Missus Clause" in his North Pole contract, he can't continue to be the real Santa until he gets married. As luck and five credited screenwriters would have it, Allen falls for the Scroogey principal (Elizabeth Mitchell) of his son's school, while a phoney, power-hungry duplicate Santa wreaks havoc on the North Pole's overworked elves. It's all as sweet as spiced eggnog, with that warmed-over feel of a mandated sequel, but the Christmas spirit does prevail with the sound of sleigh bells and Allen's rosy-cheeked "Ho, ho, ho!". --Jeff Shannon

  • The Lady Vanishes [1938] The Lady Vanishes | DVD | (18/08/2008) from £4.08  |  Saving you £1.91 (31.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Intrigue and espionage and the effects on the lives and futures of passengers aboard a Trans-Continental Express emerge when a girl traveller (Margaret Lockwood) returning from a holiday strikes up an acquaintance with a middle-aged English governess who during the journey mysteriously disappears from her compartment. The girl seeking an explanation for the disappearance is accused of hallucinating and is nearly convinced that her new friend does not exist.

  • Penelope [2007] Penelope | DVD | (23/06/2008) from £3.89  |  Saving you £14.10 (78.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Penelope is afflicted by a secret family curse that can only be broken when she is loved by one of her own kind. Hidden away in the family's majestic home she is subjected to meeting a string of blue-bloods through her parent's futile attempt to marry her off and break the curse. Each suitor is instantly enamored with Penelope (and her sizable dowry)... until the curse is revealed. When a willing mate cannot be found mischievous tabloid reporter Lemon (Peter Dinklage) hires Max (James McAvoy) to pose as a prospective suitor in hopes of snapping a photo of the mysterious 'Penelope.' Max who is really a down-on-his-luck gambler finds himself drawn to Penelope and not wanting to expose or disappoint her disappears and leaves Lemon in the lurch. Fed up by this latest betrayal and determined to live life on her own terms Penelope breaks free from her family and goes out into the world in search of adventure - curse be damned.

  • Mary Poppins - 45th Anniversary Edition [1964] Mary Poppins - 45th Anniversary Edition | DVD | (02/03/2009) from £6.95  |  Saving you £9.22 (51.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Mary Poppins is one of Disney's most enchanting fantasies and the motion-picture hit that made 'supercalifragilisticexpialidocious' a household word! Julie Andrews stars as the loveable nanny who soars out of the skies and into the hearts of everyone she encounters. Toting a carpetbag full of magical adventures Mary and her fun-loving sidekick Bert (Dick Van Dyke) deliver endless joy and surprises to a troubled family.

  • Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House [1948] Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House | DVD | (04/05/2007) from £7.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (20.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Cary Grant and Myrna Loy draw up a blueprint for hilarity! New York adman Jim Blandings is ready to say goodbye to his cramped city apartment and build from the ground up a Connecticut home with room enough for his growing family and dreams. All it will cost him is his time and money... and perhaps his job marriage happiness and what's left of his sanity. Goodbye Manhattan. Hello comedy. As Jim Cary Grant is a flustered poster boy for homeowner anxiety in this gleeful laughfest. Myrna Loy her voice and line phrasing like musical chimes plays Jim's ever patient wife. Louise Beavers is the sunny housemaid whose enthusiasm for Wham Ham saves Jim's career bacon. And Melvyn Douglas is the perhaps too friendly family friend. ""Drop in and see us sometime "" Jim says. Invitation accepted.

  • You Again [DVD] [2010] You Again | DVD | (28/03/2011) from £4.29  |  Saving you £5.70 (57.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    When a young woman realizes her brother is about to marry the girl who bullied her in high school she sets out to expose the fiance's true colors.

  • The Importance of Being Earnest [DVD] The Importance of Being Earnest | DVD | (02/05/2011) from £5.15  |  Saving you £14.84 (74.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest revolves around the clever scheming of two friends Algernon Moncrieff (Rupert Everett) and Jack Worthing (Colin Firth) both of whom lead double lives in order to increase their opportunities for pleasure. Jack who lives in the country comes to London as often as he can to look after his wicked invented brother Earnest while Algernon creates an invalid friend called Bunbury whose constant illnesses allow him to escape family pressures in London. The pairs' deception leads to complications in their romantic lives when they are discovered by Cecily (Reese Witherspoon) Jack's ward whom Algernon is pursuing and Gwendolyn (Frances O'Connor) Algernon's cousin whom Jack adores. Looming over everything and everyone is Gwendolyn's mother Lady Bracknell (Judi Dench) a tyrannical figure with plots of her own to hatch. The pursuit of love sex money and social position lead all the characters into a series of hilarious entanglements.

  • Bringing Up Baby Bringing Up Baby | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £7.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (20.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A dog belonging to an eccentric heiress (Hepburn) steals a dinosaur bone from David (Grant) an absent-minded Zoology professor. David follows the heiress to her home and all hell breaks loose when he loses his pet leopard known as 'Baby'. Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn give fantastic performances in one of Hollywood's finest screwball comedies superbly directed by Howard Hawks.

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [1952] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (30/04/2001) from £19.98  |  Saving you £-9.99 (-100.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    If you're looking for the definitive example of dry wit, look no further than this 1952 version of The Importance of Being Earnest. Of course, it helps to have Oscar Wilde's beloved play as source material, but this exquisite adaptation has a charmed life of its own, with a perfectly matched director and a once-in-a-lifetime cast. Mix these ingredients with Wilde's inimitable repartee, and you've got a comedic soufflé that's cooked to perfection. Opening with a proscenium nod to its theatrical origins, the film turns Wilde's comedy of clever deception and mixed identities into a cinematic treat, and while the 10-member cast is uniformly superb, special credit must be given to Dame Edith Evans, reprising her stage role as the imperiously stuffy Lady Bracknell. To hear her Wilde-ly hilarious inflections and elongated syllables is to witness British comedy in its purest form. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • It's A Wonderful Life [1946] It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (09/11/2007) from £3.91  |  Saving you £9.47 (52.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

  • The Red Shoes [1948] The Red Shoes | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £16.98  |  Saving you £-6.99 (-70.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Overall, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's 1948 tale of the tragic ballerina Vicky Page (Moira Shearer) is not in the top drawer of their achievements. The backstage wranglings offer insufficient scope for their usual cinematic vision (though the Monte Carlo scenes are prettily sumptuous). Page's central dilemma, meanwhile, is a bit on the trite side--she must choose between love for a young composer and her career under stern taskmaster Boris Lertomov (Anton Walbrook), the ballet company impresario. The climax is also risibly melodramatic, a rare fumble for Powell and Pressburger. That said, The Red Shoes is worth purchasing alone for its middle sequence, a fantasy cinematic setting of the ballet of The Red Shoes, based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale of a girl who dances herself to death. A superb score by Brian Easdale is matched by an impossibly elaborate, shifting backdrop in which all of Powell and Pressburger's sense of drama, colour, invention and the super-real is encapsulated in one small but intensely concentrated dose. While the rest of the film is relatively dispensable, the ballet scene bears up to repeated rewindings.--David Stubbs

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [DVD] [1952] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (15/06/2009) from £8.84  |  Saving you £4.15 (31.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Oscar Wilde's comic jewel sparkles in Anthony Asquith's film adaptation of The Importance of Being Earnest. Featuring brilliantly polished performances by Michael Redgrave Joan Greenwood and Dame Edith Evans the enduringly hilarious story of two young women who think themselves engaged to the same nonexistent man is given the grand Technicolor treatment. Seldom has a classic stage comedy been so engagingly transferred to the screen!

  • The Thin Man [1934] The Thin Man | DVD | (28/06/2013) from £6.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (61.10%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Nick and Nora Charles cordially invite you to bring your own alibi to The Thin Man the jaunty whodunit that made William Powell and Myrna Loy the champagne elite of sleuthing. Bantering in the boudoir enjoying walks with beloved dog Asta or matching each other highball for highball and clue for clue they combined screwball romance with mystery. The resulting triumph nabbed four Academy Award nominations including Best Picture and spawned five sequels. Credit W.S. ""Woody"" Van Dyke for recognizing that Powell and Loy were ideal together and for getting the studio's okay by promising to shoot this splendid adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's novel in three weeks. He took 12 days. They didn't call him ""One-Take Woody"" for nothing!

  • Nativity Combi Pack [Blu-ray + DVD ] Nativity Combi Pack | Blu Ray | (22/11/2010) from £5.39  |  Saving you £17.60 (76.60%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Starring Martin Freeman Ashley Jenson Alan Carr and Mark Wootton comes the ultimate British feel-good Christmas film for the whole family. This Christmas primary school teacher Paul Maddens (Martin Freeman) is being charged with the biggest challenge of his life - mounting the school's musical version of the Nativity. Competing against the posh local school for the honour of best reviewed show in town the stakes are raised when Paul idly boasts that his ex-girlfriend Jennifer (Ashley Jenson) a Hollywood Producer is coming to see his show with a view to turning it into a film. The only trouble is - they haven't spoken in years. With eccentric assistant Mr. Poppy (Mark Wootton) fuelling his 'little white lie' Maddens suddenly finds himself a local celebrity and at the centre of quarrelling parents and over-excited children desperate in their bid for fame and fortune. Now Maddens' only hope is to get back in touch with Jennifer and lure Hollywood to town so that everybody's Christmas wishes come true.

  • Annie Get Your Gun [1950] Annie Get Your Gun | DVD | (09/10/2006) from £3.99  |  Saving you £2.21 (17.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Betty Hutton (as Annie Oakley) and Howard Keel (as Frank Butler) star in this sharpshootin' funfest based on the 1 147-performance Broadway smash boasting Irving Berlin's beloved score including Doin' What Comes Natur'lly I Got the Sun in the Morning and the anthemic There's No Business like Show Business. As produced by Arthur Freed directed by George Sidney and seen and heard in a new digital transfer from restored elements. This lavish spirited production showcases songs and pe

  • It's A Wonderful Life [1946] It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (10/11/2008) from £3.59  |  Saving you £9.97 (55.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Hollywood's best-loved star teams up with America's favourite director to create one of the world's most popular films. It's A Wonderful Life is the ultimate 'feel-good' film. Starring the unforgettable James Stewart as George Bailey the man who receives the greatest Christmas gift of all. A superb ensemble cast includes Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymore this high-spirited Christmas tale is directed by the immortal Frank Capra and ranks as an all-time favourite of fans and critics alike. It's A Wonderful Life began as a short Christmas tale called 'The Greatest Gift'. The premise was simple: A regretful man sees what would have become of his family and friends if he had never lived. Yet various writers struggled to balance the story's pathos and humour. Only Capra's painstaking polishing made the script filmable with enriched characters and plot adding hugely to its depth and drama. When James Stewart first read the script he said 'This is it! When do we start?'

  • Singin' in the Rain [Limited Edition] [DVD] Singin' in the Rain | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £3.59  |  Saving you £-10.49 (-131.30%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Decades before the Hollywood film industry became famous for megabudget disaster and science fiction spectaculars, the studios of Southern California (and particularly Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) were renowned for a uniquely American (and nearly extinct) kind of picture known as The Musical. Indeed, when Sight & Sound conducts its international critics poll in the second year of every decade, this 1952 MGM picture is the American musical that consistently ranks among the 10 best movies ever made. It's not only a great song-and-dance piece starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, and a sprightly Debbie Reynolds; it's also an affectionately funny insider spoof about the film industry's uneasy transition from silent pictures to "talkies". Kelly plays debonair star Don Lockwood, whose leading lady Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen) has a screechy voice hilariously ill-suited to the new technology (and her glamorous screen image). Among the musical highlights: O'Connor's knockout "Make 'Em Laugh"; the big "Broadway Melody" production number; and, best of all, that charming little title ditty in which Kelly makes movie magic on a drenched set with nothing but a few puddles, a lamppost, and an umbrella. --Jim Emerson

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