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  • Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [1977] Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) | Blu Ray | (06/11/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Exiled from their home nations, four strangers from separate corners of the earth agree to undertake a dangerous mission to transport unstable dynamite through the dense jungle of South America in order to earn their passage home. When the slightest bump in the road could equal instant death, the real question is not whether these men will survive this nerve-shredding ordeal but who will they have become if they return at all? After the success of The French Connection and The Exorcist, William Friedkin began work on his biggest project to date. Seizing the moment, he embarked on an ambitious and lengthy shoot in the dense jungles of the Dominican Republic and like Werner Herzog with Fitzcoraldo and Francis Ford Coppola on Apocalypse Now, Friedkin battled the elements, came face-to-face with nature and emerged victorious. Now, 40 years since its release, Sorcerer is regarded by critics and filmmakers alike as a true lost cinematic masterpiece a feat of filmmaking that encapsulates the revolutionary artistry of 1970s American cinema that is a triumph to behold Special Features: Sorcerers A Conversation with William Friedkin and Nicolas Winding Refn (74 mins) The Mystery of Fate A letter from director William Friedkin Newly commissioned artwork to celebrate the 40th Anniversary Reversible sleeve containing the newly commissioned and original theatrical artwork

  • Miss Sloane [DVD] [2017] Miss Sloane | DVD | (18/09/2017) from £8.49  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £8.49

    In the high-stakes world of political power-brokers, Elizabeth Sloane (Jessica Chastain) is the most sought-after and formidable lobbyist in D.C. Known equally for her cunning and her track record of success, she has always done whatever is required to win. But when she takes on the most powerful opponent of her career, she finds that winning may come at too high a price.

  • Miss Sloane [Blu-ray] [2017] Miss Sloane | Blu Ray | (18/09/2017) from £11.48  |  Saving you £3.42 (23.00%)  |  RRP £14.9

    In the high-stakes world of political power-brokers, Elizabeth Sloane (Jessica Chastain) is the most sought-after and formidable lobbyist in D.C. Known equally for her cunning and her track record of success, she has always done whatever is required to win. But when she takes on the most powerful opponent of her career, she finds that winning may come at too high a price.

  • Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer [DVD] [2017] Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer | DVD | (16/10/2017) from £8.91  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Norman Oppenheimer is a small time operator who befriends a young politician at a low point in his life. Three years later, when the politician becomes an influential world leader, Norman's life dramatically changes for better and worse. Click Images to Enlarge

  • Fear In The Night (Doubleplay) [Blu-ray] Fear In The Night (Doubleplay) | Blu Ray | (30/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Peggy (Judy Geeson) is recovering from a nervous breakdown when she is attacked by an unseen assailant. As she struggles to break free, her attacker's artificial arm comes loose and Peggy blacks out in sheer terror. Peggy and her new husband Robert (Ralph Bates) spend their honeymoon at the country school where Robert is a teacher. The school is eerily deserted, except for the headmaster Michael (Peter Cushing) and his wife Molly (Joan Collins). Returningto her cottage, Peggy is once more attacked by a man with one arm. Robert goes to London on behalf of the headmaster, but leaves his shotgun behind to reassure Peggy. Michael visits Peggy at the cottage late at night, and she notices for the first time that he has only one arm. Terrified, she reaches for the gun Fear in the Night was the last, and one of the best, of the suspense thrillers that Hammer produced alongside the better-known Gothic horrors. The film was also the Hammer swansong of director and co-writer Jimmy Sangster, who had joined the company in 1949 and helped create its groundbreaking style. EXTRAS: NEW FEATURETTE - End of Term: Inside Fear in the Night ORIGINAL TRAILER

  • Cardboard Gangsters [DVD] Cardboard Gangsters | DVD | (09/10/2017) from £8.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A group of young cardboard gangsters attempt to gain control of the drug trade in Darndale, chasing the glorified lifestyle of money, power and sex.

  • Cage Dive [DVD] Cage Dive | DVD | (09/10/2017) from £9.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    In this intense thriller, three friends from California head to the rugged Australian coast for a cage-dive encounter with deadly great white sharks. But after attracting a swarm of vicious sharks, their tour boat is destroyed by a massive rogue wave. As clouds gather and darkness descends, the three friends find themselves alone and defenceless, afloat in the chilly ocean as hungry man-eaters begin to circle. With little hope of rescue, they must fight to survive using only their courage.

  • Blood Simple [Blu-ray] Blood Simple | Blu Ray | (30/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The debut film of director Joel Coen and his brother-producer Ethan Coen, 1983's Blood Simple is grisly comic noir that marries the feverish toughness of pulp thrillers with the ghoulishness of even pulpier horror. (Imagine the novels of Jim Thompson somehow fused with the comic tabloid Weird Tales and you get the idea.) The story concerns a Texas bar owner (Dan Hedaya) who hires a seedy private detective (M Emmett Walsh) to follow his cheating wife (Frances McDormand in her first film appearance) and then kill her and her lover (John Getz). The gumshoe turns the tables on his client and suddenly a bad situation gets much, much worse, with some violent goings-on that are as elemental as they are shocking. (A scene in which a character who has been buried alive suddenly emerges from his own grave instantly becomes an archetypal nightmare.) Shot by Barry Sonnenfeld before he became an A-list director in Hollywood, Blood Simple established the hyperreal look and feel of the Coens' productions (undoubtedly inspired a bit by filmmaker Sam Raimi, whose The Evil Dead had just been coedited by Joel). Sections of the film have proved to be an endurance test for art-house movie fans, particularly an extended climax that involves one shock after another but ends with a laugh at the absurdity of criminal ambition. This is definitely one of the triumphs of the 1980s and the American independent film scene in general. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Fragment of Fear [Blu-ray] Fragment of Fear | Blu Ray | (30/10/2017) from £14.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Based on the novel A Fragment of Fear by former M15 spy John Bingham, 7th Baron Clanmorris, this stylish cine-trip from Vanishing Point director Richard C. Sarafian features David Hemmings and Gayle Hunnicutt (then real-life husband and wife) falling into a waking nightmare of murder, mystery and paranoia. INDICATOR LIMITED EDITION SPECIAL FEATURES: High Definition remaster Original mono audio David Kipen on author John Bingham and screenwriter Paul Dehn (2017, tbc mins) Interview with assistant director William P. Cartlidge (2017, tbc mins) Original theatrical trailer Image gallery: on-set and promotional photography New and improved English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing Limited edition exclusive booklet with a new essay by Johnny Mains, an overview of contemporary critical responses, and historic articles on the film World premiere on Blu-ray Limited Edition of 3,000 copies

  • Death On The Nile [Blu-ray] Death On The Nile | Blu Ray | (23/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A visually sumptuous and quintessentially British production, Death on the Nile won an Oscar® for Anthony Powell's costume design and introduced Peter Ustinov in his first portrayal as the Belgian detective Poirot. Abroad a luxury Nile steamer a mystery assassin takes the life of an heiress. EXTRAS Making Of Interview with costume designer Anthony Powell Interview with Dame Angela Lansbury Interview with producer Richard Goodwin Behind the scenes stills gallery Costume designs stills gallery

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [Blu-ray] [1962] The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | Blu Ray | (27/11/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • Evil Under The Sun [DVD] Evil Under The Sun | DVD | (23/10/2017) from £10.64  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A star-studded cast heads this Agatha Christie story of one man's efforts to fathom the mysterious death at a resort hotel in the Mediterranean. Peter Ustinov as Hercule Poirot. Also stars Jane Birkin, Diana Rigg and Maggie Smith. EXTRAS: Making Of Interview with costume designer Anthony Powell Interview with writer Barry Sandler Interview with producer Richard Goodwin Behind the scenes stills gallery Costume designs stills gallery

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1962] The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (27/11/2017) from £10.64  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • A Kind Of Murder [DVD] A Kind Of Murder | DVD | (02/10/2017) from £7.69  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    In 1960s New York, Walter Stackhouse (Patrick Wilson) is a successful architect married to the beautiful Clara (Jessica Biel) who leads a seemingly perfect life. But his fascination with an unsolved murder leads him into a spiral of chaos as he is forced to play cat-and-mouse with a clever killer and an over-ambitious detective, while at the same time lusting after another woman. Click Images to Enlarge

  • Death On The Nile [DVD] Death On The Nile | DVD | (23/10/2017) from £10.64  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A visually sumptuous and quintessentially British production, Death on the Nile won an Oscar® for Anthony Powell's costume design and introduced Peter Ustinov in his first portrayal as the Belgian detective Poirot. Abroad a luxury Nile steamer a mystery assassin takes the life of an heiress. EXTRAS Making Of Interview with costume designer Anthony Powell Interview with Dame Angela Lansbury Interview with producer Richard Goodwin Behind the scenes stills gallery Costume designs stills gallery

  • Evil Under The Sun [Blu-ray] Evil Under The Sun | Blu Ray | (23/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A star-studded cast heads this Agatha Christie story of one man's efforts to fathom the mysterious death at a resort hotel in the Mediterranean. Peter Ustinov as Hercule Poirot. Also stars Jane Birkin, Diana Rigg and Maggie Smith. EXTRAS: Making Of Interview with costume designer Anthony Powell Interview with writer Barry Sandler Interview with producer Richard Goodwin Behind the scenes stills gallery Costume designs stills gallery

  • L.A. Confidential [Blu-ray] L.A. Confidential | Blu Ray | (02/10/2017) from £8.55  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    In a time when it seems that every other movie makes some claim to being a film noir, LA Confidential is the real thing--a gritty, sordid tale of sex, scandal, betrayal and corruption of all sorts (police, political, press--and, of course, very personal) in 1940s Hollywood. The Oscar-winning screenplay is actually based on several titles in James Ellroy's series of chronological thriller novels (including the title volume, The Big Nowhere and White Jazz)--a compelling blend of LA history and pulp fiction that has earned it comparisons to the greatest of all Technicolour noir films, Chinatown. Kim Basinger richly deserved her Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of a conflicted femme fatale; unfortunately, her male costars are so uniformly fine that they may have canceled each other out with the Academy voters: Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kevin Spacey and James Cromwell play LAPD officers of varying stripes. Pearce's character is a particularly intriguing study in Hollywood amorality and ambition, a strait-laced "hero" (and son of a departmental legend) whose career goals outweigh all other moral, ethical and legal considerations. If he's a good guy, it's only because he sees it as the quickest route to a promotion. --Jim Emerson

  • Blood Simple [DVD] Blood Simple | DVD | (30/10/2017) from £10.64  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The debut film of director Joel Coen and his brother-producer Ethan Coen, 1983's Blood Simple is grisly comic noir that marries the feverish toughness of pulp thrillers with the ghoulishness of even pulpier horror. (Imagine the novels of Jim Thompson somehow fused with the comic tabloid Weird Tales and you get the idea.) The story concerns a Texas bar owner (Dan Hedaya) who hires a seedy private detective (M Emmett Walsh) to follow his cheating wife (Frances McDormand in her first film appearance) and then kill her and her lover (John Getz). The gumshoe turns the tables on his client and suddenly a bad situation gets much, much worse, with some violent goings-on that are as elemental as they are shocking. (A scene in which a character who has been buried alive suddenly emerges from his own grave instantly becomes an archetypal nightmare.) Shot by Barry Sonnenfeld before he became an A-list director in Hollywood, Blood Simple established the hyperreal look and feel of the Coens' productions (undoubtedly inspired a bit by filmmaker Sam Raimi, whose The Evil Dead had just been coedited by Joel). Sections of the film have proved to be an endurance test for art-house movie fans, particularly an extended climax that involves one shock after another but ends with a laugh at the absurdity of criminal ambition. This is definitely one of the triumphs of the 1980s and the American independent film scene in general. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • The Mirror Crack'd [Blu-ray] The Mirror Crack'd | Blu Ray | (23/10/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Angela Lansbury stars as supersleuth Miss Marple who sets about solving a mysterious death in the archetypal English village of St. Mary Mead. It features an all star cast including Tony Curtis, Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor. EXTRAS: Interview with writer Barry Sandler Interview with Dame Angela Lansbury Interview with producer Richard Goodwin Behind the scenes stills gallery Storyboard gallery

  • L.A. Confidential [DVD] L.A. Confidential | DVD | (02/10/2017) from £5.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    In a time when it seems that every other movie makes some claim to being a film noir, LA Confidential is the real thing--a gritty, sordid tale of sex, scandal, betrayal and corruption of all sorts (police, political, press--and, of course, very personal) in 1940s Hollywood. The Oscar-winning screenplay is actually based on several titles in James Ellroy's series of chronological thriller novels (including the title volume, The Big Nowhere and White Jazz)--a compelling blend of LA history and pulp fiction that has earned it comparisons to the greatest of all Technicolour noir films, Chinatown. Kim Basinger richly deserved her Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of a conflicted femme fatale; unfortunately, her male costars are so uniformly fine that they may have canceled each other out with the Academy voters: Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kevin Spacey and James Cromwell play LAPD officers of varying stripes. Pearce's character is a particularly intriguing study in Hollywood amorality and ambition, a strait-laced "hero" (and son of a departmental legend) whose career goals outweigh all other moral, ethical and legal considerations. If he's a good guy, it's only because he sees it as the quickest route to a promotion. --Jim Emerson

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