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  • Joe Wicks - Lean in 15: The Transformation Plan [DVD] [2017] Joe Wicks - Lean in 15: The Transformation Plan | DVD | (13/11/2017) from £10.00  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    THE TRANSFORMATION PLAN. 15 minute workouts to transform your body.

  • Shankly: Nature's Fire [DVD] [2017] Shankly: Nature's Fire | DVD | (04/12/2017) from £10.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    A documentary that tells the story of a man, a city and the people's game.

  • Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [1977] Sorcerer (40th Anniversary Collector's Edition) | Blu Ray | (06/11/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Exiled from their home nations, four strangers from separate corners of the earth agree to undertake a dangerous mission to transport unstable dynamite through the dense jungle of South America in order to earn their passage home. When the slightest bump in the road could equal instant death, the real question is not whether these men will survive this nerve-shredding ordeal but who will they have become if they return at all? After the success of The French Connection and The Exorcist, William Friedkin began work on his biggest project to date. Seizing the moment, he embarked on an ambitious and lengthy shoot in the dense jungles of the Dominican Republic and like Werner Herzog with Fitzcoraldo and Francis Ford Coppola on Apocalypse Now, Friedkin battled the elements, came face-to-face with nature and emerged victorious. Now, 40 years since its release, Sorcerer is regarded by critics and filmmakers alike as a true lost cinematic masterpiece a feat of filmmaking that encapsulates the revolutionary artistry of 1970s American cinema that is a triumph to behold Special Features: Sorcerers A Conversation with William Friedkin and Nicolas Winding Refn (74 mins) The Mystery of Fate A letter from director William Friedkin Newly commissioned artwork to celebrate the 40th Anniversary Reversible sleeve containing the newly commissioned and original theatrical artwork

  • Max and Harvey (in a show) [DVD] [2017] Max and Harvey (in a show) | DVD | (30/10/2017) from £12.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Welcome to MAX AND HARVEY (IN A SHOW)! Our lives changed last year when we joined social media and became the UK's biggest Musers. We've had our most epic year yet: Vidcon, Camp Bestival and a mega trip to the U.S.A .. and a TV camera crew have come along for the ride! We can't wait to share it with you! Comes with a pull out poster.

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [Blu-ray] [1962] The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | Blu Ray | (27/11/2017) from £13.30  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1962] The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (27/11/2017) from £10.64  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

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