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  • We Were Soldiers [2002] We Were Soldiers | DVD | (05/11/2007) from £4.09  |  Saving you £8.80 (67.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    In a place soon to be known as 'The Valley of Death' in a small clearing called landing zone X-Ray Lt. Colonel Hal Moore (Mel Gibson) and 400 young troops all from an elite American combat division were surrounded by 2 000 North Vietnamese soldiers. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history...

  • The Lady Vanishes [1938] The Lady Vanishes | DVD | (18/08/2008) from £4.08  |  Saving you £1.91 (31.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Intrigue and espionage and the effects on the lives and futures of passengers aboard a Trans-Continental Express emerge when a girl traveller (Margaret Lockwood) returning from a holiday strikes up an acquaintance with a middle-aged English governess who during the journey mysteriously disappears from her compartment. The girl seeking an explanation for the disappearance is accused of hallucinating and is nearly convinced that her new friend does not exist.

  • Mary Poppins - 45th Anniversary Edition [1964] Mary Poppins - 45th Anniversary Edition | DVD | (02/03/2009) from £6.95  |  Saving you £9.22 (51.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Mary Poppins is one of Disney's most enchanting fantasies and the motion-picture hit that made 'supercalifragilisticexpialidocious' a household word! Julie Andrews stars as the loveable nanny who soars out of the skies and into the hearts of everyone she encounters. Toting a carpetbag full of magical adventures Mary and her fun-loving sidekick Bert (Dick Van Dyke) deliver endless joy and surprises to a troubled family.

  • Trapped [DVD] Trapped | DVD | (24/08/2009) from £6.93  |  Saving you £1.06 (13.30%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Starring Lloyd Bridges Trapped is taut unpretentious film noir directed by Richard Fleischer. The film begins in semi-documentary style explaining the workings of the U.S. Treasury Department and then follows the chain of events set in motion when a forged 20 dollar bill is discovered in California. However it takes a dramatic turn when treasury agents in Washington D.C. recognise the source of the forged bill and travel to a penitentiary in Atlanta to interview forger Tris Stewart (Lloyd Bridges). The agents engineer a fake escape for Stewart so that he can lead them to the source of the forgeries. But Stewart has others ideas and slips his minders.

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [1952] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (30/04/2001) from £19.98  |  Saving you £-9.99 (-100.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    If you're looking for the definitive example of dry wit, look no further than this 1952 version of The Importance of Being Earnest. Of course, it helps to have Oscar Wilde's beloved play as source material, but this exquisite adaptation has a charmed life of its own, with a perfectly matched director and a once-in-a-lifetime cast. Mix these ingredients with Wilde's inimitable repartee, and you've got a comedic soufflé that's cooked to perfection. Opening with a proscenium nod to its theatrical origins, the film turns Wilde's comedy of clever deception and mixed identities into a cinematic treat, and while the 10-member cast is uniformly superb, special credit must be given to Dame Edith Evans, reprising her stage role as the imperiously stuffy Lady Bracknell. To hear her Wilde-ly hilarious inflections and elongated syllables is to witness British comedy in its purest form. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Dracula Has Risen From The Grave [1968] Dracula Has Risen From The Grave | DVD | (28/06/2013) from £16.98  |  Saving you £1.01 (5.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    It took a long time for Hammer's 1958 version of Dracula to turn into a franchise, and it was ten years before Dracula Has Risen From the Grave, the third film in the series, continued where Dracula--Prince of Darkness (1965) left off. The vampire count is accidentally resurrected by the blood of a priest when Monsignor Muller (the excellent Rupert Davies replacing Peter Cushing, whose Professor Van Helsing is absent) exorcises Castle Dracula. The Lord of the Undead soon has the priest under his power, and sets about claiming the Monsignor's niece Maria (Veronica Carlson) as his bride. Maria is in love with Paul (Barry Andrews), more a 60's English "angry young man" than a Victorian hero, yet only he can save the day, the film contrasting his atheism against much Catholicism. Working as a taut, Gothic thriller, the intensity is maintained to a large degree by James Barnard's excellent score and, of course, by Christopher Lee's magnetic interpretation of Count Dracula. The eroticism is stronger than in previous Hammer Draculas, the palpably electric blood-lust marking the movie as a high-point before the series' gradual decline, beginning with Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970). --Gary S. Dalkin

  • It's A Wonderful Life [1946] It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (09/11/2007) from £3.91  |  Saving you £9.47 (52.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

  • The Red Shoes [1948] The Red Shoes | DVD | (01/10/1999) from £16.98  |  Saving you £-6.99 (-70.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Overall, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's 1948 tale of the tragic ballerina Vicky Page (Moira Shearer) is not in the top drawer of their achievements. The backstage wranglings offer insufficient scope for their usual cinematic vision (though the Monte Carlo scenes are prettily sumptuous). Page's central dilemma, meanwhile, is a bit on the trite side--she must choose between love for a young composer and her career under stern taskmaster Boris Lertomov (Anton Walbrook), the ballet company impresario. The climax is also risibly melodramatic, a rare fumble for Powell and Pressburger. That said, The Red Shoes is worth purchasing alone for its middle sequence, a fantasy cinematic setting of the ballet of The Red Shoes, based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale of a girl who dances herself to death. A superb score by Brian Easdale is matched by an impossibly elaborate, shifting backdrop in which all of Powell and Pressburger's sense of drama, colour, invention and the super-real is encapsulated in one small but intensely concentrated dose. While the rest of the film is relatively dispensable, the ballet scene bears up to repeated rewindings.--David Stubbs

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [DVD] [1952] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (15/06/2009) from £8.84  |  Saving you £4.15 (31.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Oscar Wilde's comic jewel sparkles in Anthony Asquith's film adaptation of The Importance of Being Earnest. Featuring brilliantly polished performances by Michael Redgrave Joan Greenwood and Dame Edith Evans the enduringly hilarious story of two young women who think themselves engaged to the same nonexistent man is given the grand Technicolor treatment. Seldom has a classic stage comedy been so engagingly transferred to the screen!

  • The Thin Man [1934] The Thin Man | DVD | (28/06/2013) from £6.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (61.10%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Nick and Nora Charles cordially invite you to bring your own alibi to The Thin Man the jaunty whodunit that made William Powell and Myrna Loy the champagne elite of sleuthing. Bantering in the boudoir enjoying walks with beloved dog Asta or matching each other highball for highball and clue for clue they combined screwball romance with mystery. The resulting triumph nabbed four Academy Award nominations including Best Picture and spawned five sequels. Credit W.S. ""Woody"" Van Dyke for recognizing that Powell and Loy were ideal together and for getting the studio's okay by promising to shoot this splendid adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's novel in three weeks. He took 12 days. They didn't call him ""One-Take Woody"" for nothing!

  • Annie Get Your Gun [1950] Annie Get Your Gun | DVD | (09/10/2006) from £3.95  |  Saving you £1.01 (7.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Betty Hutton (as Annie Oakley) and Howard Keel (as Frank Butler) star in this sharpshootin' funfest based on the 1 147-performance Broadway smash boasting Irving Berlin's beloved score including Doin' What Comes Natur'lly I Got the Sun in the Morning and the anthemic There's No Business like Show Business. As produced by Arthur Freed directed by George Sidney and seen and heard in a new digital transfer from restored elements. This lavish spirited production showcases songs and pe

  • It's A Wonderful Life [1946] It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (10/11/2008) from £3.59  |  Saving you £9.97 (55.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Hollywood's best-loved star teams up with America's favourite director to create one of the world's most popular films. It's A Wonderful Life is the ultimate 'feel-good' film. Starring the unforgettable James Stewart as George Bailey the man who receives the greatest Christmas gift of all. A superb ensemble cast includes Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymore this high-spirited Christmas tale is directed by the immortal Frank Capra and ranks as an all-time favourite of fans and critics alike. It's A Wonderful Life began as a short Christmas tale called 'The Greatest Gift'. The premise was simple: A regretful man sees what would have become of his family and friends if he had never lived. Yet various writers struggled to balance the story's pathos and humour. Only Capra's painstaking polishing made the script filmable with enriched characters and plot adding hugely to its depth and drama. When James Stewart first read the script he said 'This is it! When do we start?'

  • Singin' in the Rain [Limited Edition] [DVD] Singin' in the Rain | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £3.75  |  Saving you £-10.49 (-131.30%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Decades before the Hollywood film industry became famous for megabudget disaster and science fiction spectaculars, the studios of Southern California (and particularly Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) were renowned for a uniquely American (and nearly extinct) kind of picture known as The Musical. Indeed, when Sight & Sound conducts its international critics poll in the second year of every decade, this 1952 MGM picture is the American musical that consistently ranks among the 10 best movies ever made. It's not only a great song-and-dance piece starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, and a sprightly Debbie Reynolds; it's also an affectionately funny insider spoof about the film industry's uneasy transition from silent pictures to "talkies". Kelly plays debonair star Don Lockwood, whose leading lady Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen) has a screechy voice hilariously ill-suited to the new technology (and her glamorous screen image). Among the musical highlights: O'Connor's knockout "Make 'Em Laugh"; the big "Broadway Melody" production number; and, best of all, that charming little title ditty in which Kelly makes movie magic on a drenched set with nothing but a few puddles, a lamppost, and an umbrella. --Jim Emerson

  • An American In Paris [1951] An American In Paris | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £8.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (30.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Gene Kelly stars as Jerry Mulligan a carefree young artist in post-WW II Paris. In her spectacular film debut Leslie Caron is Lise Bourvier a lonely French shopgirl engaged to marry a successful entertainer unless jerry can convince her otherwise! From their first on-screen meeting to the spectacular ballet finale Kelly and Caron are superb. And in his role as Jerry's best friend pianist Oscar Levant keeps the action lively with his droll humor and acid wit.

  • Laura [1944] Laura | DVD | (23/04/2007) from £6.29  |  Saving you £6.70 (51.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    ""The story of a love that became the most fearful thing that ever happened to a woman!"" A Detective investigating the murder of a movie star starts to fall in love with her whilst piecing together her last moments.

  • Letters from Iwo Jima (2 Disc Special Edition) Letters from Iwo Jima (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (09/07/2007) from £3.73  |  Saving you £18.25 (76.10%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Critically hailed as an instant classic, Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima is a masterwork of uncommon humanity and a harrowing, unforgettable indictment of the horrors of war. In an unprecedented demonstration of worldly citizenship, Eastwood (from a spare, tightly focused screenplay by first-time screenwriter Iris Yamashita) has crafted a truly Japanese film, with Japanese dialogue (with subtitles) and filmed in a contemplative Japanese style, serving as both complement and counterpoint to Eastwood's previously released companion film Flags of Our Fathers. Where the earlier film employed a complex non-linear structure and epic-scale production values to dramatise one of the bloodiest battles of World War II and its traumatic impact on American soldiers, Letters reveals the battle of Iwo Jima from the tunnel- and cave-dwelling perspective of the Japanese, hopelessly outnumbered, deprived of reinforcements, and doomed to die in inevitable defeat. While maintaining many of the traditions of the conventional war drama, Eastwood extends his sympathetic touch to humanise "the enemy," revealing the internal and external conflicts of soldiers and officers alike, forced by circumstance to sacrifice themselves or defend their honour against insurmountable odds. From the weary reluctance of a young recruit named Saigo (Kazunari Ninomiya) to the dignified yet desperately anguished strategy of Japanese commander Tadamichi Kuribayashi (played by Oscar-nominated The Last Samurai costar Ken Watanabe), whose letters home inspired the film's title and present-day framing device, Letters from Iwo Jima (which conveys the bleakness of battle through a near-total absence of colour) steadfastly avoids the glorification of war while paying honorable tribute to ill-fated men who can only dream of the comforts of home. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [1952] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (08/10/1999) from £12.74  |  Saving you £-2.75 (-27.50%)  |  RRP £9.99

    If you're looking for the definitive example of dry wit, look no further than this 1952 version of The Importance of Being Earnest. Of course, it helps to have Oscar Wilde's beloved play as source material, but this exquisite adaptation has a charmed life of its own, with a perfectly matched director and a once-in-a-lifetime cast. Mix these ingredients with Wilde's inimitable repartee, and you've got a comedic soufflé that's cooked to perfection. Opening with a proscenium nod to its theatrical origins, the film turns Wilde's comedy of clever deception and mixed identities into a cinematic treat, and while the 10-member cast is uniformly superb, special credit must be given to Dame Edith Evans, reprising her stage role as the imperiously stuffy Lady Bracknell. To hear her Wilde-ly hilarious inflections and elongated syllables is to witness British comedy in its purest form. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Flags of our Fathers (2 Disc Special Edition) Flags of our Fathers (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (09/07/2007) from £2.94  |  Saving you £19.26 (80.30%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Thematically ambitious and emotionally complex, Clint Eastwood's Flags of Our Fathers is an intimate epic with much to say about war and the nature of heroism in America. Based on the non-fiction bestseller by James Bradley (with Ron Powers), and adapted by Million Dollar Baby screenwriter Paul Haggis (Jarhead screenwriter William Broyles Jr. wrote an earlier draft that was abandoned when Eastwood signed on to direct), this isn't so much a conventional war movie as it is a thought-provoking meditation on our collective need for heroes, even at the expense of those we deem heroic. In telling the story of the six men (five Marines, one Navy medic) who raised the American flag of victory on the battle-ravaged Japanese island of Iwo Jima on February 23rd, 1945, Eastwood takes us deep into the horror of war (in painstakingly authentic Iwo Jima battle scenes) while emphasizing how three of the surviving flag-raisers (played by Adam Beach, Ryan Phillippe, and Jesse Bradford) became reluctant celebrities - and resentful pawns in a wartime publicity campaign - after their flag-raising was immortalized by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal in the most famous photograph in military history. As the surviving flag-raisers reluctantly play their public roles as "the heroes of Iwo Jima" during an exhausting (but clearly necessary) wartime bond rally tour, Flags of Our Fathers evolves into a pointed study of battlefield valor and misplaced idolatry, incorporating subtle comment on the bogus nature of celebrity, the trauma of battle, and the true meaning of heroism in wartime. Wisely avoiding any direct parallels to contemporary history, Eastwood allows us to draw our own conclusions about the Iwo Jima flag-raisers and how their postwar histories (both noble and tragic) simultaneously illustrate the hazards of exploited celebrity and society's genuine need for admirable role models during times of national crisis. Flags of Our Fathers defies the expectations of those seeking a more straightforward war-action drama, but it's richly satisfying, impeccably crafted film that manages to be genuinely patriotic (in celebrating the camaraderie of soldiers in battle) while dramatising the ultimate futility of war. Eastwood's follow-up film, Letters from Iwo Jima, examines the Iwo Jima conflict from the Japanese perspective. --Jeff Shannon

  • Singin' In The Rain [1952] Singin' In The Rain | DVD | (09/10/2006) from £4.98  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Starring Gene Kelly Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds and featuring unforgettable song and dance classics like 'Singin' in the Rain' 'Make 'Em Laugh' and 'All I Do Is Dream of You' it has ""just about everything you could ask for in a movie musical"" Sunday Review. Set in Hollywood in the roaring 20s co-starring Jean Hagen and the incomparable Cyd Charisse and featuring a spectacular 12-minute 'Broadway Ballet' finale it is indisputably ""the most enjoyable of all American mo

  • Casablanca (2 Disc Special Edition) [1942] Casablanca (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (07/08/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Casablanca: easy to enter but much harder to leave especially if your name is on the Nazis' most wanted list. Atop that list is Czech resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid) whose only hope is Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) a cynical American who sticks his neck out for no one especially Victor's wife Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) the ex-lover who broke his heart. So when Ilsa offers herself in exchange for Laszlo's safe transport out of the country the bitter Rick must decide what's more important - his own happiness or the countless lives that hang in the balance...

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