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  • Trapped [DVD] Trapped | DVD | (24/08/2009) from £6.93  |  Saving you £1.06 (13.30%)  |  RRP £7.99

    Starring Lloyd Bridges Trapped is taut unpretentious film noir directed by Richard Fleischer. The film begins in semi-documentary style explaining the workings of the U.S. Treasury Department and then follows the chain of events set in motion when a forged 20 dollar bill is discovered in California. However it takes a dramatic turn when treasury agents in Washington D.C. recognise the source of the forged bill and travel to a penitentiary in Atlanta to interview forger Tris Stewart (Lloyd Bridges). The agents engineer a fake escape for Stewart so that he can lead them to the source of the forgeries. But Stewart has others ideas and slips his minders.

  • Letters from Iwo Jima (2 Disc Special Edition) Letters from Iwo Jima (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (09/07/2007) from £3.73  |  Saving you £18.25 (76.10%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Critically hailed as an instant classic, Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima is a masterwork of uncommon humanity and a harrowing, unforgettable indictment of the horrors of war. In an unprecedented demonstration of worldly citizenship, Eastwood (from a spare, tightly focused screenplay by first-time screenwriter Iris Yamashita) has crafted a truly Japanese film, with Japanese dialogue (with subtitles) and filmed in a contemplative Japanese style, serving as both complement and counterpoint to Eastwood's previously released companion film Flags of Our Fathers. Where the earlier film employed a complex non-linear structure and epic-scale production values to dramatise one of the bloodiest battles of World War II and its traumatic impact on American soldiers, Letters reveals the battle of Iwo Jima from the tunnel- and cave-dwelling perspective of the Japanese, hopelessly outnumbered, deprived of reinforcements, and doomed to die in inevitable defeat. While maintaining many of the traditions of the conventional war drama, Eastwood extends his sympathetic touch to humanise "the enemy," revealing the internal and external conflicts of soldiers and officers alike, forced by circumstance to sacrifice themselves or defend their honour against insurmountable odds. From the weary reluctance of a young recruit named Saigo (Kazunari Ninomiya) to the dignified yet desperately anguished strategy of Japanese commander Tadamichi Kuribayashi (played by Oscar-nominated The Last Samurai costar Ken Watanabe), whose letters home inspired the film's title and present-day framing device, Letters from Iwo Jima (which conveys the bleakness of battle through a near-total absence of colour) steadfastly avoids the glorification of war while paying honorable tribute to ill-fated men who can only dream of the comforts of home. --Jeff Shannon

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