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  • Italian Job/Zulu/Alfie (Triple Pack) [DVD] Italian Job/Zulu/Alfie (Triple Pack) | DVD | (14/11/2011) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The Italian Job:Charlie Croker is out of jail and on the make with an ingenious plan for the heist of the century. Aided and abetted by top criminal mastermind Mr. Bridger, Charlie sets off with an ace team of villains and three very special minis to lift $4,000,000 from under the noses of the Turin Polizi. The trouble is, with the cops and the Mafia on his tail, Charlie finds that grabbing the money is kid's stuff compared to getting away with it... This action packed comedy drama is an all time cult classic of the 60's, with the craziest car chase in movie history and an incredible cliff hanger finale, The Italian Job is the caper movie to beat them all!Zulu:The year: 1879. The place: Natal, Africa. One British garrison has already fallen to a huge army of Zulu tribesmen. The fearless native warriors are now heading for the isolated colonial outpost of Rorke's Drift, which is manned by no more than a hundred South Wales Borderers.A stirring tale of courage under fire, Zulu boasts fine performances from Michael Caine and Stanley Baker as conflicting British officers, and an unforgettable rendition of Men of Harlech.Alfie:Michael Caine stars as Alfie, a Cockney Casanova, in this outstanding example of 1960s British filmmaking.Alfie is a good-looking charmer, who finds that the Swinging Sixties are a great time to be around in. He's always able to sweet-talk women into bed, and he just doesn't care about the consequences. The film charts Alfie's complex and amoral amour, while he offers his own perspective, addressing the camera with his observations on life and love.So what's it all about, Alfie?

  • Funny Girl / Funny Lady [1968] Funny Girl / Funny Lady | DVD | (04/03/2002) from £4.99  |  Saving you £20.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Like giant monuments to good old-fashioned star quality, Funny Girl (1968) and Funny Lady (1975) hark back to the golden days of American vaudeville, while essentially celebrating one of the great, egotistical show-business talents of all time. Viewed end to end, these two films, which tell the story of Ziegfeld comedienne Fanny Brice, run for almost five hours. That's a lot of biopic. But with the greatest of respect to Brice, undoubtedly a formidable star of her time, the talent really in the spotlight here belongs to Barbra Streisand. Streisand created the role of Fanny Brice in the 1964 Broadway stage musical and her performance for the big screen is a tour de force, fully deserving the Best Actress Oscar which she received. As a biopic, Funny Girl is superior fare, full of sumptuous production numbers. Brice's glory days are explored against the background of her turbulent private life with her flawed playboy husband Nicky Arnstein (a sympathetic performance from Omar Sharif) with considerable attention to the details of her inner turmoil. More rambling and less cohesive, Funny Lady finds Fanny divorced but still in love with Arnstein (Sharif also revisiting his role), drifting into marriage number two with uncouth songwriter and impresario Billy Rose (the excellent James Caan), her successful career again juxtaposed with a less than happy personal life. Combined, both films measure Streisand's rise to greatness. In Funny Girl, the bravura of the performance as a whole masks occasional gaucheness, while if Funny Lady is the less impressive picture overall, it still marks how far she has developed as a screen actress. The rough edges are gone, replaced by a sophisticated poise and the sense of a talent that has come to terms with itself. And of course throughout she is superb in the musical numbers, which include her theme song "People" and the classic belter "Don't Rain on my Parade", as well as Brice's classic torch song, "My Man". On the DVD: this package of tremendous, old-fashioned entertainment takes the viewer back to pre-multiplex days when going to the cinema was an event you might dress up for. Funny Lady's soundtrack includes a pre-picture "Overture" to give you time to unwrap the chocolates. You really need some plush velvet curtains to swing back across the television screen. Then, guaranteeing a twinge of nostalgia, there's an intermission break. Both films are presented in their original widescreen 2.35:1 aspect ratio. Dolby Digital 5.0 (Funny Girl) and LCR (Funny Lady) soundtracks do justice to Streisand's lung power. The first disc offers the most interesting extras, including a couple of featurettes about Streisand. Both discs provide standard filmographies and song highlights so Streisand addicts can skip between numbers to their hearts' content.--Piers Ford

  • The Razor's Edge [DVD] [1946] The Razor's Edge | DVD | (02/07/2012) from £4.99  |  Saving you £5.00 (50.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    A adventuresome young man goes off to find himself and loses his socialite fiance in the process. But when he returns 10 years later, she will stop at nothing to get him back, even though she is already married.

  • All About Eve [1950] All About Eve | DVD | (18/02/2002) from £3.85  |  Saving you £8.00 (61.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Alfred Hitchcock famously observed that movies should be more than just picture postcards of people talking. Sometimes, though, dialogue is all that's needed. Joseph L. Mankiewicz's immaculately scripted All About Eve is a case in point. There are no special effects (unless one considers Marilyn Monroe's wiggle or a scene in which a car breaks down). What the movie offers instead is some of the most coruscating one-liners ever committed to celluloid. The top-name cast certainly know how to put Mankiewicz's words across. Anne Baxter is all doe-eyed charm as Eve, the ruthless aspiring actress who passes herself off as a little girl lost. George Sanders (eminent character actor and the voice of Shere Khan the tiger in The Jungle Book) shows his customary mellowness of sneer as Addison De Witt, theatre critic and professional cynic ("a venomous foot louse" as he's characterised) who helps push Eve up the greasy pole toward success, if not happiness. Best of all is Bette Davis, a soured but still resplendent stage diva, who takes Eve under her wing. ("I'll admit I've seen better days but I'm still not to be had for the price of a cocktail--like a salted peanut", she tells her lover.) The plotting and double-dealing on the screen, described in Sam Staggs' All About All About Eve: The Complete Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Bitchiest Film Ever Made, were matched by what went on behind the scenes. Davis heartily loathed fellow actress Celeste Holm who--ironically enough--plays her best friend. She fell in love with another co-star, the handsome, good-looking Gary Merrill, whom she later married. Backstage dramas are often self-indulgent and stagy affairs, but this one dazzles. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • Classic Films Triple - A Night To Remember/Caesar And Cleopatra Classic Films Triple - A Night To Remember/Caesar And Cleopatra | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (61.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A Night To Remember: On April 10th 1912 RMS Titanic sailed from Southampton on her maiden voyage. On her fourth night at sea she struck and iceberg and sank with the loss of 1 500 passengers and crew. The film faithfully depicts the drama heroism and horror of the night the unsinkable sank. The Red Shoes: The tragic and romantic story of Vicky Page the brilliant young dancer who must give up everything if she is to become a great ballerina is one of Powell and Pressburger's most famous films. Creators of classics such as Black Narcissus A Matter of Life And Death and The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp they were renowned for their use of brilliant colour and wonderful costumes and with the exhilarating cinematography of Jack Cardiff were among the most influential film makers of their time. The Red Shoes is one of the finest examples of their work and has become an inspiration to artists film makers and musicians all over the world. Caesar And Cleopatra: Vivien Leigh is the young Cleopatra and Claude Rains is Julius Caesar in the spectacular 1945 version of George Bernard Shaw's Caesar and Cleopatra. As Rome invades Egypt Julius Caesar (Rains) stumbles across the young and unrefined princess Cleopatra (Leigh) sheltering in the Sphinx. Impressed by her spirit and intelligence seduced by her charm he determines to make her Queen. Cleopatra learns about power and politics at the feet of a master but her downfall begins when she is seduced by Mark Antony. This witty brilliantly designed movie features a memorable cast including Stewart Granger Flora Robson Stanley Holloway and a very young Jean Simmons as a harpist. Caesar and Cleopatra was the most expensive movie made in Britain at the time with director Gabriel Pascal even using sand from Egypt to get the right cinematic colour.

  • Mickey Rooney Collection Mickey Rooney Collection | DVD | (14/04/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £-1.00 (-25.10%)  |  RRP £3.99

    The Mickey Rooney Collection (3 Discs)

  • Second Chorus Second Chorus | DVD | (02/02/2009) from £2.04  |  Saving you £0.95 (31.80%)  |  RRP £2.99

    A marvelously delightful 1930's style song and dance spectacular the likes of which would be wiped away by the December bombing of Pearl Harbor Second Chorus finds Fred Astaire as a struggling bandleader chased by a collection agent - Paulette. She serves the papers he chases her. She wangles him an audition with Artie Shaw which Burgess Meredith hilariously sabotages. A rich sugar daddy (the marvelous Charles Butterworth) smoothes things over with Artie and through it all Fred and Paulette dance and sing. For what more could you ask?

  • Dracula (1931)/House of Dracula/Dracula Dracula (1931)/House of Dracula/Dracula | DVD | (09/04/2007) from £3.33  |  Saving you £11.66 (77.80%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Dracula (1931 & 1999 version with new soundtrack by Phillip Glass) : Although there have been numerous screen versions of Bram Stoker's classic tale none is more enduring than this 1931 original. Towering ominously among the shadows of the Carpathian Mountains Castle Dracula strikes fear in the hearts of the Transylvanian villagers below... Illuminated by the haunting presence of Bela Lugosi as the Count Tod Browning's direction makes full use of crisp black and white cinem

  • The Mummy [1932] - Special Edition The Mummy - Special Edition | DVD | (21/07/2008) from £2.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (70.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Boris Karloff's legendary performance has become a landmark in the annals of screen history. As the mummy Im-Ho-Tep he is accidentally revived after 3 700 years by a team of British archaeologists. It is revealed in a flashback that he was a high priest embalmed alive for trying to revive the vestal virgin whom he loved after she had been sacrificed. Alive again he sets out to find his lost love.

  • Flags of our Fathers (2 Disc Special Edition) Flags of our Fathers (2 Disc Special Edition) | DVD | (09/07/2007) from £3.12  |  Saving you £19.26 (80.30%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Thematically ambitious and emotionally complex, Clint Eastwood's Flags of Our Fathers is an intimate epic with much to say about war and the nature of heroism in America. Based on the non-fiction bestseller by James Bradley (with Ron Powers), and adapted by Million Dollar Baby screenwriter Paul Haggis (Jarhead screenwriter William Broyles Jr. wrote an earlier draft that was abandoned when Eastwood signed on to direct), this isn't so much a conventional war movie as it is a thought-provoking meditation on our collective need for heroes, even at the expense of those we deem heroic. In telling the story of the six men (five Marines, one Navy medic) who raised the American flag of victory on the battle-ravaged Japanese island of Iwo Jima on February 23rd, 1945, Eastwood takes us deep into the horror of war (in painstakingly authentic Iwo Jima battle scenes) while emphasizing how three of the surviving flag-raisers (played by Adam Beach, Ryan Phillippe, and Jesse Bradford) became reluctant celebrities - and resentful pawns in a wartime publicity campaign - after their flag-raising was immortalized by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal in the most famous photograph in military history. As the surviving flag-raisers reluctantly play their public roles as "the heroes of Iwo Jima" during an exhausting (but clearly necessary) wartime bond rally tour, Flags of Our Fathers evolves into a pointed study of battlefield valor and misplaced idolatry, incorporating subtle comment on the bogus nature of celebrity, the trauma of battle, and the true meaning of heroism in wartime. Wisely avoiding any direct parallels to contemporary history, Eastwood allows us to draw our own conclusions about the Iwo Jima flag-raisers and how their postwar histories (both noble and tragic) simultaneously illustrate the hazards of exploited celebrity and society's genuine need for admirable role models during times of national crisis. Flags of Our Fathers defies the expectations of those seeking a more straightforward war-action drama, but it's richly satisfying, impeccably crafted film that manages to be genuinely patriotic (in celebrating the camaraderie of soldiers in battle) while dramatising the ultimate futility of war. Eastwood's follow-up film, Letters from Iwo Jima, examines the Iwo Jima conflict from the Japanese perspective. --Jeff Shannon

  • John Barrymore Collection John Barrymore Collection | DVD | (14/04/2008) from £4.14  |  Saving you £-0.15 (-3.80%)  |  RRP £3.99

    The John Barrymore Collection (3 Discs)

  • Burgess Meredith Collection Burgess Meredith Collection | DVD | (14/04/2008) from £4.94  |  Saving you £-0.95 (-23.80%)  |  RRP £3.99

    Titles comprise: Man On The Eiffel Tower (1949): A criminal genius orchestrates a complex game of murder ensnaring everyone around him in his web of deceit. After a wealthy American is murdered a poor street vendor found with blood on his hands is the obvious suspect. Inspector Maigret discerns that there is more to the story and begins to decipher hidden clues buried beneath the surface. When the detective and the mastermind come face to face they engage in a thrilling battle of wills. The killer leads the police on a furious chase through the streets and rooftops of Paris lashing out as the noose grows tighter around him. Winterset (1936): A young man returns to New York City 15 years after his father was tried and executed for a murder he did not commit. His search to find the real killers brings him to the slums of the city where he falls in love with a young girl Marianne and uncovers the truth he's been searching for his entire life. Adapted from the Broadway play by Maxwell Anderson and nominated for two Academy Award Winterset is a moody journey into the dark arms of malice murder and retribution. A rain-drenched testament to the tortured human condition. Second Chorus (1941): A marvelously delightful 1930's style song and dance spectacular the likes of which would be wiped away by the December bombing of Pearl Harbor Second Chorus finds Fred Astaire as a struggling bandleader chased by a collection agent (Paulette Goddard). She serves the papers he chases her. She wangles him an audition with Artie Shaw which Burgess Meredith hilariously sabotages. A rich sugar daddy (the marvelous Charles Butterworth) smoothes things over with Artie and through it all Fred and Paulette dance and sing. For what more could you ask?

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