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  • The Sound Of Music [1965] The Sound Of Music | DVD | (08/03/2004) from £5.49  |  Saving you £10.50 (65.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The most widely seen movie produced by a Hollywood studio, The Sound of Music grows fresher with each viewing. Though it was planned meticulously in pre-production (save for the scene where Maria and the children take a dipping in an Austrian lake that nearly cost a life), on each viewing one is struck anew by the spontaneous almost improvisatory air of the acting, notably of Julie Andrews under Robert Wise's direction. There are also the little human touches he brings to, for instance, the scene where Maria leads the children to the hills, over bridges and along tow paths where the smallest boy trips up and momentarily gets left behind: it creates a feeling that most of us have encountered. From the opening pre-credit sequence of muted excitement as the camera roves over the Austrian Alps (photographed in magnificent colour), where little phrases from the wind instruments on the soundtrack are flung as if on the breeze, foreshadowing the title song to follow, the production never puts a foot wrong. On the DVD: On the first disc the film itself has never looked or sounded better since its original presentation in Todd AO (prints of which are said to have disappeared forever). The disc also contains a separate audio guide that takes the viewer through the film sequence by sequence, with director Robert Wise commenting on the weather, the production design by Boris Leven, the sequences filmed on location and in Hollywood (like the interiors of the Von Trapp villa), and the naming of other actors who were eager for the lead roles, notably Doris Day and Yul Brynner. On the second disc there are the documentaries. "Salzburg Sight and Sound" was Charmian Carr's own record of her time on location in the summer of 1964, playing Liesl, the eldest Von Trapp daughter. "From Fact to Fiction", running two hours, begins with the birth of Maria in 1905 who inspired the film, charts her subsequent marriage to Captain Von Trapp, their escape from Nazi Germany not across the Alps but via a train across the Italian boarder, their home in Vermont and thence to the German film of the family that was brought to the attention of Rodgers and Hammerstein as an ideal vehicle for a stage musical. A second group of documentaries covers previews, television and radio commercials and a 1973 interview with Wise and Andrews. Overall, this is a marathon package but in its way is as compelling as the film itself. --Adrian Edwards

  • My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration [Blu-ray] [1964] My Fair Lady: 50th Anniversary Restoration | Blu Ray | (11/07/2016) from £8.00  |  Saving you £11.99 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    More lovely than ever! Restored in 4K from 8K scans of original 65 mm elements with 96K resolution English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD audio, this 50th ANNIVERSARY EDITION celebrates the breathtaking musical extravaganza that won 8 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. This beloved adaptation of the Broadway stage hit stars AUDREY HEPBURN as Eliza Doolittle, a sassy, working-class London street vendor, and REX HARRISON as the elitist Professor Higgins, who attempts to turn Eliza into a sophisticated lady through proper tutoring. But, when the humble flower girl blossoms into the toast of London society, her teacher may have a lesson or two to learn himself

  • The Quiet Man [DVD] [1952] The Quiet Man | DVD | (03/06/2013) from £5.05  |  Saving you £4.94 (49.40%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton

  • Whatever Happened To Baby Jane? [Blu-ray] [1962] [Region Free] Whatever Happened To Baby Jane? | Blu Ray | (04/11/2013) from £7.30  |  Saving you £10.69 (59.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Blackly comic psychodrama from director Robert Altman starring screen legends Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Jane Hudson (Davis) found fame as child star 'Baby Jane', only to be eclipsed by her sister Blanche (Crawford) when the latter became a Hollywood glamour girl in the 1930s. Blanche's career was brought to an abrupt end by an accident for which Jane was seemingly responsible. Now the two ageing sisters live together in their Hollywood mansion, attended by their maid, Elvira (Maidie Norm...

  • The Third Man [DVD] [1949] The Third Man | DVD | (20/07/2015) from £8.48  |  Saving you £9.51 (52.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

    THE THIRD MAN has been beautifully restored in 4K for the first time showcasing the genius of this celebrated British noir voted the ‘The greatest British film of all time’ by a British Film Institute poll. Holly Martins (Joseph Cotton Citizen Kane ) a naïve writer of pulp westerns arrives in Vienna to meet his old friend Harry Lime (the incomparable Orson Welles) nut finds that Lime has apparently been killed in a suspicious accident. Martins too curious for his own good hears contradictory stories about the circumstances of Limes death and as witnesses disappear he finds himself chased by unknown assailants. Complicating matters are the sardonic Major Calloway (Trevor Howard Brief Encounter) head of the British forces and Lime’s stage actress mistress Anna Schmidt (Alida Valli). Will Martin’s curiosity lead him to discover things about his old friend that he’d rather not know? Brilliantly scripted by Graham Greene and set to Anton Karas’ evocative zither score this justly celebrated classic is further enhanced by Robert Karasker’s Academy Award winning cinematography and Orson Welles in one of his most iconic screen roles. Extras: Feature Audio Commentary Famous Fan Featurette Restoring the Third Man Interview & Zither Performance by Cornelia Mayer Guardian Interview Cotton (audio) Guardian Interview Greene (audio) Joseph Cotton’s Alternative Opening (Audio) Shadowing The Third Man Dangerous Edge Third Man on Radio (Audio) Trailer

  • The Robe [DVD] [1953] The Robe | DVD | (12/03/2012) from £5.89  |  Saving you £4.10 (41.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The Robe was designed by 20th Century-Fox to show off the wonders of CinemaScope, and taken simply as a vehicle for widescreen photography the movie is undeniably a visual treat. Perhaps the clumsy early 'Scope cameras were partly to blame, but from any other perspective--plot, dialogue and acting--The Robe is a flat, overly reverential and turgid piece of film making. Richard Burton is the Roman Centurion on duty at Christ's crucifixion who bets on and wins Jesus' robe, then spends the rest of the movie agonising about becoming a Christian. Victor Mature is his sanctimonious slave Demetrius. So confident were the producers of box-office success that they commissioned the sequel, Demetrius and the Gladiators, even before The Robe had been released. --Mark Walker

  • Billy Liar - 50th Anniversary Edition [DVD] [1963] Billy Liar - 50th Anniversary Edition | DVD | (06/05/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Billy Liar was the multimedia phenomenon of its era. Starting out as a novel by Yorkshire writer Keith Waterhouse, it rapidly became a long-running stage play, adapted by Waterhouse with playwright Willis Hall, which lead to the movie, scripted by Waterhouse and Hall for John Schlesinger to direct, then a stage musical and finally a spin-off TV series. Do you get the feeling it caught the mood of the times? The basic set-up owes a lot to James Thurber's classic short story The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. Our hero, Billy Fisher, lives at home in a Bradford semi with his nagging parents and works as a lowly clerk in an undertaker's parlour. But, in his imagination he lives a rich and varied fantasy life as gallant military leader, suave socialite, best-selling novelist and so forth. Trouble is, he can't always keep fantasy and reality apart, any more than he can the keep two girls he's engaged to separate. Not to mention his other problems?. Schlesinger's direction brings out the desperation behind the comedy, and Tom Courtenay, at once defiant and hangdog, slips perfectly into the role created on stage by Albert Finney. But the whole cast's a joy, not least the great Leonard Rossiter as undertaker Mr Shadrach, Billy's saturnine boss. And then there's Julie Christie--the luminous spirit of the Swinging 60s--in her first starring role as the girl who offers Billy a chance of real escape. At the end, when she takes the train to London, away from the smoke and the grimness "oop" north, the whole British New Wave went with her. On the DVD: just the theatrical trailer which is a fairly crass affair. There's been no remastering, it seems, but both sound and vision are clean enough and the print preserves the original's full 2.35:1 widescreen ratio. --Philip Kemp

  • Hobson's Choice [DVD] Hobson's Choice | DVD | (05/05/2014) from £8.98  |  Saving you £9.01 (50.10%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Henry Horatio Hobson (Academy Award -Winner Charles Laughton) is the owner of a well-established boot shop in nineteenth century Salford Lancashire and the father of three daughters. The oldest Maggie (Brenda De Banzie) shoulders both home and business responsibilities while Hobson whiles the time away at the local pub. The younger sisters are both being courted by neighbours but Hobson refuses to give the couples settlements. Maggie becomes tired of his oafish behaviour and decides to take matters into her hands by seeking a husband. Much to the hilarity and consternation of her father aged spinster Maggie sets her sights on shy Will Mossop (John Mills) Hobson's master boot-maker. Mossop is at first stunned by the suggestion but eventually agrees to Maggie's authoritative persuasion and together they set up a rival boot shop. A timeless masterpiece that marked a temporary return to David Lean's period adaptations of Dickens (Great Expectations Oliver Twist). The film went on to win multiple awards. This film has been digitally restored to its former glory. Special Features: New and exclusive interviews with Prunella Scales and screenwriter Norman Spencer

  • Witness for the Prosecution [DVD] [1957] Witness for the Prosecution | DVD | (11/02/2013) from £5.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (40.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and Charles Laughton star in this brilliantly made courtroom drama (Film Daily) that left audiences reeling from its surprise twists and shocking climax. Directed by Billy Wilder, scripted by Wilder and Harry Kurnitz, and based on Agatha Christie's hit London play, this splendid, six-time Oscar-nominated classic crackles with emotional electricity (The New York Times) and continues to keep movie lovers riveted until the final, mesmerizing frame. When a wealthy widow is found murdered, her married suitor, Leonard Vole (Power), is accused of the crime. Vole's only hope for acquittal is the testimony of his wife (Dietrich)...but his airtight alibi shatters when she reveals some shocking secrets of her own!

  • Vertigo [Blu-ray] [1958] [Region Free] Vertigo | Blu Ray | (23/09/2013) from £7.99  |  Saving you £7.00 (46.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    Dreamlike and nightmarishly surreal, Vertigo is Hitchcock's most personal film because it confronts many of the convoluted psychological issues that haunted and fascinated the director. The psychological complexity and the stark truthfulness of their rampant emotions keeps these strangely obsessive characters alive on screen, and Hitchcock understood better than most their barely repressed sexual compulsions, their fascination with death and their almost overwhelming desire for transcendent love. James Stewart finds profound and disturbing new depths in his psyche as Scotty, the tortured acrophobic detective on the trail of a suicidal woman apparently possessed by the ghost of someone long dead. Kim Novak is the classical Hitchcockian blonde whose icy exterior conceals a churning, volcanic emotional core. The agonised romance of Bernard Herrmann's score accompanies the two actors as a third and vitally important character, moving the film along to its culmination in an ecstasy of Wagnerian tragedy. Of course Hitch lavished especial care on every aspect of the production, from designer Edith Head's costumes (he, like Scotty, was most insistent on the grey dress), to the specific colour scheme of each location, to the famous reverse zoom "Vertigo" effect (much imitated, never bettered). The result is Hitch's greatest work and an undisputed landmark of cinema history. On the DVD: This disc presents the superb restored print of this film in a wonderful widescreen (1.85:1) anamorphic transfer, with remastered Dolby digital soundtrack. There's a half-hour documentary made in 1996 about the painstaking two-year restoration process, plus an informative commentary from the restorers Robert Harris and James Katz, who are joined by original producer Herbert Coleman. There are also text features on the production, cast and crew, plus a trailer for the theatrical release of the restoration. This is an undeniably essential requirement for every DVD collection. --Mark Walker

  • Cleopatra [DVD] [1963] Cleopatra | DVD | (13/05/2013) from £6.89  |  Saving you £6.10 (47.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Still the most expensive movie ever made, Cleopatra nearly bankrupted 20th Century Fox. It also scandalised the world with the very public affair of its two major stars, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. But Joseph L Mankiewicz's 1963 epic deserves to be remembered for more than its off-screen troubles. An extravagantly elaborate production, the sets and costumes alone are awe-inspiring; Mankiewicz's own literate screenplay draws heavily on the classics and Shakespeare; while the supporting cast, led by Rex Harrison as Caesar and Roddy McDowall as his nephew (and future emperor) Octavian, are all first-rate thespians and generally put in more convincing performances than either of the two leads. Mankiewicz's original intention was to make two three-hour films: the first being Caesar and Cleopatra, the second Antony and Cleopatra. But before the film?s completion, and following a boardroom coup worthy of Ancient Rome itself, legendary mogul Darryl F Zanuck took back control of Fox and insisted that Cleopatra be cut to a more economical length. A heartbroken Mankiewicz was forced to trim his six-hour vision down to four. This was the "roadshow" version shown at the film?s premiere and now restored here. Then following adverse criticism and pressure from cinema chains Zanuck demanded more cuts, and the final released version ran a mere three hours--half the original length. Capitalising on the feverish publicity surrounding Burton and Taylor, the shortened version played up both their on- and off-screen romance. This longer four-hour roadshow version allows for a broader view of the film, adding some depth to the politics and manipulation of the characters. But the director?s original six-hour edit has been lost. Perhaps one day it will be rediscovered in the vaults and Mankiewicz?s much-maligned movie will finally be seen the way it was meant to be. Until then, Cleopatra remains an epic curiosity rather than the complete spectacle it should be.

  • Dracula [Blu-ray] [1979] [Region Free] Dracula | Blu Ray | (06/10/2014) from £8.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Chalk this one up as something that seemed like a good idea at the time. Frank Langella had just taken Broadway by storm in a revival of the play based on Bram Stoker's classic vampire novel. He was tall, elegant, and almost painfully romantic--all qualities that failed to translate to this garish, tarted-up film version. The story remains the same, if told in greater length than in Bela Lugosi's version. The film even offered Laurence Olivier as vampire-hunter Van Helsing (in one of several roles he played during the period that required a middle-European accent) and a young Kate Nelligan as the woman whose love (and blood) Dracula most wants. But director John Badham, working from W.D. Richter's clunky script, makes a hash of most of it, relying on special effects to do the heavy lifting. --Marshall Fine

  • Summer Holiday [1963] Summer Holiday | DVD | (26/02/2007) from £7.48  |  Saving you £5.51 (42.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    From the First Kiss to the Last Blush It's the Craziest Riot On Wheels! Borrowing a double-decker bus for a mobile home four young mechanics search for fun in the sun from London to Athens. Bachelor Boy Cliff Richard dons his dancing shoes and brings a beat to the beach in the breeziest Summer Holiday on record!

  • Battle of Britain [Blu-ray] Battle of Britain | Blu Ray | (01/01/2009) from £7.99  |  Saving you £11.99 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.98

    This is a spectacular retelling of a true story that shows courage at its inspiring best. Few defining moments can change the outcome of war; but when the outnumbered Royal Air Force defied unsurmountable odds in engaging the German Luftwaffe they may well have altered the course of history!

  • The Ghost and Mrs. Muir [DVD] [1947] The Ghost and Mrs. Muir | DVD | (09/04/2012) from £5.99  |  Saving you £4.00 (40.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Joseph Mankiewicz's moody classic is less ghost story than romantic fantasy, a handsome 1947 drama of impossible love. Independent young widow Lucy Muir (the luminous Gene Tierney), desperate to escape her uptight in-laws, falls in love with a grand seaside house and moves in, only to discover the cantankerous ghost of the hot-tempered Captain Gregg (a histrionically flamboyant performance by Rex Harrison). Lucy refuses to let the bombastic captain frighten her away, earning his respect, his friendship, and later his love. They team up to turn the captain's salty memoirs into a bestseller, but as his affection grows he fades away, leaving Lucy free to undertake a more worldly suitor, notably a charismatic children's author (George Sanders at his smarmy smoothest) with his own guarded secret. Charles Lang's melancholy black-and-white photography and Bernard Herrmann's haunting score set the tone for this sublime adult drama, and Tierney delivers one of her most understated performances as the resolute Mrs. Muir. Mankiewicz turns this ghost story into a refreshingly mature and down-to-earth romance. --Sean Axmaker

  • Westworld - 40th Anniversary Edition [Blu-ray] [1974] [Region Free] Westworld - 40th Anniversary Edition | Blu Ray | (27/10/2014) from £7.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (55.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Welcome to Delos, the high-tech Disneyland for adults that Michael Crichton created for Westworld, a nifty science fiction thriller from 1973 that also marked the popular novelist's feature-film directorial debut. The movie is so named because the vacationing buddies who travel to Delos (James Brolin, Richard Benjamin) choose Westworld as their destination (the other choices being Roman World and Medieval World), where they are free to indulge their movie-inspired fantasies of the Wild West). The place is populated by perfectly humanlike robots programmed and monitored to cater to every guest's fancy, from brothel beauties to black-hatted gunslingers (such as the villain played by Yul Brynner). But fun turns into abject horror when the robots--particularly Brynner's villain--begin to malfunction and Delos turns into an amusement park that's anything but amusing. Westworld has moments of camp and the look of a low-budget back-lot production, but two decades before Crichton revamped his idea to create Jurassic Park, this movie made the most of its interesting and exciting premise. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Doctor Who - Attack of the Cybermen Doctor Who - Attack of the Cybermen | DVD | (16/03/2009) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The TARDIS is lured to Earth in 1985 by a distress call sent by Lytton who has made contact with a group of Cybermen based in London's sewers. The Doctor and Peri are then captured and forced to take Lytton and the Cybermen in the TARDIS to the Cybermen's home planet Telos. The Cybermen have stolen a time vessel from another race and plan to change history by crashing Halley's Comet into Earth and obliterating it before it can bring about the demise of their original home world Mondas in 1986.

  • The Inn of the Sixth Happiness [DVD] [1958] The Inn of the Sixth Happiness | DVD | (05/11/2012) from £6.79  |  Saving you £3.20 (32.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    An epic and extraordinary true story--or, at least, an extraordinary story based on a novel (Alan Burgess's The Small Woman) based on a true story. Gladys Aylward (an improbably mesmerizing Ingrid Bergman) is a British would-be missionary with an obsession about China. As she has no experience, the Missionary Society won't let her go, but she goes anyway, alone, to a remote northern province. She is hated, then loved; finally she becomes both a significant political figure and the heroine of a miraculous escape in which she shepherds 100 children to safety across the mountains just ahead of a Japanese invasion. Curt Jurgens is suitably stony as Lin Nan, the half-Dutch, half-Chinese military officer who falls in love with her, and a visibly ailing Robert Donat (who died before this, his final film, was released) is the wily local mandarin who sees and makes use of her extraordinary abilities. Directed by Mark Robson, The Inn of the Sixth Happiness is a sweeping, stirring tearjerker, a big tale told in a big landscape with acres of orchestrated strings by Malcolm Arnold. A beautiful and beautifully made film that's a classic of the "everyone said I couldn't but I did it anyway" genre. --Richard Farr

  • Doctor Who - The Deadly Assassin [DVD] Doctor Who - The Deadly Assassin | DVD | (11/05/2009) from £6.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Doctor arrives on Gallifrey where he is accused of the assassination of the Time Lord President. Investigating with the aid of Co-ordinator Engin and Castellan Spandrell he discovers that this is part of a plot hatched by his old adversary the Master. Having used up all twelve of his regenerations the Master is now a wizened husk. He is seeking to control the presidency in order to obtain the official regalia the Sash and Rod of Rassilon which are really keys to the Eye of Harmony the source of all the Time Lords' power.

  • Kind Hearts And Coronets [DVD] [1949] Kind Hearts And Coronets | DVD | (05/09/2011) from £8.98  |  Saving you £7.01 (43.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Set in the stately Edwardian era Kind Hearts And Coronets is black comedy at is best with the most articulate and literate of all Ealing screenplays. Sir Alec Guinness gives a virtuoso performance in his Ealing comedy debut playing all eight victims standing between a mass-murderer and his family fortune. Considered by some to be Ealing's most perfect achievement of all the Ealing films.

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