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  • Doctor Dolittle 2 [2001] Doctor Dolittle 2 | DVD | (26/11/2001) from £2.50  |  Saving you £17.04 (85.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    It's only a marginal improvement, but Dr Dolittle 2 defies the odds by rising above its popular 1998 predecessor (and once again, let's not confuse these movies with the earlier Rex Harrison musical). Eddie Murphy plays the title role with ease and with the confident professionalism of a comedian who knows when to share the spotlight--especially when he's being upstaged by a bunch of animals who steal all the punch lines. And once again the film is aimed at a pre-teen audience: so many of those punch lines involve flatulence, bodily functions and frequent use of the word "butt". The difference this time is that Dr Dolittle has settled into his talk-to-the-animals routine; his 16-year-old daughter (Raven-Symone) is getting to be a feisty handful (it turns out she's coping with a hereditary gift); and his lawyer wife (Kristen Wilson) is representing him in a trial against corporate villains who want to clear-cut a local forest. Naturally, the local critter mafia (their Don is a beaver... fugeddaboutit!) want Dolittle to fight for their cause, and this involves the successful mating of an endangered bear and a domesticated circus bear who's forgotten all the bear necessities of life in the wild. The bears are voiced by Lisa Kudrow and Steve Zahn and they almost steal the show, but the whole menagerie (with digitally animated "talking") is equally amusing. Adults might wish that the filmmakers had tried harder to make a truly memorable sequel, but this is a movie for kids, and they're going to love it without quibbling. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Just My Luck Just My Luck | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £2.67  |  Saving you £12.10 (75.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Everything changed in the blink of an eye... Lindsay Lohan is a Manhattan socialite who's never had anything but the best of luck -that is until she kisses the unluckiest man on Earth (Chris Pine) at a masquerade ball and their fortunes swap...

  • Carry On Camping [1968] Carry On Camping | DVD | (07/07/2003) from £4.69  |  Saving you £8.30 (63.90%)  |  RRP £12.99

    There are three periods to Carry On. Early on, they were typical British light comedy capers, hardly risqué. By the 1970s, the loveable double-entendres had been replaced by an almost nasty sleaziness, culminating in 1977's Carry On Emanuelle. 1969's Carry On Camping, thankfully, belongs to the Golden Years. Pretty much everybody is present and correct, if not politically. Sid James is a likely-ish, if slightly elderly lad, persuading Joan Sims to join him at what he secretly expects to be a nudist colony. Terry Scott is a put-upon suburbian, coerced into outdoor vacations by his ghastly, horsey-laughed wife, while Charles Hawtrey is the campest of campers who befriends them. Kenneth Williams, who alone makes this worth watching, is gloriously ridiculous as head of a girl's school, Chayste Place, with Hattie Jacques as Matron and Barbara Windsor as one of the 30 year old fifth formers in their charge. Technically it's terrible stuff, with Barbara Windsor's flying bra, laboured puns galore, peeping tomfoolery, punchlines visible two miles off, "comedy" incidental music and a reactionary denouement in which they chase off a bunch of hippies. Yet if you don't chuckle at least half a dozen times during this, however many times you've seen it, there's probably something wrong with you. --David Stubbs

  • Perfect Catch Perfect Catch | DVD | (13/02/2006) from £4.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (73.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    A Comedy About The Game Of Love. According to Red Sox super-fan Ben Wrightman (Jimmy Fallon) finding romance is about as unlikely as his beloved team winning it all. But when Ben scores a beautiful new girlfriend named Lindsey (Drew Barrymore) suddenly anything is possible. That is until the baseball season begins and Lindsey finds herself competing with an entire baseball team - the Boston Red Sox - for her boyfriend's heart and soul. Will Ben's obsession with the Sox put

  • Old Dogs [DVD] [2009] Old Dogs | DVD | (02/08/2010) from £4.19  |  Saving you £7.80 (65.10%)  |  RRP £11.99

    Who says you can't teach Old Dogs new tricks? Robin Williams and John Travolta are the old, single "dogs" in question, reveling in great chemistry as lifelong pals who've together grown a successful marketing empire--but who have somehow managed to avoid ever really growing up. The cast, featuring Travolta's real wife, Kelly Preston (who, with costar Rita Wilson, reveals just how fine a comedian she is, and how the screen really sparkles when she's on it), and his real-life daughter Ella Bleu, is top-notch. Other great performances include Bernie Mac, a sultry Lori Loughlin, Matt Dillon, and a dynamite Seth Green as a mini-mogul in training. The plot revolves around the Old Dogs suddenly needing to care for twin 7-year-olds (the heretofore unknown children of Williams's character, Dan) and finding that they learn as much from the kids as vice versa. Moans Dan to Travolta's Charlie, after awkwardly tucking in the kids for the night at Charlie's bachelor pad, "I just shook hands goodnight with my daughter." Old Dogs is a fun family film that's appropriate for ages 8 and up, with enough jokes and great timing to please grownups too. --A.T. Hurley

  • Raising Helen [2004] Raising Helen | DVD | (27/12/2004) from £4.39  |  Saving you £11.60 (72.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The hit-making director of Runaway Bride and Pretty Woman (Garry Marshall) now brings you another hilarious all-star comedy! Sexy Kate Hudson (Almost Famous) is Helen Harris a glamorous big-city fashion executive whose life of late nights and bright lights is turned upside down when she's unexpectedly named guardian of her sister's three troublesome kids! A fun-filled movie treat featuring Joan Cusack (In & Out) John Corbett (My Big Fat Greek Wedding) and Helen Mirren (Calendar Gi

  • Cheaper By The Dozen 2 [2005] Cheaper By The Dozen 2 | DVD | (03/04/2006) from £4.89  |  Saving you £11.10 (69.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Steve Martin is funnier than ever in this hilarious sequel! Tom Baker (Steve Martin) and wife Kate (Bonnie Hunt) bring their clan together for a memorable summer getaway. But their dream vacation turns into an outrageous competition with the overachieving overzealous family of Tom's long-time rival Jimmy Murtaugh (Eugene Levy). Featuring all the original Baker kids including Hilary Duff Tom Welling and Piper Perabo this super-sized comedy is fun for the whole family!

  • Evolution [2001] Evolution | DVD | (26/11/2001) from £2.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Based on the evidence in Evolution, one thing is perfectly clear: special effects have evolved, but director Ivan Reitman has reverted to primitive pandering. Equally obvious is the fact that Evolution is a defacto rip-off of Reitman's 1984 classic Ghostbusters, but this time there's no Bill Murray to deliver the best punch lines (we have to settle for fellow ghostbuster Dan Aykroyd in a broad supporting role) and the comedy has devolved into a gross-fest including deep-rectal extraction of alien insects, fire-hose enemas into a giant alien sphincter, and a full-moon display of David Duchovny's naked posterior. Whereas Ghostbusters was a shrewd, irreverent mainstream comedy that combined gooey spectral ectoplasm with something resembling genuine wit, Evolution is a crude, juvenile romp in which all things slimy are elevated to comedic supremacy. Granted, that's not always a bad thing. As latter-day Ghostbusters equivalents, Duchovny, Orlando Jones and Seann William Scott make a fine comedic trio, and Julianne Moore is equally amusing as a clumsy scientist and Duchovny's obligatory love interest. Despite the meddling of clueless military buffoons, they join forces to eradicate a wild variety of rapidly evolving alien creatures that arrived on Earth via meteor impact, and the extraterrestrial beasties (courtesy of effects wizard Phil Tippet and crew) are outrageously designed and marvellously convincing. For anyone who prefers lowbrow humour, Evolution will prove as entertaining as Ghostbusters (or at least Galaxy Quest), while others may lament Reitman's shameless embrace of crudeness. One thing's for certain: after seeing this film, you'll gain a whole new appreciation for Head & Shoulders shampoo. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com On the DVD: Evolution's special effects and CGI are seamless and crystal clear in anamorphic widescreen with some of the "creatures" looking more realistic than the actors. This is a movie with quite a few set pieces, but none show off the Dolby 5.1 soundtrack better than the dragon attack in the mall, connect up a couple of speakers and you can hear the flap of leathery wings behind your couch. In terms of extras there's a making-of documentary from HBO called The Evolution of Evolution, hosted by Orlando Jones, in which he interviews his co-stars (most of whom seem to ignore him) and the director Ivan Reitman. You also get the behind-scenes track on the special effects and art direction. Other than that you get the theatrical trailer, the teaser trailer and the original trailer for Ghostbusters, which adds a touch classic 80s' memorabilia. --Kristen Bowditch

  • Bewitched [2005] Bewitched | DVD | (06/02/2006) from £3.59  |  Saving you £16.40 (82.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Director Nora Ephron breathes new life into the classic TV show Bewitched in this romantic comedy of the same name.

  • The Kid [2000] The Kid | DVD | (10/09/2001) from £4.39  |  Saving you £11.60 (72.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    In Disney's The Kid Bruce Willis takes a holiday from his tough-guy roles to play Russ Duritz, a grouchy PR consultant who has lost touch with his inner child and spends his days bullying his secretary and being mean to his sweet-tempered girlfriend (Emily Mortimer). Then a rather podgy child appears who turns out to be Russ himself, eight years old, newly arrived by a trick of time-travel never really explained. In the course of some amusing scenes the boy persuades Russ of the error of his ways, so that by the end he even likes dogs (hating them being an infallible sign of a bad character). Willis shows, not for the first time (remember his early TV series Moonlighting?), that he has a gift for comedy and it's a pleasant hour and a half; though there are few really big laughs, kids of all ages will probably like it. --Edward Buscombe

  • Monte Carlo [DVD] Monte Carlo | DVD | (04/06/2012) from £3.89  |  Saving you £9.10 (70.10%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A graduation trip to Paris and a case of mistaken identity coincide to give three Texan girls an overseas adventure they'll never forget. Friends Grace (Selena Gomez) and Emma (Katie Cassidy) are going on a trip to Paris to celebrate Grace's graduation, but find themselves saddled with Emma's soon-to-be stepsister Meg (Leighton Meester), who's just about as different from Emma and Grace as is humanly possible. The trip starts out rushed and much less glamorous than the girls anticipated, but when Grace is mistaken for British heiress Cordelia Winthrop Scott, the girls suddenly find themselves in the lap of luxury and wind up at a charity event in Monte Carlo. Along the way, each of the girls meets a boy who helps them to mature and discover what's truly important in their lives. This movie has essentially been done before (think The Lizzie McGuire Movie and Cheetah Girls 2), and even with the star power of Gomez, this rendition pales in comparison. Throw in the unlikely pairing of Cassidy and Gomez as friends and contemporaries despite their significant age difference, and the abrupt personality switch that Meester's character undergoes, and the whole film comes off as pretty unbelievable to those over 12-years-old. However, tweens are likely to find the characters and situation enticing enough, especially when combined with the draw of Disney Channel icon Gomez, to earn the film a passing score. (Ages 10 to 12) --Tami Horiuchi

  • Josie And The Pussycats [2001] Josie And The Pussycats | DVD | (17/12/2001) from £4.96  |  Saving you £12.75 (70.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Shrewdly concocted by codirectors Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan, Josie and the Pussycats is a wildly comedic update of the Archie comic book (and early 1970s cartoon show). "Oh my God, I'm a trend pimp!" cries rocker Josie McCoy (Rachel Leigh Cook) when she discovers that she and her best friends Melody (Tara Reid) and Val (Rosario Dawson)--collectively known as the Pussycats--have been recruited in a plot to brainwash America's youth into a frenzy of mindless consumerism. Unbeknown to the Pussycats, subliminal messages in their chart-topping hit "Pretend to Be Nice" are forcing kids to follow the latest prefab trends as if their lives depended on it. Josie's going to be the "Next Big Thing", and to her manager (Alan Cumming) and Megarecords mogul Fiona (Parker Posey), the other Pussycats are expendable baggage in their scheme to dictate the cool quotient of teenagers everywhere. Blatant product placements dominate virtually every colourful scene as Josie and the Pussycats gamely embraces the cultural blight it claims to criticise, but this isn't Hollywood hypocrisy. In this deliriously entertaining assault on pop-cultural flotsam, with its disposable boy-band (aptly named "Du Jour") and cross-product marketing ploys that perpetuate blind conformity among gullible teens, Elfont and Kaplan wilfully bite the hand that feeds them, and they're having loads of fun while advocating independent opinion. Cook and her pals are more honestly sexy than Britney Spears, and they make genuinely catchy music (although Cook's vocals were dubbed). It's pure fluff, but Josie and the Pussycats was conceived in such high spirits that it's hard to imagine how it could be improved. Even the obligatory end-credit outtakes are utterly irresistible. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com On the DVD: Some nicely designed and colourful menus lead you to the extras. The obligatory "Behind the Scenes" is a lot more than just an extended promo with footage of the Pussycats learning their instruments and playing them live on stage. Strangely enough though, there's not one mention throughout of the characters' comic book and cartoon origins. There are a few pointless deleted scenes and the usual production notes plus the video for Josie and the Pussycats' single "Three Small Words" (good enough to play on MTV!) and two hilarious music videos from the movie's fictitious boy band DuJour. --Jon Weir

  • See Spot Run [2001] See Spot Run | DVD | (18/02/2002) from £3.89  |  Saving you £10.10 (72.20%)  |  RRP £13.99

    A family film for an era when "family film" means scatological jokes, gratuitous violence, and shapeless storytelling, See Spot Run is about par for the course. Punctuated by many a lowbrow moment (scenes of combustible zebra flatulence, for instance), Spot has trouble staying true to its major storyline despite the latter's redeeming qualities. That story concerns an FBI-trained bull mastiff who flees the wrath of a mobster (Paul Sorvino) and ends up in the care of a pooch-averse postman (David Arquette) and the latter's little neighbour (Angus T Jones). With a nutball like Arquette in the lead (and vigorous support work from comic Anthony Anderson of Me, Myself, and Irene), the antics come fast and furious, including a wild bit of slapstick in which Arquette simultaneously gets his head stuck in a fishbowl and his body densely wrapped in helium-inflated plastic. On the other hand, there's a touching simplicity to the relationship between man and canine, each of whom has been terribly lonely in his own way. Sure, the filmmakers went for some cheap laughs, but there is much else here that is harder earned. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Osmosis Jones [2001] Osmosis Jones | DVD | (18/03/2002) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £13.99

    After the stiff attempts at realism in many recent features, it's a treat to see broad cartoon-style animation on the big screen in Osmosis Jones, a spoof of cop movies set inside the human body. The title character (voice by Chris Rock) is a street-smart white blood cell, working for Frank's immune system. He and Drix (David Hyde Pierce), an over-the-counter cold capsule, are reluctant partners fighting what appears to be a minor infection. Osmosis discovers Frank has really contracted a fatal virus, Thrax (Laurence Fishburne): he battles a corrupt body politic led by a venal mayor (William Shatner) to save Frank's life and win the affection of the mayor's aide, Leah (Brandy Norwood). Rock's motor-mouth delivery can get annoying, but it contrasts nicely with straight arrow Drix (imagine a fussy Buzz Lightyear). Excellent drawing and a powerful vocal performance make Thrax a genuinely frightening villain. Osmosis Jones is about two-thirds animation and one-third live action, which is why two-thirds of the film is entertaining and funny, and one-third is not. The life Osmosis and Drix save belongs to Frank, a slob played in live-action sequences by Bill Murray, who's undercut rather than supported by Chris Elliott and Molly Shannon. Shamelessly over-the-top performances make the human characters seem flatter than the two-dimensional cartoons. The live action was shot by the Farrelly brothers and features lots of gross-out gags about zits, flatulence, vomit, etc. The audience endures these leaden segments, waiting to get back to the animation--and the real comedy. Suitable for ages 9 and up: profanity, violence, bodily function jokes. --Charles Solomon, Amazon.com

  • Son Of The Mask [2005] Son Of The Mask | DVD | (06/06/2005) from £2.61  |  Saving you £17.38 (86.90%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Son of the Mask is a frantic sequel tailor-made for short attention spans. For 86 manic minutes, this belated follow-up to 1994's Jim Carrey hit The Mask compensates for Carrey's absence by casting Jamie Kennedy as a cut-rate animator who becomes heavily animated himself (courtesy of non-stop computer-animated effects) when he dons the ancient mask that belongs to Loki (Alan Cumming, nicely cast), the Norse god of mischief. As in the Carrey film, the mask turns its wearers into cartoonish whirlwinds of confident bluster, and that includes a little dog named Otis, and especially Kennedy's mask-induced offspring, a frenetic shape-shifting baby that's more creepy than comedic, like Ally McBeal's dancing infant on steroids and speed. This woebegone sequel quickly vanished from theaters, but it's a harmless babysitter that kids will enjoy, from the director of the similarly effects-driven Cats & Dogs. --Jeff Shannon

  • Cheaper By The Dozen [2004] Cheaper By The Dozen | DVD | (31/05/2004) from £4.00  |  Saving you £11.25 (70.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Steve Martin and Bonnie Hunt corral a wild herd of rampaging children in Cheaper by the Dozen, an enjoyable family flick. When Kate Baker (Hunt) gets a book deal for her chronicle of their abundant family life, she also gets drawn into a book tour--leaving Tom (Martin) to run the house and cope with his new, high-pressure job as a football coach. Naturally, chaos erupts, bringing the family to the brink of meltdown. Cheaper by the Dozen is not a great movie or an important movie or even a surprising movie, but it is a warm-hearted crowd-pleaser. The Bakers' family life is a bit idealised and antiseptic, but anyone looking for an escape from their own less-ideal family lives won't mind. Also featuring Tom Welling, Hilary Duff, Piper Perabo and an uncredited Ashton Kutcher. --Bret Fetzer

  • Snow Day [2000] Snow Day | DVD | (05/11/2001) from £9.99  |  Saving you £-3.98 (-30.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Nickelodeon Movies presents this family comedy concerning a day in the life of the Brandstons a bumbling Syracuse family whose town falls victim to a sudden snowstorm. While Dad Tom (Chevy Chase) a struggling meteorologist battles with his producer (David Alan Grier) over whether wearing outrageous outfits will boost his ratings his 10-year-old daughter Natalie (Zena Grey) forges a bitter battle with the local snowplow driver (the hilarious Chris Elliott). His menacing snow

  • Pink Panther [2006] Pink Panther | DVD | (17/07/2006) from £2.99  |  Saving you £14.46 (72.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Pink Panther diamond is missing.... And the world's greatest detective is solving the case one mistake at a time. In this modern remake of the beloved 1964 comedy classic Steve Martin re-invents the role of Inspector Clouseau a man with limited deductive powers a frightening command of the English language and a downright dangerous investigative approach! A world-famous soccer coach has been murdered his stunning Pink Panther diamond has been stolen and his pop star

  • Big Fat Liar [2002] Big Fat Liar | DVD | (30/01/2013) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Pitting kids against grown-ups has always been a reliable source of comedy, and Big Fat Liar indulges the "smart kid vs dumb adult" fantasy with infectious enthusiasm. In this case it's Frankie Muniz from TV's Malcolm in the Middle, playing a Michigan eighth-grader whose penchant for lying results in parental scorn when he claims that a Hollywood movie mogul (ace character actor Paul Giamatti) has stolen the kid's hastily written English essay and turned it into his upcoming summer blockbuster. The kid only wants to prove his honesty and recruits his girlfriend (spunky TV star Amanda Bynes) to beat the honcho on his Hollywood turf. Elaborate practical jokes and slapstick gags turn this kid stuff (scripted and produced by two former child stars) into an enjoyable send-up of Hollywood absurdity. When combined with Giamatti's mastery of slow-burning megalomania, the show-biz in-jokes and Home Alone-style anarchy make this a harmless diversion for the young and young-at-heart. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy [Blu-ray] [2005] The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy | Blu Ray | (19/03/2007) from £6.85  |  Saving you £17.14 (71.40%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Don't panic... Mere seconds before the Earth is to be demolished by an alien construction crew English everyman Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman) is swept off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect (Mos Def) who is actually not human but an alien researcher penning a new edition of the essential travel tome known as The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. Landing aboard a spaceship from the Vogon Constructor Fleet which has just obliterated the Earth Arthur is flung into an outer space adventure where he'll meet oddball characters like Slartibartfast Zaphod Beeblebrox & Marvin the paranoid android visit amazing places such as Magrathea endure the 3rd worst poetry in the galaxy discover mice want his brain and learn that the answer to life the universe and everything is well 42... Following incarnations as a radio series a set of books which became known as a 'Trilogy In Five Parts' and a TV adaptation Douglas Adams' seminal science fiction comedy blasts onto DVD as a fantastically funny film co-written by the author himself prior to his death. The film features a galaxy of British and American stars also including the voices of Alan Rickman as Marvin and Stephen Fry as the Guide.

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