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  • National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation [1989] National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation | DVD | (24/11/2003) from £3.79  |  Saving you £10.20 (72.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation is the third instalment of the Griswold family saga and a significant improvement over their previous European Vacation. Disaster-prone dad (Chevy Chase) discovers just how dangerous the Christmas season really is as the Griswolds' old-fashioned holiday celebration turns out to be more "Bah! Humbug!" than Christmas cheer. Chase is right at home with the outrageous slapstick and often cheerfully tasteless humour, and John Hughes's script is stuffed full of classic Christmas movie references, but Randy Quaid practically steals the film as the unemployed relative with his malicious grin and mooching lifestyle. Not exactly a holiday classic and a bit spotty, this gag-filled comedy is just obnoxious enough for the Scrooge lurking inside everyone. And fear not, a happy ending awaits all. Watch for future star Juliette Lewis as Chase's teenage daughter. --Sean Axmaker

  • Romesh Ranganathan [DVD] [2016] Romesh Ranganathan | DVD | (21/11/2016) from £4.44  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The BAFTA nominated star of Asian Provocateur releases Irrational, his first ever live stand-up show. his ability to produce bitingly fresh gags marks him out from the crowd. The Guardian

  • Brassed Off Brassed Off | DVD | (17/09/2007) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    It's 1992 and the miners of Grimley Colliery are facing uncertainty. Not only is their pit under threat but the Grimley Colliery Band is on the verge of breaking up - that is until Gloria (Tara Fitzgerald) arrives. As the only female member of the band she somehow manages to rekindle their enthusiasm for the forthcoming National Championship as well as rekindling a childhood romance with Andy (Ewan McGregor).

  • Arsenic And Old Lace [1944] Arsenic And Old Lace | DVD | (07/05/2001) from £4.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (64.30%)  |  RRP £13.99

    In 1941, when Frank Capra filmed Arsenic and Old Lace, he was in the midst of his string of social-concern pictures. So this uncharacteristic property must have seemed like a vacation; it's a straight farce, played at full tilt and closely adapted from the Broadway play. Almost all of the action takes place on a single set: the old home of the Brewster sisters (Josephine Hull and Jean Adair), those dear, dotty old ladies who mix up a very special elderberry wine. Very special. As their nephew Mortimer (Cary Grant) discovers on the eve of his wedding, the two ladies have been spiking the wine with poison and sending lonely gentleman callers off to the great beyond. More specifically, they've been burying them in the cellar with the help of nutty Uncle Teddy, who thinks he's Teddy Roosevelt (and thus digging the Panama Canal down in the basement). The ominous happenings are made more sinister with the arrival of another menacing relative (RaymondMassey) and his quack doctor (Peter Lorre), who look and act like refugees from a horror movie. Played completely over the top, this movie offers up lots of bracing slapstick, with Grant run to near exhaustion by the galloping insanity of his family. Although Capra shot the film in 1941, prior to his making military films during World War II, the film was not released until 1944; the contract stipulated that the movie not come out before the play ended its enormously successful run. --Robert Horton

  • Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie [DVD] Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie | DVD | (27/10/2014) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Mrs. Brown's foray into film is a rip-roaring comic romp set in the streets of Dublin starring Brendan O'Carroll and his family. When market-trader Agnes Brown finds her stall under threat from a ruthless developer she and her family embark on a campaign to save their livelihood aided only by a motley troop comprising Buster's blind trainee ninjas a barrister with an unhelpful affliction and Grandad's elderly friends. As daughter Cathy turns her back on the family business and unwanted secrets emerge from Agnes's past could the Brown matriarch finally be out of her depth? It's sink or swim for Agnes in Mrs. Brown's Boys D'Movie.

  • Seven Psychopaths [DVD] Seven Psychopaths | DVD | (15/04/2013) from £3.89  |  Saving you £14.10 (78.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    From Academy Award winning writer and director Martin McDonagh comes a star studded blood-drenched black comedy. Marty (Colin Farrell) is a struggling writer who dreams of finishing his screenplay ‘Seven Psychopaths’. All he needs is a little focus and inspiration. Charlie (Woody Harrelson) is the psychotic gangster who has just had his beloved dog stolen by Marty’s oddball friends (Sam Rockwell and Christopher Walken). Unpredictable and extremely violent Charlie is prepared to kill anyone associated with the theft giving Marty all the focus and inspiration he needs to finish his script. Just as long as he lives to tell the tale...

  • Paul [DVD] Paul | DVD | (26/03/2012) from £2.99  |  Saving you £17.00 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Everything you know about aliens from pop culture is true. At least that's the message from Paul, a swift, sharp, and very funny movie from the creative minds that also brought us Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, Superbad, and Adventureland. The British stars of the first two, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, also wrote the snappy screenplay, and director Greg Mottola shows that he can make human and sentimental both the slapstick and the subtle, self-referential humour the same way he did in Superbad and Adventureland. The premise Pegg and Frost have laid out for themselves as likable, sci-fi fanatic supernerds is a dream vacation starting at Comic Con, then continuing through the American Southwest in an RV visiting historic UFO sites like Area 51, the Black Mailbox, and Roswell, and finishing up at Devil's Tower in Wyoming, the iconic centerpiece from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. After their inauspicious start, they happen upon an escaped alien who is 4 feet tall, and has the big head, classic diamond eyes, and features we've come to recognize as both the benevolent and evil kinds of space aliens from movies and TV. He is also the titular character, and as voiced by Seth Rogen, this CGI creature spouts a never-ending string of wisecracks, insider secrets, and frat-boy humour that comes loud and clear as classic Rogen in tone and attitude. As an aside and terrific example of the very clever throwaway punch lines that run throughout, there's a brief flashback to 1980 showing Paul on a conference call with Steven Spielberg (really), giving him advice about script development issues for E.T. Paul crash-landed in the late 1940s and has been held prisoner by the government's men in black. They've not only been pumping him for knowledge, they've also leaked the fabric and features of his being to people who want to believe, especially the ones in Hollywood. Now Paul wants to go home, and he's found the perfect getaway with the want-to-believe team of Graeme (Pegg) and Clive (Frost), who take him to his rendezvous (at Devil's Tower, of course). The road movie that unfolds is consistently hilarious, moving nimbly through one-off gags and inside jokes, but also creating larger relationships and drawn-out humour that relies on us believing that the little CGI Paul is real. And mostly we do, again thanks to Rogen's delivery and distinctive vocalizing. Paul constantly quips, makes fun, gets drunk, smokes dope, and spouts a steady stream of patter about how aliens have been bowdlerized and reimagined in entertainment and the minds of people like Graeme and Clive. There's a jam-packed supporting cast that complements and complicates the story (in a good way), including Bill Hader and Joe Lo Truglio as the bumbling men in black, and Jason Bateman as the scary man in black. Also passing through are some fun familiar faces like Jane Lynch, David Koechner, Jeffrey Tambor, John Carroll Lynch, and an iconic sci-fi actress who shall remain unnamed. Especially good is Kristen Wiig as a fundamentalist Christian whose mind is literally blown by Paul. Amid the broad humour and nonstop punch lines there's also a sweetness that stays with each finely drawn character (including Paul) and gives Paul an amiable sentimentality that runs throughout. Everyone clearly had fun making this movie, and that's exactly how it is to watch. --Ted Fry

  • Love, Honour And Obey [1999] Love, Honour And Obey | DVD | (05/05/2008) from £3.30  |  Saving you £6.69 (67.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    It must have seemed like fun at the time: a group of mates got together to play gangsters, ran around London's streets waving guns, dishing out beatings and shouting profanities at the top of their mockney lungs. It's the kind of game that any group of lads with a camcorder and a six-pack might indulge in on a Sunday afternoon. Unfortunately, these particular mates happen to be famous, so the result--Love, Honour and Obey--actually saw the dark of cinemas.Ray Winstone is Ray, head honcho of a North London crime outfit; Sean Pertwee is Sean, leader of the South London pack. Their organisations co-exist with a minimum of fuss, based on respect for each other's turf. Then Ray's nephew, Jude (Jude Law), introduces his mate, Jonny (Jonny Lee Miller), into the firm and the equilibrium goes up in gun smoke. Jonny's a hothead who disrespects Ray's rules and instigates a private feud with Matthew (Rhys Ifans), his opposite number in Sean's gang, and soon there are gun battles raging through the capital.Perhaps directors Dominic Anciano and Ray Burdis regard their work as avant-garde, a deconstruction of the movie-making myth or a dissection of genre--or maybe they are just having a laugh at our expense. Either way the result is tortuous, egotistical film making. To be fair, Love, Honour and Obey is at least a step up from their last effort, Final Cut, in which much the same cast again paraded under their own names and made utter fools of themselves, but that's like saying the Zeebrugge ferry disaster wasn't as bad as the Titanic. Still, at least it's not all boys playing with their penis extensions: there's also Sadie Frost and Denise Van Outen. --Jamie Graham

  • Edward Scissorhands [1991] Edward Scissorhands | DVD | (27/11/2000) from £4.49  |  Saving you £7.50 (62.60%)  |  RRP £11.99

    Edward Scissorhands achieves the nearly impossible feat of capturing the delicate flavour of a fable or fairy tale in a live-action movie. The story follows a young man named Edward (Johnny Depp), who was created by an inventor (Vincent Price, in one of his last roles) who died before he could give the poor creature a pair of human hands. Edward lives alone in a ruined Gothic castle that just happens to be perched above a pastel-coloured suburb inhabited by breadwinning husbands and frustrated housewives straight out of the 1950s. One day, Peg (Dianne Wiest), the local Avon lady, comes calling. Finding Edward alone, she kindly invites him to come home with her, where she hopes to help him with his pasty complexion and those nasty nicks he's given himself with his razor-sharp fingers. Soon Edward's skill with topiary sculpture and hair design make him popular in the neighbourhood--but the mood turns just as swiftly against the outsider when he starts to feel his own desires, particularly for Peg's daughter Kim (Winona Ryder). Most of director Tim Burton's movies (such as Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Beetlejuice and Batman) are visual spectacles with elements of fantasy but Edward Scissorhands is more tender and personal than the others. Edward's wild black hair is much like Burton's, suggesting that the character represents the director's own feelings of estrangement and co-option. Johnny Depp, making his first successful leap from TV to film, captures Edward's child-like vulnerability even while his physical posture evokes horror icons like the vampire in Nosferatu and the sleepwalker in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. Classic horror films, at their heart, feel a deep sympathy for the monsters they portray; simply and affectingly, Edward Scissorhands lays that heart bare. --Bret Fetzer On the DVD: Tim Burton is famed for his visual style not his ability as a raconteur, so it's no surprise to find that his directorial commentary is a little sparse. When he does open up it is to confirm that Edward Scissorhands remains his most personal and deeply felt project. The second audio commentary is by composer and regular Burton collaborator Danny Elfman, whose enchanting, balletic score gets an isolated music track all to itself with his remarks in-between cues. Again, for Elfman this movie remains one of his most cherished works, and it is a real musical treat to hear the entire score uninterrupted by dialogue and sound effects but illuminated by Elfman's lucid interstitial remarks. Also on the disc are some brief interview clips, a "making of" featurette and a gallery of conceptual artwork. The anamorphic widescreen print looks simply gorgeous. --Mark Walker

  • Mean Girls [2004] Mean Girls | DVD | (18/10/2004) from £3.30  |  Saving you £14.69 (81.70%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The cutting wit of Tina Fey (the first female head writer for US comedy breeding ground Saturday Night Live) brilliantly fuses pop culture and smart satire. Fey wrote Mean Girls, in which a formerly home-schooled girl named Cady (Lindsay Lohan) gets dropped into the sneaky, vicious world of the Plastics, three adolescent glamour-girls who dominate their public high school's social heirarchy. Cady first befriends a couple of art-punk outsiders who persuade her to infiltrate the Plastics and destroy them from within--but power corrupts, and Cady soon finds the glory of being a Plastic to be seductive. Mean Girls joins the ranks of Clueless, Bring It On, and Heathers, cunning movies that use the hormone-pressurized high school milieu to put the dark impulses of human nature--ambition, envy, lust, revenge--under a comic microscope. Fey manages to skewer everyone without forgetting the characters' hapless humanity; it's a dazzling and delightful balancing act. --Bret Fetzer

  • Big [1988] Big | DVD | (13/10/2003) from £2.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (77.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    A perfect marriage of novel but incisive writing, acting and direction, Big is the story of a 12-year-old boy who wishes he were older, and wakes up one morning as a30-year-old man (Tom Hanks). The script by Gary Ross(Dave) and Anne Spielberg finds some unexpected ways of attacking obvious issues of sex, work, and childhood friendships, and in all of these things the accent is on classy humour and great sensitivity. Hanks is remarkable in the lead, at times hilarious (reacting to caviar just as a 12-year-old would) and at others deeply tender. Penny Marshall became a first-rate filmmaker with this 1988 work. --Tom Keogh

  • Laurel & Hardy - The Collection (21-disc Box Set) [1918] Laurel & Hardy - The Collection (21-disc Box Set) | DVD | (03/05/2004) from £28.29  |  Saving you £3.21 (10.20%)  |  RRP £31.5

    The ultimate collection for fans of Laurel and Hardy: 21 discs of classic comedy! Content comprises: 1. A Chump At Oxford / Related Shorts 2. Classic Shorts / Someone's Ailing 3. Way Out West / Shorts 4. Classic Shorts / Ollie And Matrimony 5. Our Relations / Dual Roles Shorts 6. Classic Shorts / Murder In The Air 7. Blockheads / Themed Shorts 8. Classic Shorts / Blackmail 9. The Bohemian Girl / Related Shorts 10. Classic Shorts / Be Big / Laughing Gravy 11. Saps At Sea / Themed Shor

  • Mirror, Mirror (DVD) Mirror, Mirror (DVD) | DVD | (30/07/2012) from £4.73  |  Saving you £15.26 (76.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Mirror Mirror is a fresh and funny retelling of the Snow White legend, a family adventure for all ages, starring Oscar-winner Julia Roberts as the evil Queen who ruthlessly rules her captured kingdom and Lily Collins (The Blind Side) as Snow White, the princess in exile, plus Armie Hammer (The Social Network) as the Prince.

  • The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel + The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel [DVD] The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel + The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | DVD | (29/06/2015) from £5.00  |  Saving you £17.99 (78.30%)  |  RRP £22.99

    The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel While preparing for his imminent marriage to the love of his life Sunaina (Tina Desai). Sonny (Dev Patel) has his eye on a promising property now that his first venture The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the Elderly and Beautiful has only a single remaining vacancy – posing a rooming predicament for fresh arrivals Guy (Richard Gere) and Lavinia (Tamsin Greig). Evelyn and Douglas (Judi Dench and Bill Nighy) have now joined the Jaipur workforce while Norman and Carol (Ronald Pickup and Diana Hardcastle) are negotiating the tricky waters of an exclusive relationship as Madge (Celia Imrie) juggles two eligible and very wealthy suitors. And newly installed co-manager of the hotel Muriel (Maggie Smith) knows everyone's secrets. As the demands of a traditional Indian wedding threaten to engulf them all an unexpected way forward presents itself.

  • Three Men And A Baby / Three Men And A Little Lady [1987] Three Men And A Baby / Three Men And A Little Lady | DVD | (10/10/2005) from £5.19  |  Saving you £12.80 (71.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Three Men And A Baby (Dir. Leonard Nimoy 1987): They changed her diapers. She changed their lives. Take three of Hollywood's hottest stars of the '80s add one adorable baby girl and the result is one of the biggest funniest comedy hits ever! Three handsome Manhattan bachelors finding their dating and mating rituals irreparably damaged when an unexpected new roommate - complete with crib pacifier and dirty diaper - shows up on their doorstep. This bouncing bundle of

  • The Very Best Of Whatever Happened To The Likely Lads (Box Set) The Very Best Of Whatever Happened To The Likely Lads (Box Set) | DVD | (16/10/2006) from £10.49  |  Saving you £19.50 (65.00%)  |  RRP £29.99

    One of the best British sitcoms of all-time The Likely Lads focuses on the friendship between two working-class men James Bolam and Rodney Bewes living in the north east of England. Bob (Bewes) is the 'sensible' one doing his best to get on with his job and 'better' himself. Terry (Bolam) is the 'irresponsible' one intent on living life to the full. He's forever getting himself (and Terry) into trouble of one kind or another... Several Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais re

  • The Angels' Share [DVD] The Angels' Share | DVD | (24/09/2012) from £3.89  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    From award-winning director Ken Loach and writer Paul Laverty comes a bitter sweet comedy caper which proves that sometimes all you need in life is a little spirit. Escaping a prison sentence by the skin of his teeth, the wayward and disillusioned Robbie is given one last chance to turn his life around. Together the four friends he embarks on an adventure and discovers that turning to drink might just change their lives - not cheap fortified wine, but the best malt whiskies in the world.

  • Good Morning, Vietnam [1988] Good Morning, Vietnam | DVD | (13/05/2002) from £4.75  |  Saving you £10.80 (67.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Good Morning Vietnam is a more than usually human take on America’s most controversial war, an often poignant and always entertaining fictionalisation of the Vietnam years of DJ Adrian Cronauer (Robin Williams). Cronauer is employed as the voice of the US Armed Forces radio in South East Asia, but it soon emerges that his idea of entertaining the troops and the Army’s are poles apart. This isn’t a biopic--director Barry Levinson doesn’t give any detail of Cronauer’s life before Vietnam--instead it’s about Cronauer discovering a better understanding of the war, the people and himself. Interspersed with the radio sequences is a gentle plot which follows Cronauer as he teaches English to some Vietnamese kids, falls for a local girl and narrowly misses being killed in a terrorist attack. However, it is the sheer frenetic genius of Williams’ largely improvised radio monologues that account for the film’s box office success. On the DVD: Good Morning Vietnam gets the special edition DVD with digitally remastered audio and picture. Extras include a couple of previews--both the theatrical and a teaser trailer--as well as a production diary which contains interviews with director Levinson, crew and the real Cronauer. But the best feature by far is the "Raw Monologues": introduced by Levinson, this featurette shows the process that Robin Williams went through to improvise the radio slots and is a valuable insight into the comedic talents of the film’s star.--Kristen Bowditch

  • Young Frankenstein [1974] Young Frankenstein | DVD | (30/10/2000) from £4.99  |  Saving you £8.00 (61.60%)  |  RRP £12.99

    If you were to argue Mel Brooks' Young Frankenstein ranks among the top-10 funniest movies of all time, nobody could reasonably dispute the claim. Spoofing classic horror in the way that Brooks' previous film Blazing Saddles sent up classic Westerns, the movie is both a loving tribute and a raucous, irreverent parody of Universal's classic horror films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Filming in glorious black and white, Brooks recreated the Frankenstein laboratory using the equipment from the original Frankenstein (courtesy of designer Kenneth Strickfaden), and this loving attention to physical and stylistic detail creates a solid foundation for non-stop comedy. The story, of course, involves Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) and his effort to resume experiments in re-animation pioneered by his late father. (He's got some help, since dad left behind a book titled How I Did It.) Assisting him is the hapless hunchback Igor (Marty Feldman) and the buxom but none-too-bright maiden Inga (Teri Garr), and when Frankenstein succeeds in creating his monster (Peter Boyle), the stage is set for an outrageous revision of the Frankenstein legend. With comedy highlights too numerous to mention, Brooks guides his brilliant cast (also including Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars and Gene Hackman in a classic cameo role) through scene after scene of inspired hilarity. Indeed, Young Frankenstein is a charmed film, nothing less than a comedy classic, representing the finest work from everyone involved. Not one joke has lost its payoff, and none of the countless gags have lost their zany appeal. From a career that includes some of the best comedies ever made, this is the film for which Mel Brooks will be most fondly remembered. No video library should be without a copy of Young Frankenstein. And just remember--it's pronounced "Fronkensteen". --Jeff Shannon

  • Groundhog Day [1993] Groundhog Day | DVD | (18/02/2002) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Bill Murray does warmth in Groundhog Day, a romantic fantasy about a wacky weatherman forced to relive one strange day over and over again, until he gets it right. Snowed in during a road-trip expedition to watch the famous groundhog encounter his shadow, Murray falls into a time warp that is never explained but pays off so richly that it doesn't need to be. Director Harold Ramis (who co-starred with Murray in Ghostbusters) takes an absurd situation and explores its every imaginable comic possibility. The elaborate loop-the-loop plot structure cooked up by screenwriter Danny Rubin is crystal-clear every step of the way, but it is Murray's world-class reactive timing that makes the jokes explode, and we end up looking forward to each new variation. Because none of the other characters are aware that Groundhog Day is continually repeating itself, Murray goes through a repertoire of responses, from conniving lust for Rita (Andie MacDowell) to gleeful nihilism to a Zen resignation worthy of Buster Keaton. Groundhog Day manages the rare feat of producing belly laughs in abundance and also being genuinely wise about the human condition. --David Chute, Amazon.com On the DVD: the disc presents the movie in a 1.85:1 ratio and with Dolby surround sound. There are trailers for Groundhog Day, Ghostbusters and Multiplicity, along with filmographies for Harold Ramis, Bill Murray, Andie McDowell and Chris Elliot. This remastered edition also comes with an extended documentary "The Weight of Time", which offers insights into the "European"-style script and production difficulties, but is a little over-lavish in its praise of the actors on set. Thought-provokingly, the documentary also touches upon the spiritual nature of the movie and what it has meant to an audience beyond being a simple comedy. Also included here is a director’s commentary by Ramis which, although informative, has too many long breaks and would surely have benefited from the addition of Bill Murray to the conversation. --Nikki Disney

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