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  • Elf [2003] Elf | DVD | (08/11/2004) from £4.44  |  Saving you £5.55 (55.60%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Elf is genuinely good. Not just Saturday Night Live-movie good, when the movie has some funny bits but is basically an insult to humanity; Elf is a smartly written, skillfully directed, and deftly acted story of a human being adopted by Christmas elves who returns to the human world to find his father. And because the writing, directing, and acting are all genuinely good, Elf is also genuinely funny. Will Ferrell, as Buddy the adopted elf, is hysterically sincere. James Caan, as his rediscovered father, executes his surly dumbfoundedness with perfect aplomb. Zooey Deschanel, as a department store worker with whom Buddy falls in love, is adorably sardonic. Director Jon Favreau (Swingers) shepherds the movie through all the obligatory Christmas cliches and focuses on material that's sometimes subtle and consistently surprising. Frankly, Elf feels miraculous. Also featuring Mary Steenburgen, Bob Newhart, Peter Dinklage, and Ed Asner as Santa Claus. --Bret Fetzer

  • Elf [Blu-ray] [2003] Elf | Blu Ray | (17/11/2008) from £5.49  |  Saving you £12.50 (69.50%)  |  RRP £17.99

    After inadvertently wreaking havoc on the elf community due to his ungainly size a man raised as an elf at the North Pole is sent to the U.S. in search of his true identity. This charming fantasy is packed full of hysterically funny moments and is destined to be a future classic!

  • Hairspray (2007) Hairspray (2007) | DVD | (19/11/2007) from £4.19  |  Saving you £15.80 (79.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    It's rare that a movie captures the intensity and excitement of a live Broadway musical production while appealing to a broader movie-going audience, but the 2007 Hairspray is an energetic, powerfully moving film that does just that. A re-make of the 1988 musical film Hairspray the new Hairspray is a film adaptation of the 2002 Broadway musical and features more likeable characters than the original film and an incredible energy that stems from a great cast, fabulous new music, and the influence of musical producer Craig Zadan. What remains constant throughout all three versions of Hairspray is the story's thought-provoking exploration of prejudice and racism. Set in Baltimore in 1962, the film opens with chubby girl Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky) singing her heart out in a rendition of "Good Morning Baltimore" that, while admittedly a bit too long, sets the farcical tone for the film. Viewers quickly become immersed in Tracy's teenage world of popular television dance shows, big hair, the stigma of being different, and the first hesitant steps toward racial integration within a segregated world. The Corny Collins (James Marsdon) television dance show is a teenage obsession in Tracy's world and Link Larkin (Zac Efron) is every girl's dream partner, so when a call for auditions goes out, Tracy skips school to try out, but is rejected by station manager Velma von Tussle (Michelle Pfeiffer) because of her large size and the threat of competition for Velma's own daughter Amber (Brittany Snow). Perseverance and the support of her friend Penny (Amanda Bynes), father Wilbur (Christopher Walken), and negro dancer Seaweed (Elijah Kelley) lead Tracy to the spotlight and the chance of a lifetime, but more and more Tracy discovers that fairness and equality for those who are different does not come without a fight and that sacrifices must be made to effect change. While the message is serious, Hairspray is first and foremost a comedy with stellar performances by John Travolta as Edna Turnblad (who ever imagined Saturday Night Fever's iconic star would appear onscreen as a woman?), Christopher Walken, and Michelle Pfeiffer. Part of what makes Hairspray so powerful is the exceptional music composed by Marc Shaiman, including songs newly composed for the movie like "Ladies' Choice," "The New Girl in Town," and "Come So Far," and the awesome vocal talents of Queen Latifah (Motormouth Maybelle) and a cast of heretofore musically-unknown actors like Nikki Blonsky, Zac Efron, and Brittany Snow who really can sing. Notable trivia includes Jerry Stiller's appearance in both versions of the film (as Wilbur in the 1988 film and as Mr. Pinky in this 2007 rendition), and a cameo appearance by 1988 director and screenplay writer John Waters. Hairspray is one of the best films of the year--it's powerfully moving entertainment that leaves you energized and motivated to fight for what you believe in. --Tami Horiuchi

  • Christmas with the Kranks [2004] Christmas with the Kranks | DVD | (14/11/2005) from £4.69  |  Saving you £11.30 (70.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    No! Ho! Ho! The Kranks have always celebrated a picture-perfect Christmas. But with their only daughter Blair (Julie Gonzalo) away from home on her Peace Corps assignment Nora (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Luther (Tim Allen) are suffering from empty nest syndrome and decide to skip Christmas in favor of a Caribbean cruise. But their neighbours led by Vic Frohmeyer (Dan Akroyd) take Christmas very seriously and are none too happy about the Kranks' boycott. In this neighbourhood w

  • School of Rock [2004] School of Rock | DVD | (12/07/2004) from £3.89  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Turbo-charged comic Jack Black shakes School of Rock to its foundations, wailing with born-again metalhead passion as Dewey Finn, a guitarist who gets kicked out of a band because he grandstands too much--or, to put it another way, enjoys himself. Through an intercepted phone call, Finn gets a job as a substitute teacher for a fifth grade class at a private grade school. Neither students nor teacher quite know what to do with each other until Finn discovers that some of his young charges can play instruments; at once he starts turning them into a blistering rock & roll troupe that can crush his former band at an upcoming competition. School of Rock is silly and formulaic, but director Richard Linklater (Dazed and Confused), writer Mike White (The Good Girl), and especially Black and co-star Joan Cusack invest the formulas with such glee that the movie is irresistibly fun. --Bret Fetzer On the DVD: Like the movie, the DVD extras are smarter and a lot more entertaining than your average flick. The making-of feature ("Lessons Learned") has the usual behind-the-scenes banter but Jack Black is in fine form--that is, something special--interviewing as much as being interviewed about the making of the film. His unique pitch to Led Zeppelin to use their song is alone worth the price of the DVD. Black is more his maniacal self and a bit more grating in MTV's Diary segment, but his commentary track with director Richard Linklater is as insightful as it is funny. Ok, it's a lot more funny, but entertaining throughout. The commentary track featuring just the kid actors is less so, but any preteen would love listening to it. To top it off, the DVD-ROM has Dewey Finn's instantly famous blackboard history of rock. You can drill down to the bands mentioned and get a brief history of each. --Doug Thomas

  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel [DVD] The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | DVD | (29/06/2015) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    While preparing for his imminent marriage to the love of his life Sunaina (Tina Desai). Sonny (Dev Patel) has his eye on a promising property now that his first venture The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the Elderly and Beautiful has only a single remaining vacancy – posing a rooming predicament for fresh arrivals Guy (Richard Gere) and Lavinia (Tamsin Greig). Evelyn and Douglas (Judi Dench and Bill Nighy) have now joined the Jaipur workforce while Norman and Carol (Ronald Pickup and Diana Hardcastle) are negotiating the tricky waters of an exclusive relationship as Madge (Celia Imrie) juggles two eligible and very wealthy suitors. And newly installed co-manager of the hotel Muriel (Maggie Smith) knows everyone's secrets. As the demands of a traditional Indian wedding threaten to engulf them all an unexpected way forward presents itself.

  • Eddie The Eagle [DVD] [2016] Eddie The Eagle | DVD | (08/08/2016) from £5.00  |  Saving you £14.99 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring Taron Egerton (Kingsman: The Secret Service) and Hugh Jackman (Wolverine) comes Eddie The Eagle, a story following Michael Edwards (a.k.a Eddie), and his unflinching determination to become Great Britain's first Olympic ski-jumper. Reluctantly aided by former ski-jumper Bronson Peary as his coach, Eddie is unwavering in his quest to reach the 1988 Calgary Winter Games. Eddie the Eagle is an uplifting, inspirational story that celebrates human spirit, passion, and one man's refusal to accept defeat. Directed by Dexter Fletcher (Sunshine on Leith) and produced by Matthew Vaughn (Kingsman: The Secret Service). Also starring Jo Hartley (?This Is England'), Tim McInnerny (?Blackadder'), Keith Allen (?Robin Hood'), Iris Berban (?Rosa Roth') and Rune Temte (?The Last Kingdom'), Christopher Walken (?Catch Me If You Can') and Jim Broadbent (?Bridget Jones' Diary').

  • Gone With The Wind Gone With The Wind | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.00  |  Saving you £8.99 (64.30%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Gone with the Wind is a sprawling mosaic of a picture, one of the best-loved and most successful in movie history, but also one of the most frustrating. Wonderfully epic in scope, the decline and fall of the antebellum South as seen through the eyes of feisty, independent and wilful heroine Scarlett O'Hara makes the first half of the picture an absolutely riveting spectacle. From the aristocratic old world of Tara to the horrors of Atlanta under siege, Gone with the Wind features any number of indelible scenes and images: the genteel girls taking an enforced siesta during the Twelve Oaks barbecue, a horrified Scarlett walking through the wounded, the flight from burning Atlanta, and Scarlett's moving pledge against a burnished sunset set to Max Steiner's glorious music score. But the second half shifts gear, the melodramatic quotient is upped yet further as tragedy piles upon tragedy, and despite its unwieldy length everything feels rushed. Add to that the central problem that the audience never really understands, why Scarlett could ever fall for weak-chinned Ashley in the first place, and the picture begins to unravel unsatisfactorily. Behind the scenes problems doubtless contributed, with directors coming and going, Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable apparently barely able to stand the sight of each other, and producer David O Selznick's endless rewrites and interference. Nonetheless, this 1939 box-office smash remains one of Hollywood's finest achievements, an irresistible spectacle chock-full of the finest stars in the filmic firmament striking sparks off one another. They really don't make 'em like this anymore. On the DVD: No extra features on this DVD, which is a pity given the amount of material that must be available, but it has to be admitted this disc is worth the asking price simply to drink in the astonishing quality of the picture, sumptuously presented in its original 1.33:1 "Academy" ratio. The mono sound is vivid, too, showcasing Max Steiner's headily romantic score. --Mark Walker

  • Tim Burton's Corpse Bride [2005] Tim Burton's Corpse Bride | DVD | (06/02/2006) from £3.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (79.00%)  |  RRP £18.99

    Set in a 19th century European village this stop-motion animated feature follows the story of Victor (voiced by Johnny Depp) a young man who is whisked away to the underworld and wed to a mysterious Corpse Bride while his real bride Victoria waits bereft in the land of the living. Though life in the Land of the Dead proves to be a lot more colourful than his strict Victorian upbringing Victor learns that there is nothing in this world or the next that can keep him away from h

  • Nativity Story [2006] Nativity Story | DVD | (02/04/2007) from £4.87  |  Saving you £5.12 (51.30%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The Nativity Story chronicles the arduous journey of Mary and Joseph through a miraculous pregnancy to the history-defining birth of Jesus. This dramatic and compelling story comes to life in an epic motion picture starring Keisha Castle-Hughes as Mary Oscar Isaac as Joseph and Academy Award nominee Shohreh Aghdashloo as Elizabeth the mother of John the Baptist.

  • Brief Encounter [1945] Brief Encounter | DVD | (15/09/2008) from £3.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (69.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Noel Coward's sensitive portrayal of what happens when two happily married strangers played by Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson meet and their acquaintance deepens into affection and eventually into love. It is the story of two people thrown together by the chance meeting of the title helpless in the face of their emotions but redeemed by their moral courage. Over the years few films have equalled the compassion and the realism of Brief Encounter.

  • Letters to Juliet [DVD] Letters to Juliet | DVD | (04/10/2010) from £3.70  |  Saving you £16.29 (81.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    On holiday in romantic Verona Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) explores the city alone as her fianc'' (Gael Garcia Bernal) spends his time working. Mesmerized by the wall of letters in Juliet Capulet's Courtyard she soon befriends the secretaries of Juliet who diligently answer them every day. When Sophie finds a decades-old unanswered letter she responds herself. To her surprise the author Claire (Vanessa Redgrave) and her uptight grandson (Christopher Egan) arrive and sweep her along on a romantic adventure she could never have imagined...

  • Serendipity [DVD] [2001] Serendipity | DVD | (17/04/2011) from £6.59  |  Saving you £13.40 (67.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In one magical moment Jonathan Trager and Sara Thomas meet unexpectedly and spend a romantic winter day together although both are involved with other people. At the end of the night Sara decides they must let fate determine if they are meant to be together and disappears without giving Jonathan a way of reaching her. Years later they are both engaged to others but cannot give up the dream that they will meet again. And so begins their journey to find one another worlds apart!

  • The Lake House [2006] The Lake House | DVD | (09/10/2006) from £3.99  |  Saving you £14.00 (77.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    How do you hold on to someone you've never met? An independent-minded doctor (Sandra Bullock) who once occupied an unusual lakeside home begins exchanging love letters with its newest resident a frustrated architect (Keanu Reeves). When they discover that they're actually living two years apart they must try to unravel the mystery behind their extraordinary romance before it's too late.

  • Remember The Titans [2001] Remember The Titans | DVD | (26/11/2001) from £3.89  |  Saving you £12.10 (75.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Boaz Yakin's Remember the Titans boasts only one major star (Denzel Washington), but it does have an appealing cast of fresh unknowns and a winning emphasis on substance over self-indulgent style. Set in Alexandria, Virginia in 1971, the fact-based story begins with the integration of black and white students at T C Williams High School. The effort to improve race relations is most keenly felt on the school's football team, the Titans, and bigoted tempers flare when a black head coach (Washington) is appointed and his victorious predecessor (Will Patton) reluctantly stays on as his assistant. It's affirmative action at its most volatile, complicated by the mandate that the coach will be fired if he loses a single game in the Titans' 13-game season.The players represent a hotbed of racial tension, but as the team struggle towards unity and gridiron glory, Remember the Titans builds on several subplots and character dynamics to become an inspirational drama of Rocky-like proportions. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.comOn the DVD: Remember the Titans looks impressive in 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen, with Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS 5.1 sound options equally up to the "big game" challenge. Extras include a "making of" feature, hosted by Lynn Swann, which will seem a tad on the sentimental side for non-American audiences; but to balance the schmaltz there are two more interesting behind-the-scenes featurettes: "Denzel Becomes Boone" and "Beating the Odds". The commentary is standard, relatively uninspired stuff, with director Boaz Yakin, producer Jerry Bruckheimer and writer Gregory Allen Howard giving the low-down on the production. Even with the addition of a couple of deleted scenes and the theatrical trailer there isn’t really anything to get DVD aficionados drooling here. --Kristen Bowditch

  • Miss Potter [2006] Miss Potter | DVD | (23/04/2007) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    This biopic follows Beatrix Potter's rise to being the most successful children's author of all time. Despite delighting generations of children with her books she kept her own story locked carefully away. The film reveals how she developed her artistic and story-telling abilities from a young age and rebelled against the conventions of the time by refusing to marry for the sake of it. Her first book The Tale of Peter Rabbit was a publishing phenomenon and led to a captivating romance with her publisher Norman Warne.

  • The Artist [DVD] The Artist | DVD | (28/05/2012) from £3.39  |  Saving you £21.60 (86.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    The Artist is a love letter and homage to classic black-and-white silent films. The film is enormously likable and is anchored by a charming performance from Jean Dujardin, as silent movie star George Valentin. In late-1920s Hollywood, as Valentin wonders if the arrival of talking pictures will cause him to fade into oblivion, he makes an intense connection with Peppy Miller, a young dancer set for a big break. As one career declines, another flourishes, and by channeling elements of A Star Is Born and Singing in the Rain, The Artist tells the engaging story with humour, melodrama, romance, and--most importantly--silence. As wonderful as the performances by Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo (Miller) are, the real star of The Artist is cinematographer Guillaume Schiffman. Visually, the film is stunning. Crisp and beautifully contrasted, each frame is so wonderfully constructed that this sweet and unique little movie is transformed from entertaining fluff to a profound cinematic achievement. --Kira Canny

  • Arsenic And Old Lace [1944] Arsenic And Old Lace | DVD | (07/05/2001) from £4.75  |  Saving you £9.24 (66.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    In 1941, when Frank Capra filmed Arsenic and Old Lace, he was in the midst of his string of social-concern pictures. So this uncharacteristic property must have seemed like a vacation; it's a straight farce, played at full tilt and closely adapted from the Broadway play. Almost all of the action takes place on a single set: the old home of the Brewster sisters (Josephine Hull and Jean Adair), those dear, dotty old ladies who mix up a very special elderberry wine. Very special. As their nephew Mortimer (Cary Grant) discovers on the eve of his wedding, the two ladies have been spiking the wine with poison and sending lonely gentleman callers off to the great beyond. More specifically, they've been burying them in the cellar with the help of nutty Uncle Teddy, who thinks he's Teddy Roosevelt (and thus digging the Panama Canal down in the basement). The ominous happenings are made more sinister with the arrival of another menacing relative (RaymondMassey) and his quack doctor (Peter Lorre), who look and act like refugees from a horror movie. Played completely over the top, this movie offers up lots of bracing slapstick, with Grant run to near exhaustion by the galloping insanity of his family. Although Capra shot the film in 1941, prior to his making military films during World War II, the film was not released until 1944; the contract stipulated that the movie not come out before the play ended its enormously successful run. --Robert Horton

  • Ben Hur [1959] Ben Hur | DVD | (05/11/2001) from £4.75  |  Saving you £15.24 (76.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Ben-Hur scooped an unprecedented 11 Academy Awards in 1959 and, unlike some later rivals to this record-breaking win, richly deserved every single one. This is epic filmmaking on a scale that had not been seen before, and is unlikely ever to be seen again. It cost a staggering 15 million dollars and was one of the largest film productions ever undertaken: the Circus Maximus set alone covered 18 acres and was filled with 40,000 tons of Mediterranean sand. But it's not just running time or a cast of thousands that makes an epic, it's the subject-matter that counts and in Ben-Hur the subject is rich, detailed and sensitively handled. Despite both the original novel's and the film's subtitle, "A Tale of the Christ", this is really a parallel life, that of Prince Judah Ben-Hur (Charlton Heston) and his estrangement from old Roman pal Messala (Stephen Boyd). The eponymous character's journey of self-discovery through bitterness and hate to eventual redemption has many deliberate echoes of Christ's life (at one point, Judah is mistaken for Jesus, much as Brian would be later in Monty Python's masterful satire), and the multi-layered script from (uncredited) literary titans Gore Vidal and Christopher Fry wrings out every nuance and every possible shade of meaning.Director William Wyler, who had been a junior assistant on MGM's original silent version back in 1925, never sacrifices the human focus of the story in favour of spectacle (he had the good sense to leave the great chariot race to second-unit director and experienced stuntman Yakima Canutt), and it is his concentration on human drama and fully rounded characters that gives Wyler's epic its heart. In this he is aided immeasurably by Miklós Rózsa's majestic musical score, arguably the greatest ever written for a Hollywood picture, in which the development of character-driven leitmotifs produces the effect of grand opera. The Christian theme concentrates on the central character's love and compassion for his family (evoked by the discovery of their leprosy) rather than any heavy-handed sermonising (the figure of Christ is seen but never heard--his presence signalled by a serene musical motif instead).On the DVD: this long-awaited release presents the film's original theatrical aspect ratio of 2.76:1 in a glorious anamorphic print, complete with remastered Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack. The music sounds fresher than ever, and both the theatrical "Overture" and "Entracte" are included (civilised times the 1950s: they had specially composed intermission music to enjoy while topping up on ice cream and popcorn!). There's an extensive and enjoyable documentary tracing the history of the story from Lew Wallace through stage productions to the first MGM version in 1925 and then to the 1959 production. Charlton Heston provides an intermittent commentary, evidently enjoying the experience of watching the film again, and his comments are usefully indexed so you can skip to the next bit without having to sit through chunks of silence (during the chariot race he voiced his concern to second-unit director Yakima Canutt that the stuntmen were better drivers. Replied Canutt: "Chuck, just drive the damn chariot and I guarantee that you'll win"). There's also a couple of screen tests, one with Leslie Nielsen in pre-Naked Gun days as Messala and a photo gallery and theatrical trailers complete an epic DVD package. --Mark Walker

  • Napoleon Dynamite [2004] Napoleon Dynamite | DVD | (25/04/2005) from £5.59  |  Saving you £10.40 (65.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    He's out to prove he's got nothing to prove. From Preston Idaho comes Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) a new kind of hero complete with a tight red 'fro some sweet moon boots and skills that can't be topped. Napoleon lives with his Grandma (Sandy Martin) and his 30 year old unemployed brother Kip (Aaron Russell) who spends his days looking for love in internet chat rooms. When Grandma hits the road on her quad runner Napoleon and Kip's meddling Uncle Rico (Jon Gries) comes to town to stay with them and run their lives. Napoleon is left to his own devices to impress the chicks at school and help his new best friend (Efren Ramirez) win the election for Student Body President against the stuck up Summer (Haylie Duff); all the while making sure to feed Grandma's pet Llama Tina and avoiding association with Uncle Rico and the herbal breast enhancers he sells door to door. Napoleon and Pedro put their skills and knowledge of pirates cows and drawing to good use but it is a surprise talent that leads to the pair's triumph in the end...

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