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  • Casablanca [1942] Casablanca | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.45  |  Saving you £6.54 (54.50%)  |  RRP £11.99

    A truly perfect movie, the 1942 Casablanca still wows viewers today, and for good reason. Its unique story of a love triangle set against terribly high stakes in the war against a monster is sophisticated instead of outlandish, intriguing instead of garish. Humphrey Bogart plays the allegedly apolitical club owner in unoccupied French territory that is nevertheless crawling with Nazis; Ingrid Bergman is the lover who mysteriously deserted him in Paris; and Paul Heinreid is her heroic, slightly bewildered husband. Claude Rains, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Conrad Veidt are among what may be the best supporting cast in the history of Hollywood films. This is certainly among the most spirited and ennobling movies ever made.--Tom Keogh

  • The Railway Children [DVD] [1970] The Railway Children | DVD | (03/05/2010) from £8.48  |  Saving you £4.51 (34.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Starring Jenny Agutter as the oldest daughter of an Edwardian family thrown on hard times when their father is wrongly sent to prison. The Railway Children avert a train disaster save an imperiled steeple chaser and reunite an exiled Russian with his wife all with equal enterprise. Based on the novel by Edith Nesbit.

  • A Matter Of Life And Death [1946] A Matter Of Life And Death | DVD | (11/06/2007) from £4.59  |  Saving you £15.40 (77.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Briefed by the Ministry of Information to make a film that would foster Anglo-American relations in the post-war period, innovative filmmakers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, came up with A Matter of Life and Death, an extravagant and extraordinary fantasy in which David Niven stars as a downed pilot who must justify his continuing existence to a heavenly panel because he has made the mistake of falling in love with an American girl (Kim Hunter) when he really should have been dead. National stereotypes are lampooned as the angelic judges squabble over his fate. In a neat reversal of expectations, the heaven sequences are black and white, while earth is seen in Technicolor. Daring cinematography mixes monochrome and colour, incorporates time-lapse images and even toys with background "time freezes" 50 years before The Matrix. Roger Livesey and Raymond Massey lead the fine supporting cast. This is one of the undoubted jewels of British cinema. On the DVD: A Matter of Life and Death is presented in reasonably sharp 4:3 ratio with decent mono sound. Aside from English hard-of-hearing subtitles there are no extras. --Mark Walker

  • Pride And Prejudice - 2005 Pride And Prejudice - 2005 | DVD | (06/02/2006) from £3.15  |  Saving you £16.84 (84.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A romance ahead of its time... The five Bennet sisters - Elizabeth or Lizzie (Keira Knightley) Jane (Rosamund Pike) Lydia (Jena Malone) Mary (Talulah Riley) and Kitty (Carey Mulligan) - have been raised well aware of their mother's (Brenda Blethyn) fixation on finding them husbands and securing set futures. The spirited and intelligent Elizabeth however strives to live her life with a broader perspective as encouraged by her doting father (Donald Sutherland). When weal

  • The Santa Clause 2 [2002] The Santa Clause 2 | DVD | (17/11/2003) from £3.88  |  Saving you £14.00 (77.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Considering how lame this sequel could have been, The Santa Clause 2 makes for a pleasant seasonal diversion. It's got the familiar smell of Disney marketeering, and more than a few parents will object to this further embellishment of the St Nick legend, but Tim Allen's amiable presence provides ample compensation. As a divorced dad who inherited the jolly man's job in The Santa Clause, Allen now faces another Yuletide challenge. According to the "Missus Clause" in his North Pole contract, he can't continue to be the real Santa until he gets married. As luck and five credited screenwriters would have it, Allen falls for the Scroogey principal (Elizabeth Mitchell) of his son's school, while a phoney, power-hungry duplicate Santa wreaks havoc on the North Pole's overworked elves. It's all as sweet as spiced eggnog, with that warmed-over feel of a mandated sequel, but the Christmas spirit does prevail with the sound of sleigh bells and Allen's rosy-cheeked "Ho, ho, ho!". --Jeff Shannon

  • Chicken Run [2000] Chicken Run | DVD | (04/12/2000) from £5.59  |  Saving you £7.40 (57.00%)  |  RRP £12.99

    As warming as a nice cup of tea on a cloudy day, Chicken Run is that charming singularity, a commercially successful British family movie that has near-universal appeal without compromising its inherent British pluckiness (that will be the first and last poultry-pun in this review). It invites us into the Plasticine-world of Tweedy's farm, a far-from-free-range egg factory ruled with an axe of iron by greedy Mrs.Tweedy. One intrepid chicken, Ginger (voiced by Julia Sawalha) sets her sights on breaking out the whole flock, a cast of beautifully individuated chicken characters including ditsy Babs (voiced by Jane Horrocks), matronly Bunty (Imelda Staunton) and practical-minded Mac (Lynn Ferguson). Each effort is thwarted, and Ginger repeatedly reaps a spell in the coal bunker for her troubles, prompting the first of many allusions to The Great Escape, one of several World War II films name-checked throughout. (Grown-ups will have a ball playing Spot-the-Allusion Game here.) When an American rooster named Rocky (Mel Gibson) literally drops in from the air, the hens are set all a-flutter with excitement thinking he'll help teach them to fly away at last. But Rocky is not all he seems. Although the action sags just a fraction around the 40-minute mark, it's the set pieces that really lift this into the realm of cartoon genius: the montage of inept flying attempts, Rocky and Ginger's narrow escape from Mrs Tweedy's new pie machine (an horrific contraption of chomping steel and industrial menace) and the magnificent, soaring climax. Despite the fact British animators (such as the directors, Nick Park and Peter Lord, themselves) regularly scoop Oscars for their short films, our record in full-feature length cartoons has been scrappy at best. There have been a few highlights--Animal Farm (1955), The Yellow Submarine (1968), Watership Down (1978)--and, er, that's about it really, unless you count The Magic Roundabout: Dougal and the Blue Cat. ChickenRun, made by the Aardman production house who produced the delightful Wallace and Gromit shorts among many other treats, has proved that Britain can compete with the most calculated, merchandised and screen-tested Disney production and win. --Leslie Felperin

  • Mrs Miniver [1942] Mrs Miniver | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £5.49  |  Saving you £8.50 (60.80%)  |  RRP £13.99

    A movie doesn't win seven Oscars for nothing. A glowing Greer Garson (Best Actress) commands the screen as Mrs Miniver, a middle-class British housewife whose strength holds her family together as World War II literally hits their home. Walter Pidgeon as her architect husband seems to be the prototype for future TV dads in this affecting portrait of love--familial and romantic--during war. But the relationship between Mrs Miniver's college-age son (Richard Ney) and the upper-crust Carol (Best Supporting Actress Teresa Wright) is filled with inherent drama--as the war speeds up their young love, it also has the potential to doom it. The 1942 film, which also won for Best Picture and Best Director, is filled with colourful characters, snappy dialogue and sensational plot twists. Although you spend much of the movie dreading that one of the Minivers will become a casualty of war, when it finally happens, it's not what you anticipated. Exactly what you would expect from a legendary film that lives up to its billing. --Valerie J. Nelson, Amazon.com

  • Secretariat [DVD] [2010] Secretariat | DVD | (28/03/2011) from £3.88  |  Saving you £7.70 (64.20%)  |  RRP £11.99

    The "greatest racehorse of all time" mantle fits easily around the neck of Secretariat, the 1973 Triple Crown winner. So why not a movie version of this champion's life? Secretariat begins in the late '60s, with some good behind-the-scenes material on how thoroughbreds come to be (there's flavorful atmosphere inside the horsey world, including an account of Secretariat's ownership being decided by a coin flip as part of an old-school agreement). A highly lacquered Diane Lane plays Penny Chenery, the inheritor of her father's stables, who segues from being an all-American mom to running a major horse-racing franchise; reliable character-actor support comes in the form of John Malkovich, as a gaudily outfitted trainer, and Margo Martindale, as Chenery's assistant. Screenwriter Mike Rich and director Randall Wallace must do some heavy lifting to make Lane's privileged millionaire into some sort of underdog--luckily, the hidebound traditions of the male-dominated racing scene provide some sources of outrage. The need to stack the deck even more leads the movie into its more contrived scenes, unfortunately, as though we needed dastardly villains in order to root for Penny and her horse. Meanwhile, attempts to reach for a little Seabiscuit-style social relevance don't come off, and a curious religious undertone might make you wonder whether we're meant to assume that God chose Secretariat over some less-deserving equine. The actual excitement of the races can't be denied, however, and Secretariat's awe-inspiring win at the Belmont Stakes remains a jaw-dropping, still-unequalled display of domination in that event. And maybe in sports. --Robert Horton

  • Goodbye Mr Chips [1939] Goodbye Mr Chips | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £4.75  |  Saving you £9.24 (66.00%)  |  RRP £13.99

    One more terrific film from a terrific year for movies--1939, the year of Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz and Stagecoach, among others--Sam Wood's Goodbye Mr Chips is a deeply stirring work starring Robert Donat as the old schoolmaster who looks back upon his life. Told mostly in flashbacks, the film wraps itself around a history of an older England as seen through the generations of boys who pass through Mr Chips's classroom. Greer Garson is her usual classy, sexy-intelligent self as Donat's wife, their earlier courtship one of the film's highlights. Get a box of tissues at the ready, for this one. --Tom Keogh

  • Nativity Combi Pack [Blu-ray + DVD ] Nativity Combi Pack | Blu Ray | (22/11/2010) from £5.39  |  Saving you £2.05 (27.60%)  |  RRP £7.44

    Starring Martin Freeman Ashley Jenson Alan Carr and Mark Wootton comes the ultimate British feel-good Christmas film for the whole family. This Christmas primary school teacher Paul Maddens (Martin Freeman) is being charged with the biggest challenge of his life - mounting the school's musical version of the Nativity. Competing against the posh local school for the honour of best reviewed show in town the stakes are raised when Paul idly boasts that his ex-girlfriend Jennifer (Ashley Jenson) a Hollywood Producer is coming to see his show with a view to turning it into a film. The only trouble is - they haven't spoken in years. With eccentric assistant Mr. Poppy (Mark Wootton) fuelling his 'little white lie' Maddens suddenly finds himself a local celebrity and at the centre of quarrelling parents and over-excited children desperate in their bid for fame and fortune. Now Maddens' only hope is to get back in touch with Jennifer and lure Hollywood to town so that everybody's Christmas wishes come true.

  • Tokyo Story (Blu-ray + DVD) [1953] Tokyo Story (Blu-ray + DVD) | Blu Ray | (19/07/2010) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Yasujiro Ozu's most enduring masterpiece Tokyo Story is a beautifully nuanced exploration of filial duty expectation and regret. From the simple tale of the elderly Hirayma couple's visit to Tokyo to see their grown-up children Ozu draws a compelling contrast between the measured dignity of age and the hurried insensitivity of a younger generation. A constant fixture of critics' polls Tokyo Story is now available for the first time on Blu-ray from the BFI. Also contains full length feature Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family a sharp critique of bourgeois frivolity as an extra.

  • The Straight Story The Straight Story | DVD | (12/05/2008) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Alvin's eyesight is poor he has little money and he can't stand the thought if being driven anywhere. So when he discovers his estranged brother has suffered a stroke he decides to make the journey by the only means of transport available to him - a John Deere lawnmower. Hundreds of miles six weeks and several breakdowns later Alvin Straight finally pulls up at his destination where the fate of his brother awaits him.

  • It's A Wonderful Life (Colourised) [DVD] It's A Wonderful Life (Colourised) | DVD | (02/11/2009) from £4.99  |  Saving you £13.00 (72.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Hollywood's best-loved star teams up with America's favourite director to create one of the world's most popular films. It's A Wonderful Life is the ultimate 'feel-good' film. Starring the unforgettable James Stewart as George Bailey the man who receives the greatest Christmas gift of all. A superb ensemble cast includes Donna Reed and Lionel Barrymore this high-spirited Christmas tale is directed by the immortal Frank Capra and ranks as an all-time favourite of fans and critics alike. It's A Wonderful Life began as a short Christmas tale called 'The Greatest Gift'. The premise was simple: A regretful man sees what would have become of his family and friends if he had never lived. Yet various writers struggled to balance the story's pathos and humour. Only Capra's painstaking polishing made the script filmable with enriched characters and plot adding hugely to its depth and drama. When James Stewart first read the script he said 'This is it! When do we start?

  • Henry V [1944] Henry V | DVD | (17/03/2003) from £4.59  |  Saving you £5.40 (54.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    The definitive call to arms, Laurence Olivier's Henry V is a patriotic saga awash with pageantry, battles, romance and political chicanery. Intended to rally Britain during the darkest days of World War II, the film shows how the star of England sought to stake an ancestral, royal claim on the soil of France. Olivier once said, famously, that "it isn't until you're older that you can understand the pictorial beauty of heroism". And at the ripe age of 37, the actor essays an insouciant character endowed with great powers of strength, spirit, and intellect. From the moment Olivier strides on screen, the audience is held both rapt and willingly captive. During his magnificent "St. Crispin's Day" speech, Olivier refuses to indulge in excessive personal close-ups, choosing instead to depict the communal impact of his words on the troops. Though he understands the importance of clear, realistic communication, Olivier the director also displays a penchant for artifice--as exemplified by his decision to open the film in a replica of the Globe Theatre. The play's various diplomatic exchanges--usually of the dull, obligatory variety--are enlivened through touches of light comedy: a sly wind blows court papers over the set as courtiers argue over boundaries and treaties. There is also humour to be found in the King's taciturn romancing of Princess Katharine (Renée Asherson). But there are also plenty of large-scale events, with Olivier demonstrating the fleetness of Shakespeare's world even as he mimics the headlong rush of destruction. A romanticised film of a nation at war, the director leaves no doubt that the British victory over the French at Agincourt (1415) was Medieval England's and the King's finest military triumph. The film is rendered complete by William Walton's magnificent score, which pushes all the appropriate patriotic buttons. For his efforts, Olivier received a special Oscar "for his outstanding achievement as actor, producer, and director in bringing Henry V to the screen". --Kevin Mulhall

  • A Tale Of Two Cities [1958] A Tale Of Two Cities | DVD | (11/06/2007) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Dickens' epic tale set during the French Revolution follows the fortunes of a disillusioned English lawyer Sidney Carton (Dirk Bogarde) whose solace is drink and who bears an uncanny resemblance to a young French aristocrat named Darnay. Carton defends Darnay but ends up falling in love with Darnay's fiancee Lucy. When Darnay is imprisoned by the revolutionary mob Carton is given the chance to redeem himself as he leaves for Paris for Darnay's aid. A truly gripping tale incompar

  • Dreamer [2005] Dreamer | DVD | (13/02/2006) from £4.39  |  Saving you £15.60 (78.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Ben Crane (Kurt Russell) was once a great horseman whose gifts as a trainer are now being wasted on making other men's fortunes. Sonador called 'Sonya' was once a great horse whose promising future on the racetrack was suddenly cut short by a career-ending broken leg. Considered as good as dead to her owner who also happens to be Ben's boss Sonya is given to Ben as severance pay along with his walking papers. Now it will take the unwavering faith and determination of Ben's youn

  • You Again [DVD] [2010] You Again | DVD | (28/03/2011) from £4.33  |  Saving you £5.51 (55.20%)  |  RRP £9.99

    When a young woman realizes her brother is about to marry the girl who bullied her in high school she sets out to expose the fiance's true colors.

  • The Prince And Me 3 - A Royal Honeymoon [2008] The Prince And Me 3 - A Royal Honeymoon | DVD | (01/12/2008) from £2.76  |  Saving you £10.23 (78.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Six months after their marriage the newly crowned king of Denmark Prince Edvard and his wife Dr. Paige Morgan (once a farm girl from Wisconsin) are finally able to leave on their long-planned honeymoon. However once they get to their dream location not everything goes to plan! Running into Edvard's nemesis Paige's ex and saving the forest are just a few things standing in the way of their dream honeymoon.

  • The Importance Of Being Earnest [2002] The Importance Of Being Earnest | DVD | (21/07/2003) from £9.99  |  Saving you £-1.15 (-7.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest revolves around the clever scheming of two friends Algernon Moncrieff (Rupert Everett) and Jack Worthing (Colin Firth) both of whom lead double lives in order to increase their opportunities for pleasure. Jack who lives in the country comes to London as often as he can to look after his wicked invented brother Earnest while Algernon creates an invalid friend called Bunbury whose constant illnesses allow him to escape family pressures

  • My Favourite Wife [1940] My Favourite Wife | DVD | (04/04/2005) from £6.87  |  Saving you £9.12 (57.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The funniest fastest honeymoon ever screened! Ellen Arden (Irene Dunne) has been shipwrecked for seven years but returns to discover her husband Nick (Cary Grant) has had her declared dead and remarried. She wants her man back and makes him jealous over Stephen (Randolph Scott) a man with whom she was shipwrecked. After all these years can true love still find its way? Leo McCarey's My Favourite Wife puts the wide-ranging comedic talents of Grant and Dunne to hilarious use.

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