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  • The Death of Stalin [Blu-ray] [2017] The Death of Stalin | Blu Ray | (26/02/2018) from £11.48  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The internal political landscape of 1950's Soviet Russia takes on darkly comic form in a new film by Emmy award-winning and Oscar-nominated writer/director Armando Iannucci. In the days following Stalin's collapse, his core team of ministers tussle for control; some want positive change in the Soviet Union, others have more sinister motives. Their one common trait? They're all just desperately trying to remain alive. A film that combines comedy, drama, pathos and political manoeuvring, The Death of Stalin is a Quad and Main Journey production, directed by Armando Iannucci, and produced by Yann Zenou, Kevin Loader, Nicolas Duval Assakovsky, and Laurent Zeitoun. The script is written by Iannucci, David Schneider and Ian Martin, with additional material by Peter Fellows.

  • Bad Moms [DVD] Bad Moms | DVD | (26/12/2016) from £4.19  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Jon Lucas and Scott Moore co-write and direct this American comedy starring Mila Kunis, Christina Applegate and Kristen Bell. Amy Mitchell (Kunis) is a 32-year-old, happily married, committed mother-of-two who works as a sales rep for a coffee company. But after finding out her husband is cheating on her, Amy becomes fed up with her stressful life and decides to take action. She quits the PTA in protest of its overbearing leader Gwendolyn (Applegate) and gets together with some of her fellow mothers for a wild and liberating night on the town. Along with town outcast and single mum Carla (Kathryn Hahn) and worn out mother-of-four Kiki (Bell), Amy hits the bars for an all-night bender that allows the trio to let loose in a wild, indulgent trip of liberation before deciding to make some important changes to their lives, including tackling Gwendolyn head-on.

  • Hairspray (2007) Hairspray (2007) | DVD | (19/11/2007) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    It's rare that a movie captures the intensity and excitement of a live Broadway musical production while appealing to a broader movie-going audience, but the 2007 Hairspray is an energetic, powerfully moving film that does just that. A re-make of the 1988 musical film Hairspray the new Hairspray is a film adaptation of the 2002 Broadway musical and features more likeable characters than the original film and an incredible energy that stems from a great cast, fabulous new music, and the influence of musical producer Craig Zadan. What remains constant throughout all three versions of Hairspray is the story's thought-provoking exploration of prejudice and racism. Set in Baltimore in 1962, the film opens with chubby girl Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky) singing her heart out in a rendition of "Good Morning Baltimore" that, while admittedly a bit too long, sets the farcical tone for the film. Viewers quickly become immersed in Tracy's teenage world of popular television dance shows, big hair, the stigma of being different, and the first hesitant steps toward racial integration within a segregated world. The Corny Collins (James Marsdon) television dance show is a teenage obsession in Tracy's world and Link Larkin (Zac Efron) is every girl's dream partner, so when a call for auditions goes out, Tracy skips school to try out, but is rejected by station manager Velma von Tussle (Michelle Pfeiffer) because of her large size and the threat of competition for Velma's own daughter Amber (Brittany Snow). Perseverance and the support of her friend Penny (Amanda Bynes), father Wilbur (Christopher Walken), and negro dancer Seaweed (Elijah Kelley) lead Tracy to the spotlight and the chance of a lifetime, but more and more Tracy discovers that fairness and equality for those who are different does not come without a fight and that sacrifices must be made to effect change. While the message is serious, Hairspray is first and foremost a comedy with stellar performances by John Travolta as Edna Turnblad (who ever imagined Saturday Night Fever's iconic star would appear onscreen as a woman?), Christopher Walken, and Michelle Pfeiffer. Part of what makes Hairspray so powerful is the exceptional music composed by Marc Shaiman, including songs newly composed for the movie like "Ladies' Choice," "The New Girl in Town," and "Come So Far," and the awesome vocal talents of Queen Latifah (Motormouth Maybelle) and a cast of heretofore musically-unknown actors like Nikki Blonsky, Zac Efron, and Brittany Snow who really can sing. Notable trivia includes Jerry Stiller's appearance in both versions of the film (as Wilbur in the 1988 film and as Mr. Pinky in this 2007 rendition), and a cameo appearance by 1988 director and screenplay writer John Waters. Hairspray is one of the best films of the year--it's powerfully moving entertainment that leaves you energized and motivated to fight for what you believe in. --Tami Horiuchi

  • Eddie The Eagle [DVD] [2016] Eddie The Eagle | DVD | (08/08/2016) from £4.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring Taron Egerton (Kingsman: The Secret Service) and Hugh Jackman (Wolverine) comes Eddie The Eagle, a story following Michael Edwards (a.k.a Eddie), and his unflinching determination to become Great Britain's first Olympic ski-jumper. Reluctantly aided by former ski-jumper Bronson Peary as his coach, Eddie is unwavering in his quest to reach the 1988 Calgary Winter Games. Eddie the Eagle is an uplifting, inspirational story that celebrates human spirit, passion, and one man's refusal to accept defeat. Directed by Dexter Fletcher (Sunshine on Leith) and produced by Matthew Vaughn (Kingsman: The Secret Service). Also starring Jo Hartley (?This Is England'), Tim McInnerny (?Blackadder'), Keith Allen (?Robin Hood'), Iris Berban (?Rosa Roth') and Rune Temte (?The Last Kingdom'), Christopher Walken (?Catch Me If You Can') and Jim Broadbent (?Bridget Jones' Diary').

  • Pretty Woman [1990] Pretty Woman | DVD | (12/09/2005) from £3.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (73.40%)  |  RRP £14.99

  • Notting Hill [1999] Notting Hill | DVD | (15/11/1999) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    They don't really make many romantic comedies like Notting Hill anymore--blissfully romantic, sincerely sweet, and not grounded in any reality whatsoever. Pure fairy tale, and with a huge debt to Roman Holiday, Notting Hill ponders what would happen if a beautiful, world-famous person were to suddenly drop into your life unannounced and promptly fall in love with you. That's the crux of the situation for William Thacker (Hugh Grant), who owns a travel bookshop in London's fashionable Notting Hill district. Hopelessly ordinary (well, as ordinary as you can be when you're Hugh Grant), William is going about his life when renowned movie star Anna Scott (Julia Roberts) walks into his bookstore and into his heart. After another contrived meeting involving spilled orange juice, William and Anna share a spontaneous kiss (big suspension of disbelief required here), and soon both are smitten. The question is, of course, can William and Anna reconcile his decidedly commonplace bookseller existence and her lifestyle as a jet-setting, paparazzi-stalked celebrity? (Take a wild guess at the answer.) Smartly scripted by Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral) and directed by Roger Michell (Persuasion), Notting Hill is hardly realistic, but as wish fulfilment and a romantic comedy, it's irresistible. True, Roberts doesn't really have to stretch very far to play a big-time actress who makes $15 million per movie, but she's more winning and relaxed than she's been in years, and Grant is sweetly understated as a man blindsided by love. Together, in moments of quiet, they're a charming couple, and you can feel her craving for real love and his awe and amazement at the wonderful person for whom he has fallen. The only blight on the film is its overbearing pop soundtrack, though Elvis Costello's heart-wrenching version of "She" gets poignant exposure. With Rhys Ifans as Grant's scene-stealing, slovenly housemate and Alec Baldwin in a sly, perfectly cast cameo. --Mark Englehart

  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel [DVD] The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | DVD | (29/06/2015) from £2.98  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    While preparing for his imminent marriage to the love of his life Sunaina (Tina Desai). Sonny (Dev Patel) has his eye on a promising property now that his first venture The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the Elderly and Beautiful has only a single remaining vacancy – posing a rooming predicament for fresh arrivals Guy (Richard Gere) and Lavinia (Tamsin Greig). Evelyn and Douglas (Judi Dench and Bill Nighy) have now joined the Jaipur workforce while Norman and Carol (Ronald Pickup and Diana Hardcastle) are negotiating the tricky waters of an exclusive relationship as Madge (Celia Imrie) juggles two eligible and very wealthy suitors. And newly installed co-manager of the hotel Muriel (Maggie Smith) knows everyone's secrets. As the demands of a traditional Indian wedding threaten to engulf them all an unexpected way forward presents itself.

  • School of Rock [2004] School of Rock | DVD | (12/07/2004) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Turbo-charged comic Jack Black shakes School of Rock to its foundations, wailing with born-again metalhead passion as Dewey Finn, a guitarist who gets kicked out of a band because he grandstands too much--or, to put it another way, enjoys himself. Through an intercepted phone call, Finn gets a job as a substitute teacher for a fifth grade class at a private grade school. Neither students nor teacher quite know what to do with each other until Finn discovers that some of his young charges can play instruments; at once he starts turning them into a blistering rock & roll troupe that can crush his former band at an upcoming competition. School of Rock is silly and formulaic, but director Richard Linklater (Dazed and Confused), writer Mike White (The Good Girl), and especially Black and co-star Joan Cusack invest the formulas with such glee that the movie is irresistibly fun. --Bret Fetzer On the DVD: Like the movie, the DVD extras are smarter and a lot more entertaining than your average flick. The making-of feature ("Lessons Learned") has the usual behind-the-scenes banter but Jack Black is in fine form--that is, something special--interviewing as much as being interviewed about the making of the film. His unique pitch to Led Zeppelin to use their song is alone worth the price of the DVD. Black is more his maniacal self and a bit more grating in MTV's Diary segment, but his commentary track with director Richard Linklater is as insightful as it is funny. Ok, it's a lot more funny, but entertaining throughout. The commentary track featuring just the kid actors is less so, but any preteen would love listening to it. To top it off, the DVD-ROM has Dewey Finn's instantly famous blackboard history of rock. You can drill down to the bands mentioned and get a brief history of each. --Doug Thomas

  • Bridesmaids [DVD] Bridesmaids | DVD | (14/11/2011) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Kristen Wiig leads the cast as Annie, a maid of honor whose life unravels as she leads her best friend, Lillian (Maya Rudolph), and a group of colorful bridesmaids (Rose Byrne, Melissa McCarthy, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ellie Kemper) on a wild ride down the road to matrimony.Annie's life is a mess. But when she finds out her lifetime best friend is engaged, she simply must serve as Lillian's maid of honor. Though lovelorn and broke, Annie bluffs her way through the expensive and bizarre rituals. With one chance to get it perfect, she'll show Lillian and her bridesmaids just how far you'll go for someone you love.

  • How To Be Single [DVD] [2016] How To Be Single | DVD | (27/06/2016) from £4.79  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    There's a right way to be single, a wrong way to be single, and then there's Alice. Robin. Lucy. Meg. Tom. David. New York City is full of lonely hearts seeking the right match, be it a love connection, a hook-up, or something in the middle. And somewhere between the teasing texts and one-night stands, what these unmarried all have in common is the need to learn how to be single in a world filled with ever-evolving definitions of love. Sleeping around in the city that never sleeps was never so much fun.

  • Snatched [DVD] [2017] Snatched | DVD | (11/09/2017) from £6.85  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    After her boyfriend dumps her on the eve of their exotic vacation, impetuous dreamer Emily Middleton (Amy Schumer) persuades her ultra-cautious mother, Linda (Goldie Hawn) to travel with her to paradise. Emily and Linda realise that working through their differences as mother and daughter - in unpredictable, hilarious fashion - is the only way to escape their outrageous jungle adventure.

  • Keeping Mum [2005] Keeping Mum | DVD | (20/03/2006) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A hardworking vicar fails to notice that his wife is having an affair with her golf instructor. With both parents pre-occupied the services of a nanny are drafted in to calm the busy household and keep the kids in check

  • Elf [2003] Elf | DVD | (08/11/2004) from £3.69  |  Saving you £6.30 (63.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Elf is genuinely good. Not just Saturday Night Live-movie good, when the movie has some funny bits but is basically an insult to humanity; Elf is a smartly written, skillfully directed, and deftly acted story of a human being adopted by Christmas elves who returns to the human world to find his father. And because the writing, directing, and acting are all genuinely good, Elf is also genuinely funny. Will Ferrell, as Buddy the adopted elf, is hysterically sincere. James Caan, as his rediscovered father, executes his surly dumbfoundedness with perfect aplomb. Zooey Deschanel, as a department store worker with whom Buddy falls in love, is adorably sardonic. Director Jon Favreau (Swingers) shepherds the movie through all the obligatory Christmas cliches and focuses on material that's sometimes subtle and consistently surprising. Frankly, Elf feels miraculous. Also featuring Mary Steenburgen, Bob Newhart, Peter Dinklage, and Ed Asner as Santa Claus. --Bret Fetzer

  • Letters to Juliet [DVD] Letters to Juliet | DVD | (04/10/2010) from £3.49  |  Saving you £16.50 (82.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    On holiday in romantic Verona Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) explores the city alone as her fianc'' (Gael Garcia Bernal) spends his time working. Mesmerized by the wall of letters in Juliet Capulet's Courtyard she soon befriends the secretaries of Juliet who diligently answer them every day. When Sophie finds a decades-old unanswered letter she responds herself. To her surprise the author Claire (Vanessa Redgrave) and her uptight grandson (Christopher Egan) arrive and sweep her along on a romantic adventure she could never have imagined...

  • When Harry Met Sally [1989] When Harry Met Sally | DVD | (23/07/2001) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Highly influential, When Harry Met Sally revitalised (in 1988) the moribund romantic comedy genre, made a superstar of Meg Ryan, and in two minutes of heavy breathing gave cinema one of its most memorable scenes. Set over 12 years in New York, young professionals Harry (Billy Crystal) and Sally (Ryan) go from meeting to becoming friends to, well--this is a romantic comedy. Benefiting from an observant and witty script by Nora Ephron, it also offers insight into the differences between men and women. More importantly it's very funny, though the most hilarious scene is also the least believable: Sally is really too conventional to do that in a crowded restaurant. Knowingly modern, the picture's snappy one liners, neurotic honesty and straight-to-camera interludes are in the tradition of Woody Allen's New York Jewish humour, a prime example being Annie Hall (1976), while the inspired use of standards not only made a star of Harry Connick Jnr. but started a trend developed in Everyone Says I Love You (1996) and Love's Labour's Lost (2000). Perfectly played, with excellent support from Carrie Fisher, When Harry Met Sally is the archetypal modern romantic comedy. On the DVD: There's an excellent 33-minute documentary made in 2000 which interviews all the key players talking candidly not so much about how the film was made but why, and revealing just how much of it is actually based upon director Rob Reiner and star Billy Crystal's own experiences and personalities (the story about Reiner acting out the fake orgasm scene for Meg Ryan is priceless). There are seven short deleted scenes (easy to see why they didn't make the final cut) and a commentary track by Reiner, which contains a lot of space and does little more than repeat the information in the documentary. The anamorphically enhanced 1.77: 1 picture though a touch grainy in dark scenes is generally rich and detailed with excellent colour. Audio is stereo, and only blossoms when there is a song on the soundtrack. There are 14 subtitle options including English for Hard of Hearing.--Gary S Dalkin

  • My Big Fat Greek Wedding [2002] My Big Fat Greek Wedding | DVD | (24/03/2003) from £3.59  |  Saving you £16.40 (82.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Love is here to stay; so is her family! A young Greek woman falls in love with a non-Greek and struggles to get her family to accept him while she comes to terms with her heritage and cultural identity.

  • Guest House Paradiso [1999] Guest House Paradiso | DVD | (13/11/2000) from £4.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Richie and Eddie are running the nastiest smellist most squalid hotel in the world and things aren't going well. The Chef's guzzled all the food cash is running low and most of the guests have fled without paying! But things are on the up with the arrival of the Nice family some exotic underwear and the sexy Italian movie star Gina Carbonara. Richie is soon indulging his passion for panty pilfering whilst desperately trying to impress the fragrant Ms. Carbonara. But with Gina's

  • East Is East East Is East | DVD | (17/09/2007) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    George Khan proud Pakistani and chip shop owner rules his family with a rod of iron. He thinks he's raising his seven children to be respectable Pakistanis - but this is Salford in the North of England in 1971. For the seven kids of George Khan life is one long compromise. Tomboy Meenah prefers playing footie to wearing a sari hippie Saleem pretends to be studying engineering when he's really at art school heart throb Tariq has got a reputation as a local Casanova and Sajid has

  • Love Actually [2003] Love Actually | DVD | (19/03/2004) from £3.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    With no fewer than eight couples vying for our attention, Love Actually is like the London Marathon of romantic comedies, and everybody wins. Having mastered the genre as the writer of Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Bridget Jones's Diary, it appears that first-time director Richard Curtis is just like his screenplays: he just wants to be loved, and he'll go to absurdly appealing lengths to win our affection. With Love Actually, Curtis orchestrates a minor miracle of romantic choreography, guiding a brilliant cast of stars and newcomers as they careen toward love and holiday cheer in London, among them the Prime Minister (Hugh Grant) who's smitten with his caterer (Martine McCutcheon); a widower (Liam Neeson) whose young son nurses the ultimate schoolboy crush; a writer (Colin Firth) who falls for his Portuguese housekeeper; a devoted wife and mother (Emma Thompson) coping with her potentially unfaithful husband (Alan Rickman); and a lovelorn American (Laura Linney) who's desperately attracted to a colleague. There's more--too much more--as Curtis wraps his Christmas gift with enough happy endings to sweeten a dozen other movies. That he pulls it off so entertainingly is undeniably impressive; that he does it so shamelessly suggests that his writing fares better with other, less ingratiating directors. --Jeff Shannon

  • Dogma [1999] Dogma | DVD | (21/10/2002) from £3.59  |  Saving you £6.40 (64.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Bored of being eternally banished to earth, two errant angels hatch a plan to sneak back into heaven. Unfortunately, if they use the required loophole in religious Dogma, they'll prove God fallible and undo the very fabric of the universe, ending all existence. Bummer. Enter the distant grand niece of Jesus Christ and an army of angels, beautiful mythical figures, saintly apostles and all entities good and holy. And Jay and Silent Bob. The phrase "it's a religious comedy" must have caused Hollywood to have a sacred cow. And, as Smith's first attempt to move away from the early lo-fi, character-centred, relationship-based comedies (Clerks, Mallrats and Chasing Amy) toward the narrative-led big-budget spectacular, Dogma is not without problems. Proving controversial on release, stones were cast by churchgoers and Smith devotees alike. Frothing-mouthed extremists levelled charges of blasphemy at the more colourful elements (a Malcolm X-style 13th apostle, the crucifix being binned as uncool and God not being a white-bearded patriarch), leaving the devoutly Catholic Smith, who's intentions were to celebrate the mystery and beauty of religion, completely bemused. Equally, the Luddite Clerks obsessives who wrote it off as "Smith-gone-Hollywood" should have recognised that the script was written way before he gave us his black-and-white debut. More ambitious than his previous mates-roped-in cheapies, the apocryphal and apocalyptic Dogma is still blessed with water-into-wine performances, pop culture gags, postmodern self-referencing and stoopid shagging jokes. Though it may not be wholly miraculous, this is still a righteous movie; and, in comparison with the average big-buck formulaic Hollywood evil, it's practically saintly.On the DVD: Dogma's budget outstripped the early Smith films by miles, and the 2.35:1 Anamorphic Widescreen transfer does it justice, with divine colour and heavenly sound. The picture quality of the extras--including trailers, TV spots and cast and crew interviews--is not so good and pixilation occurs throughout. The interviews are provocative enough, though, giving huge insight into the film. And it's quite something to see Smith looking all "Clark Kent" in his civvies. --Paul Eisinger

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