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  • Silent Hill [UMD Mini for PSP] Silent Hill | UMD | (07/12/2007) from £11.61  |  Saving you £-5.62 (-93.80%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Beowulf [UMD Mini for PSP] Beowulf | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £1.85  |  Saving you £-5.10 (-85.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The warrior Beowulf must fight and defeat the monster Grendel who is terrorizing towns, and later, Grendel's mother, who begins killing out of revenge. Manufacturer: Boulevard Entertainment

  • Van Helsing [UMD Universal Media Disc] Van Helsing | UMD | (05/09/2005) from £16.59  |  Saving you £3.40 (17.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Like a roller coaster ready to fly off its rails, Van Helsing rockets to maximum velocity and never slows down. Having earned blockbuster clout with The Mummy and The Mummy Returns, writer-director Stephen Sommers once again plunders Universal's monster vault and pulls out all the stops for this mammoth $148-million action-adventure-horror-comedy, which opens (sans credits) with a terrific black-and-white prologue that pays homage to the Universal horror classics that inspired it. The plot pits legendary vampire hunter Van Helsing (Hugh Jackman) against Dracula (the deliciously campy Richard Roxburgh), his deadly blood-sucking brides, and the Wolfman (Will Kemp) in a two-hour parade of outstanding special effects (980 in all) that turn Sommers' juvenile plot into a triple-overtime bonus for CGI animators. In alliance with a Transylvanian princess (Kate Beckinsale) and the Frankenstein monster (Shuler Hensley), Van Helsing must prevent Dracula from hatching his bat-winged progeny, and there's so much good-humored action that you're guaranteed to be thrilled and exhausted by the time the 10-minute end-credits roll. It's loud, obnoxious, filled with revisionist horror folklore, and aimed at addicted gamers and eight-year-olds, but this colossal monster mash (including Mr. Hyde, just for kicks) will never, ever bore you. --Jeff Shannon

  • Blade 2 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Blade 2 | UMD | (26/09/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Underworld Special Edition [UMD Universal Media Disc] Underworld Special Edition | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Underworld is a hybrid thriller that rewrites the rulebook on werewolves and vampires--imagine Blade meets The Crow and The Matrix. It's a "cuisinart" movie (blend a lot of familiar ideas and hope something interesting happens) in which immortal vampire "death dealers" wage an ancient war against "Lycans" (werewolves), who've got centuries of revenge--and some rather ambitious genetic experiments--on their lycanthropic agenda. Given his preoccupation with gloomy architecture (mostly filmed in Budapest, Hungary), frenetic mayhem and Gothic costuming, it's no surprise that first-time director Len Wiseman gained experience in TV commercials and the art departments of Godzilla, Men in Black and Independence Day. His work is all surface, no substance, filled with derivative, grand-scale action as conflicted vampire Selene (Kate Beckinsale, who later became engaged to Wiseman) struggles to rescue an ill-fated human (Scott Speedman) from Lycan transformation. It's great looking all the way, and a guaranteed treat for horror buffs, who will eagerly dissect its many strengths and weaknesses. --Jeff Shannon

  • Resident Evil: Apocalypse [UMD Universal Media Disc] Resident Evil: Apocalypse | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £2.69  |  Saving you £1.38 (7.70%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Constantine [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] Constantine | UMD | (25/11/2005) from £11.59  |  Saving you £1.40 (10.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Blade [UMD Universal Media Disc] Blade | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £11.99  |  Saving you £6.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The recipe for Blade is quite simple; you take one part Batman, one part horror flick, and two parts kung fu and frost it all over with some truly campy acting. What do you get? An action flick that will reaffirm your belief that the superhero action genre did not die in the fluorescent hands of Joel Schumacher. Blade is the story of a ruthless and supreme vampire slayer (Wesley Snipes) who makes other contemporary slayers (Buffy et al.) look like amateurs. Armed with a samurai sword made of silver and guns that shoot silver bullets, he lives to hunt and kill "Sucker Heads". Pitted against our hero is a cast of villains led by Deacon Frost (Stephen Dorff), a crafty and charismatic vampire who believes that his people should be ruling the world, and that the human race is merely the food source they prey on. Born half-human and half-vampire after his mother had been attacked by a blood-sucker, Blade is brought to life by a very buff-looking Snipes in his best action performance to date. Apparent throughout the film is the fluid grace and admirable skill that Snipes brings to the many breathtaking action sequences that lift this movie into a league of its own. The influence of Hong Kong action cinema is clear, and you may even notice vague impressions of Japanese anime sprinkled innovatively throughout. Dorff holds his own against Snipes as the menacing nemesis Frost, and the grizzly Kris Kristofferson brings a tough, cynical edge to his role as Whistler, Blade's mentor and friend. Ample credit should also go to director Stephen Norrington and screenwriter David S. Goyer, who prove it is possible to adapt comic book characters to the big screen without making them look absurd. Indeed, quite the reverse happens here: Blade comes vividly to life from the moment you first see him, in an outstanding opening sequence that sets the tone for the action-packed film that follows. From that moment onward you are pulled into the world of Blade and his perpetual battle against the vampire race. --Jeremy Storey

  • Wolf Creek [UMD Universal Media Disc] Wolf Creek | UMD | (16/01/2006) from £1.49  |  Saving you £2.44 (13.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Cursed [UMD Universal Media Disc] Cursed | UMD | (03/10/2005) from £4.43  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £18.99

  • Final Destination 2 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Final Destination 2 | UMD | (30/01/2006) from £4.95  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Final Destination [UMD Universal Media Disc] Final Destination | UMD | (30/01/2006) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Resident Evil - Extinction [UMD Mini for PSP] [2007] Resident Evil - Extinction | UMD | (18/02/2008) from £14.61  |  Saving you £-1.62 (-12.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • 13 Ghosts [UMD Universal Media Disc] 13 Ghosts | UMD | (03/10/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Halloween [UMD Universal Media Disc] Halloween | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £14.61  |  Saving you £-8.62 (-143.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Halloween is as pure and undiluted as its title. In the small town of Haddonfield, Illinois, a teenage baby sitter tries to survive a Halloween night of relentless terror, during which a knife-wielding maniac goes after the town's hormonally charged youths. Director John Carpenter takes this simple situation and orchestrates a superbly mounted symphony of horrors. It's a movie much scarier for its dark spaces and ominous camera movements than for its explicit bloodletting (which is actually minimal). Composed by Carpenter himself, the movie's freaky music sets the tone; and his script (cowritten with Debra Hill) is laced with references to other horror pictures, especially Psycho. The baby sitter is played by Jamie Lee Curtis, the real-life daughter of Psycho victim Janet Leigh; and the obsessed policeman played by Donald Pleasence is named Sam Loomis, after John Gavin's character in Psycho. In the end, though, Halloween stands on its own as an uncannily frightening experience--it's one of those movies that had audiences literally jumping out of their seats and shouting at the screen. ("No! Don't drop that knife!") Produced on a low budget, the picture turned a monster profit, and spawned many sequels, none of which approached the 1978 original. Curtis returned for two more instalments: 1981's dismal Halloween II, which picked up the story the day after the unfortunate events, and 1998's occasionally gripping Halloween H20, which proved the former baby sitter was still haunted after 20 years. --Robert Horton

  • Hellraiser [UMD Universal Media Disc] Hellraiser | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £3.49  |  Saving you £-1.62 (-12.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Having made his reputation as one of the most prolific and gifted horror writers of his generation (prompting Stephen King to call him "the future of horror"), Clive Barker made a natural transition to movies with this audacious directorial debut from 1987. Not only did Barker serve up a chilling tale of devilish originality, he also introduced new icons of horror that since have become as popular among genre connoisseurs as Frankenstein's monster and the Wolfman. Foremost among these frightful visions is the sadomasochistic demon affectionately named Pinhead (so named because his pale, bald head is a geometric pincushion and a symbol of eternal pain). Pinhead is the leader of the Cenobites, agents of evil who appear only when someone successfully "solves" the exotic puzzle box called the Lamont Configuration--a mysterious device that opens the door to Hell. The puzzle's latest victim is Frank (Sean Chapman), who now lives in a gelatinous skeletal state in an upstairs room of the British home just purchased by his newlywed half-brother (Andrew Robinson, best known as the villain from Dirty Harry), who has married one of Frank's former lovers (Claire Higgins). The latter is recruited to supply the cannibalistic Frank with fresh victims, enabling him to reconstitute his own flesh--but will Frank succeed in restoring himself completely? Will Pinhead continue to demonstrate the flesh-ripping pleasures of absolute agony? Your reaction to this description should tell you if you've got the stomach for Barker's film, which has since spawned a number of interesting but inferior sequels. It's definitely not for everyone, but there's no denying that it's become a semiclassic of modern horror. --Jeff Shannon

  • Amityville Horror [UMD Universal Media Disc] Amityville Horror | UMD | (24/10/2005) from £3.95  |  Saving you £0.62 (3.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    There's no place like home...for bloodcurdling horror! James Brolin Margot Kidder and Academy Award winner Rod Steiger fall prey to the powers of darkness in this spine-tingling tale of a house possessed by unspeakable evil. One of the most talked-about haunted-house stories of all time The Amityville Horror will hit you where you live. For George and Kathy Lutz the colonial home on the river's edge seemed ideal: quaint spacious and amazingly affordable. Of course six brutal murders had taken place there just a year before but houses don't have memories....or do they? Soon the Lutz dream house becomes a hellish nightmare as walls begin to drip blood and satanic forces threaten to destroy them. Now the Lutzes must try to escape or forfeit their lives - and their souls!

  • Children Of The Corn [UMD Universal Media Disc] Children Of The Corn | UMD | (29/08/2005) from £4.99  |  Saving you £-8.62 (-143.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Hostel [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] Hostel | UMD | (01/01/1980) from £14.90  |  Saving you £-1.91 (-14.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Resident Evil [UMD Universal Media Disc] Resident Evil | UMD | (05/09/2005) from £1.69  |  Saving you £10.40 (47.30%)  |  RRP £21.99

    Given that Resident Evil is a Paul Anderson movie based on a computer game which was itself highly derivative (especially of George A Romero and James Cameron films), it's probably unfair to complain that it hasn't got an original idea or moment in its entire running time. In the early 1980s, Italian schlock films such as Zombie Flesh Eaters and Zombie Creeping Flesh tried to cram in as many moments restaged from American originals as possible, strung together by silly characters wandering between monster attacks. This is a much-improved, edited, photographed and directed version of the same gambit. As amnesiac Milla Jovovich remembers amazing kung fu skills and anti-globalist Eric Mabius mutters about evil corporations, a gang of clichéd soldiers without a distinguishing feature between them (except for Michelle Rodriguez as a secondary tough chick) are trapped in an underground scientific compound at the mercy of a tyrannical computer--which manifests as a smug little-girl-o-gram--fending off flesh-eating zombies (though gore fans will be disappointed by the film's need to stay within the limits of the 15 certificate) and CGI mutants, not to mention the ever-popular zombie dogs. It's tolerably action-packed, but zips past its borrowings (Aliens, Cube, Deep Blue Sea) without adding anything that future schlock pictures will want to imitate. -- Kim Newman

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