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  • The Shining [1980] The Shining | DVD | (10/09/2001) from £3.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (71.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Stanley Kubrick's The Shining is less an adaptation of Stephen King's best-selling horror novel than a complete re-imagining of it from the inside out. In King's book, the Overlook Hotel is a haunted place that takes possession of its off-season caretaker and provokes him to murderous rage against his wife and young son. Kubrick's film is an existential Road Runner cartoon (his steadicam scurrying through the hotel's labyrinthine hallways), in which the cavernously empty spaces inside the Overlook Hotel mirror the emptiness in the soul of the blocked writer settled in for a long winter's hibernation. As many have pointed out, King's protagonist goes mad, but Kubrick's Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) is Looney Tunes from the moment we meet him--all arching eyebrows and mischievous grin. (Both Nicholson and Shelley Duvall reach new levels of hysteria in their performances, driven to extremes by the director's fanatical demand s for take after take after take.) The Shining is terrifying--but not in the way fans of the novel might expect. When it was redone as a TV mini-series (reportedly because of King's dissatisfaction with the Kubrick film), the famous topiary-animal attack (which was deemed impossible to film in 1980) was there--but the deeper horror was lost. Kubrick's The Shining gets under your skin and chills your bones; it stays with you, inhabits you, haunts you. And there's no place to hide... --Jim Emerson, Amazon.com

  • The Shining [Blu-ray] [1980] The Shining | Blu Ray | (03/03/2008) from £7.99  |  Saving you £17.00 (68.00%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) becomes the caretaker of the Overlook Hotel up in the secluded mountains of Colorado. Jack being a family man takes his wife and son to the hotel to keep him company throughout the long and isolated nights. During their stay strange things occur when Jack's son Danny sees gruesome images powered by a force called The Shining and Jack is heavily affected by this. Along with writer's block and the demons of the hotel haunting him Jack has a complete mental breakdown and the situation takes a sinister turn for the worse. Please note: This is the UK theatrical cut with a run time of 115 minutes.

  • The Exorcist [1974] The Exorcist | DVD | (07/10/2002) from £4.39  |  Saving you £9.60 (68.60%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Director William Friedkin was a hot ticket in Hollywood after the success of The French Connection, and he turned heads (in more ways than one) when he decided to make The Exorcist as his follow-up film. Adapted by William Peter Blatty from his controversial best-seller, this shocking 1973 thriller set an intense and often-copied milestone for screen terror with its unflinching depiction of a young girl (Linda Blair) who is possessed by an evil spirit. Jason Miller and Max von Sydow are perfectly cast as the priests who risk their sanity and their lives to administer the rites of demonic exorcism, and Ellen Burstyn plays Blair's mother, who can only stand by in horror as her daughter's body is wracked by satanic disfiguration. One of the most frightening films ever made, The Exorcist was mysteriously plagued by troubles during production, and the years have not diminished its capacity to disturb even the most stoical viewers. --Jeff Shannon

  • A Cure for Wellness [DVD] [2017] A Cure for Wellness | DVD | (03/07/2017) from £8.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    From the visionary director of The Ring, comes this psychological thriller about an executive whose sanity is tested when he unravels the terrifying secrets of a remote retreat.

  • 28 Days Later ... [2002] 28 Days Later ... | DVD | (19/05/2003) from £2.49  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Anti-vivisection activists make a very bad judgment call and release an experimental monkey infected with "rage". 28 Days Later..., as the title has it, bicycle messenger Cillian Murphy wakes up from a post-traffic accident coma in a deserted London hospital, ventures out to find the city depopulated and the few remaining normal people doing everything to avoid the jittery, savage, zombie-like "infecteds" who attack on sight. Our bewildered hero has to adjust to the loss of his family and the entire world, but hooks up with several others--including a tough black woman (Naomie Harris) and a likable London cabbie (Brendan Gleeson)--on a perilous trip northwards, to seek refuge at army officer Christopher Eccleston's fortified retreat. However, even if they survive the plague, the future of humanity is still in doubt. Directed by Danny Boyle and scripted by novelist Alex Garland, this is a terrific SF/horror hybrid, evoking American and Italian zombie movies but also the very British end-of-the-world tradition of John Wyndham (Day of the Triffids) and Survivors. Shot on digital video, which gives the devastated cityscapes a closed-circuit-camera realism, this grips from the first, with its understandably extreme performances, its terrifyingly swift monster attacks and its underlying melancholy. Deliberately crude, 28 Days Later is also sometimes exceptionally subtle. --Kim Newman

  • House Of 1000 Corpses [2003] House Of 1000 Corpses | DVD | (29/03/2004) from £7.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    It's sick! It's twisted! It's House of 1,000 Corpses, and it's more fun than a wholesome bowl of "Agatha Crispies"! Dropped by two studios (Universal and MGM) and doomed to obscurity until Lions Gate Films gave it a limited theatrical release, Rob Zombie's gonzo horror flick is a blood-spattered throwback to the gore-fests of the 70s, lending new meaning to the term "box-office gross". Most critics misunderstood this unbridled exercise in graphic style and violence, but for devoted horror buffs it's a refreshing rebuttal to the comparatively "polite" frights of the post-Scream era. While paying homage to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Last House on the Left, Motel Hell and other gory classics, Zombie's ramshackle plot (two young couples are terrorized by an inbred family of homicidal maniacs) lacks a crucial sense of dread, but his pastiche of vivid colours, grainy fetish-films and photo-negative imagery is guaranteed to hold your attention. A bona-fide cult item, this House is definitely worth a visit... if you dare. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre [2003] The Texas Chainsaw Massacre | DVD | (29/03/2004) from £2.75  |  Saving you £17.24 (86.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The 2003 version of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre adheres to the pure-and-simple slasher-movie formula: introduce a gaggle of sexy young people, make vague gestures to distinguish them--Jessica Biel wants to get married and doesn't like pot, so she's our moral compass--then start hacking them to pieces one by one. The visual palette includes grimy crucified dolls, fly-specked pig carcasses, body parts floating in murky jars, a tobacco-chewing redneck sheriff and many slender beams of sunlight cutting through dank, dusty interiors. The camera lovingly photographs Biel's tank-topped bosom and sculpted abs as she's running in terror from a bloated, chainsaw-wielding, human-skin-wearing maniac. This remake lacks the macabre comedy of the original; it's all about the nauseating sensation of waiting for something to jump out of the dark. --Bret Fetzer

  • The Descent and The Descent Part 2 [DVD] [2009] The Descent and The Descent Part 2 | DVD | (12/04/2010) from £5.59  |  Saving you £17.40 (75.70%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Titles Comprise: The Descent: Afraid of the dark? You will be! When a young group of female friends go on a climbing expedition they find a lot more than they bargained for. Lost in a cave off the maps they encounter a race of barely human cannibalistic subterraneans who are very very hungry... The Descent 2: The chilling sequel to the critically acclaimed and globally successful horror hit The Descent. Dazed bloodied and speechless with trauma Sarah Carter (Shauna Macdonald) emerges alone from the Appalachian cave system where the events of The Descent took place. Local Sheriff Redmond Vaines forces her back underground to help the rescue team which is desperately searching for her five missing girlfriends. As the team move deeper into the caves Sarah's flashes of fractured memory intensify and she bgins to realise the full horror of the would-be rescue mission. Only Sarah knows the terror which lurks in the shadows of the caves. But they are about to encounter a new tribe of Crawlers inbred deformed and even more viciously feral than those Sarah faced before.

  • The Cell [2000] The Cell | DVD | (12/03/2001) from £5.69  |  Saving you £13.84 (69.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Schizoid serial killer Carl Stargher (Vincent D'Onofrio) has been captured at last, but a neurological seizure has rendered him comatose, and FBI agent Peter Novak (Vince Vaughan) has no way to determine the location of Stargher's latest and still-living victim. To probe the secrets contained in Stargher's traumatised psyche, the FBI recruits psychologist Catherine Deane (Jennifer Lopez), who has mastered a new technology that allows her to enter the mind of another person. What she finds in Stargher's head is a theatre of the grotesque, which, as envisioned by first-time director Tarsem Singh, is a smorgasbord of the surreal that borrows liberally from the Brothers Quay, Czech animator Jan Svankmajer, Hieronymous Bosch, Salvador Dali and a surplus of other cannibalised sources.This provides one of the wildest, weirdest visual feasts ever committed to film, and The Cell earns a place among such movie mind-trips as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Altered States, What Dreams May Come and Un Chien Andalou. Is this a good thing? Sure, if all you want is freakazoid eye-candy. If you're looking for emotional depth, substantial plot and artistic coherence, The Cell is sure to disappoint. The pop-psychology pablum of Mark Protosevich's screenplay would be laughable if it weren't given such sombre significance, and Singh's exploitative use of sadomasochistic imagery is repugnant (this movie makes Seven look tame), so you are better off marvelling at the nightmare visions that are realised with astonishing potency. The Cell is too shallow to stay in your head for long, but while it's there, it's one hell of a show.On the DVD Sounding more like a stand-up comedian than a serious filmmaker in his feature-length commentary, director Tarsem Singh (a veteran of glossy TV commercials and music videos) clearly reveals that dazzling visuals took priority over plot and character in The Cell. This emphasis is echoed throughout the DVD's bonus features, especially in a featurette "tribute" to Singh by primary members of his creative team. While the deleted scenes are interesting, they add nothing to the finished film, so it's easy to see why they were deleted. Detailed examination of the film's special effects offers a first-rate primer on the state of the art of digital imagery. To lend an air of scientific credibility to the film's basic premise, a brain map and "empathy test" are included, inviting viewers to take a multiple-choice quiz to determine their level of empathy and compassion toward other human beings. (The lower your score, presumably, the more you have in common with serial killers.) --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Ginger Snaps [2001] Ginger Snaps | DVD | (20/12/2002) from £9.50  |  Saving you £4.05 (28.90%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Written by Karen Walton and directed by John Fawcett, Ginger Snaps combines horror and pubescent angst in a thoughtful portrayal of female teenage development both socially and physically. The Fitzgerald sisters are alienated to the point of discussing honouring the suicide pact they made when they were eight, and producing disturbing mock-up photographs of their violent deaths. Then the slightly older Ginger is bitten by a werewolf and starts developing hair in odd places and feeling more alive than she has ever felt--but it's not entirely clear whether this is sexual maturity or monstrosity creeping up on her until she starts developing canines and a tail. The look and feel of the movie is a cross between Grimms's Fairytales and Neil Jordan's A Company of Wolves, while the influence of Buffy the Vampire Slayer runs through both script and cinematography--which means it occasionally looks like an extended episode of Buffy, minus the Vampire slayer herself. The performances of Emily Perkins as the nervy Goth Brigitte and of Katherine Isabelle as the extrovert charismatic Ginger are more or less faultless; we are taken to the heart of this claustrophobic relationship just as it starts to implode. Mimi Rogers as their ditzy mother and Kris Lemke as the stoner who tries to help Brigitte are almost equally excellent. On the DVD: The DVD includes as special features some impressive screen tests by Perkins and Isabelle in which we see them evolving their final takes on the characters; we also get a mildly interesting documentary on the construction of the werewolf Ginger becomes and a featurette that has some snappy one-liners from the cast, as well as production notes and cast notes. The Dolby sound catches the nervy grungy world of the film, which is presented in 16:9 ratio.--Rox Kaveney

  • Underworld - Rise Of The Lycans [Blu-ray] [2008] Underworld - Rise Of The Lycans | Blu Ray | (18/05/2009) from £3.89  |  Saving you £21.10 (84.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    A prequel to the last two Underworld movies this installment traces the beginnings of the blood-feud between the dominant Death Dealers and their former slaves the Lycans. Led by the forceful Lucian the Lycan uprising begins to take shape in order to escape the shackles of the evil Viktor the vampire king who rules them.

  • Dawn Of The Dead [2004] Dawn Of The Dead | DVD | (25/10/2004) from £3.99  |  Saving you £20.00 (83.40%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Are you ready to get down with the sickness? Movie logic dictates that you shouldn't remake a classic, but Zack Snyder's Dawn of the Dead defies that logic and comes up a winner. You could argue that George A. Romero's 1978 original was sacred ground for horror buffs, but it was a low-budget classic, and Snyder's action-packed upgrade benefits from the same manic pacing that energized Romero's continuing zombie saga. Romero's indictment of mega-mall commercialism is lost (it's arguably outmoded anyway), so Snyder and screenwriter James Gunn compensate with the same setting--in this case, a Milwaukee shopping mall under siege by cannibalistic zombies in the wake of a devastating viral outbreak--a well-chosen cast (led by Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames, Jake Weber, and Mekhi Phifer), some outrageously morbid humor, and a no-frills plot that keeps tension high and blood splattering by the bucketful. Horror buffs will catch plenty of tributes to Romero's film (including cameos by three of its cast members, including gore-makeup wizard Tom Savini), and shocking images are abundant enough to qualify this Dawn as an excellent zombie-flick double-feature with 28 Days Later, its de facto British counterpart. --Jeff Shannon

  • Evil Dead [Blu-ray] [2013] Evil Dead | Blu Ray | (12/08/2013) from £3.99  |  Saving you £19.00 (82.60%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Evil Dead the highly anticipated reboot of Sam Raimi's 1981 cult-hit horror film The Evil Dead is produced by the original team of Rob Tapert Sam Raimi (Spider Man 3) and Bruce Campbell (Spider Man 3) and features a fresh young cast. Evil Dead is a bone-chilling film that combines all the raw excitement and gleeful gore of the acclaimed original with a series of shocking new twists. A remote cabin in the woods becomes a blood-soaked chamber of horrors when a group of 20-something friends unwittingly awakens an ancient demon in Evil Dead. Mia (Jane Levy) a young woman whose life has been marred by loss and addiction asks her brother David (Shiloh Fernandez) his girlfriend Natalie (Elizabeth Blackmore) and their childhood friends Olivia (Jessica Lucas) and Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) to join her at the family's rustic cabin to help her overcome her demons. Once there she ceremoniously destroys the last of her stash and swears off drugs for good in front of her friends. Inside they are shocked to discover that the abandoned cabin has been broken into. The cellar has been transformed into a grotesque altar surrounded by dozens of mummified animals. Eric becomes fascinated with an ancient book he discovers there. In thrall to its mysterious contents he reads aloud from it never suspecting the terrifying consequences he is about to unleash.

  • Antichrist [DVD] [2009] Antichrist | DVD | (11/01/2010) from £5.98  |  Saving you £9.51 (59.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

  • Wolf Creek [Blu-ray] [2005] Wolf Creek | Blu Ray | (19/11/2007) from £3.59  |  Saving you £21.40 (85.60%)  |  RRP £24.99

    How can you be found when no one knows you're missing? Three friends on a road trip in the remote Australian Outback are plunged into danger when they accept help from a seemingly friendly local... Greg McLean's truly terrifying thriller is based in part on real events from the infamous 'Backpacker Murders' which plagued Australia's Hume Highway between 1989 and 1992.

  • Saw VI [DVD] [2009] Saw VI | DVD | (08/03/2010) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The Game Comes Full Circle Special Agent Strahm is dead and Detective Hoffman has emerged as the unchallenged successor to Jigsaw's legacy. However when the FBI draws closer to Hoffman he is forced to set a game into motion and Jigsaw's grand scheme is finally understood

  • The Company Of Wolves The Company Of Wolves | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £3.99  |  Saving you £12.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The desire.... The fantasy.... The nightmare.... Young Rosaleen (Sarah Patterson) lies dreaming in her bed. A violent nightmare transports her back in time to a world of primeval forests and werewolves. In this netherworld she learns that her only sister has been killed by a wolf. Her grandmother (Angela Lansbury) weaves vivid tales of folklore and fantasy with warnings of fantastic beasts that lurk within men and foretelling the fate of all young girls who stray from the path

  • The Collector [DVD] The Collector | DVD | (18/10/2010) from £2.78  |  Saving you £13.80 (76.70%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Desperate to repay his debt to his ex-wife an ex-con plots a heist at his new employer's country home unaware that a second criminal has also targeted the property and rigged it with a series of deadly traps.

  • Blade II [2002] Blade II | DVD | (30/09/2002) from £1.94  |  Saving you £17.50 (87.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Aptly described by critic Roger Ebert as "a vomitorium of viscera", Blade II takes the express route to sequel success. So if you enjoyed Blade, you'll probably drool over this monster mash, which is anything but boring. Set (and filmed) in Prague, the plot finds a new crop of "Reaper" vampires threatening to implement a viral breeding program, and they're nearly impervious to attacks by Blade (Wesley Snipes), his now-revived mentor Whistler (Kris Kristofferson), and a small army of "normal" vampires who routinely combust in a constant conflagration of spectacular special effects. It's up to Blade to conquer the über-vamps, and both Snipes and director Guillermo del Toro (Mimic) serve up a nonstop smorgasbord of intensely choreographed action, creepy makeup, and graphic ultra-violence, with the ever-imposing Ron Perlman as a vampire villain. It's sadistic, juvenile, numbing, and--for those who dig this kind of thing--undeniably impressive. --Jeff Shannon

  • Kill List [DVD] Kill List | DVD | (26/12/2011) from £4.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (68.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Ex-soldier turned contract killer, Jay (Neil Maskell), is pressured by his partner, Gal (Michael Smiley), into taking a new assignment. As they descend into the dark and disturbing world of the contract - aka the kill list - Jay begins to unravel once again - his fear and paranoia escalates.

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