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  • Rocky III [UMD Mini for PSP] [DVD] Rocky III | UMD | (19/12/2007) from £2.37  |  Saving you £-2.89 (-48.20%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Snatch [UMD Universal Media Disc] Snatch | UMD | (31/10/2005) from £15.48  |  Saving you £2.51 (14.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban [UMD Universal Media Disc] Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban | UMD | (20/03/2006) from £6.40  |  Saving you £17.59 (73.30%)  |  RRP £23.99

  • Matrix Revolutions [UMD Mini for PSP] Matrix Revolutions | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £7.97  |  Saving you £-1.98 (-33.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The opening reels of Matrix Revolutions do nothing to dispel the feeling of exhausted disappointment that set in during the second half of The Matrix Reloaded. There's plenty more talky guff combined with the picking-up of hard-to-remember plot threads as Neo (Keanu Reeves) lies in a coma in the "real" world and is stranded on a tube station in a limbo "beyond the Matrix" while his allies do a reprise of the shooting-their-way-past-the-bodyguards bit from the last film (this time, the baddies can walk on the ceiling). A new Oracle (Mary Alice) makes some pronouncements about the end being near and more things happen--including the evil Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) manifesting in reality by possessing a minor character and perfidiously blinding our hero, who wears a becoming ribbon over his wounded eyes and perceives the world in an impressive "flaming truth vision". What about the action? The equivalent of the last film's freeway chase scene is a huge face-off as the Sentinels (robot squids) finally breach the caverns of Zion, "the last human city", and swarm against a battalion of pilot-manipulated giant robots: here, the effects are seamless and the images astonishing, though the fact that none of the major characters are involved and the whole thing goes on so long as if designed to top any previous robot-on-robot screen carnage means that it becomes monotonously amazing, like watching someone else play a great computer game. After a too-easily-managed major realignment of the enmities, the film--and the series--finally delivers a sign-off sequence that's everything you could want as Neo and Smith get into a kung fu one-on-one in a rain-drenched virtual city, flying as high as Superman and Brainiac in smart suits. It comes too late to save the day and the wrap-up is both banal and incoherent, but at least this single combat is a reward for hardy veterans who've sat through seven hours of build-up. --Kim NewmanOn the DVD: when the first Matrix DVD was released, with never-before-seen features such as the "Follow the White Rabbit" option, it set a benchmark against which subsequent discs were judged. But neither sequel has lived up to the original's high standards. The Matrix Revolutions two-disc set is an unexceptional package, with a routine "making of" featurette being the main bonus item. Amid all the usual backslapping guff about how great everyone is and what a great time they've all had, it's possible to glean some nuggets of useful information about the baffling plot--though cast and crew can't repress a note of weariness creeping in when discussing the horribly protracted shooting schedule. The feature on the CG Revolution is the most informative for people who like to know how everything was done, and, in the same vein, there's also a multi-angle breakdown of the Super Burly Brawl. A 3-D timeline gives a handy summary of the story so far, and there's a plug for The Matrix Online game. The anamorphic 2.40:1 picture is, of course, a real treat to look at, even if the movie is mostly shades of dark grey and dark green; soundwise the dynamic range of the Dolby Digital surround is extreme: all conversations are conducted in throaty whispers, while the action sequences will push your speakers to the limit. No DTS option, though. And as with Reloaded, there's no audio commentary either: the Wachowski's policy of not talking about their creation begins to seem like a ploy to avoid answering awkward questions. --Mark Walker

  • Paula Rego - Telling Tales [DVD] [UMD Mini for PSP] Paula Rego - Telling Tales | UMD | (10/08/2009) from £9.99  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Born in Portugal Paula Rego is one of Britain's leading artists. This intimate film follows the artist from her retrospective at the Reina Sofia in Madrid back to the privacy of her studio in London while she talks with humour and candour about her compulsion to produce works that though accessible deal with the most private themes.

  • Hollow Man [UMD Universal Media Disc] Hollow Man | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £4.99  |  Saving you £9.51 (52.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Dawn Of The Dead [Director's Cut] [UMD Universal Media Disc] Dawn Of The Dead | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £6.98  |  Saving you £11.01 (61.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Poseidon [UMD Mini for PSP] [2006] Poseidon | UMD | (09/10/2006) from £2.99  |  Saving you £13.50 (71.10%)  |  RRP £18.99

  • The Fifth Element [UMD Universal Media Disc] [1997] The Fifth Element | UMD | (05/12/2005) from £7.29  |  Saving you £8.70 (54.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    In the year 2257 a planet-sized sphere of supreme evil is approaching the earth at relentless speed threatening to exterminate every living organism unless four ancient stones representing the elements of earth wind fire and water are united with the mysterious fifth element.From Luc Besson the acclaimed director of 'Leon' and 'Nikita' comes a film that turns science fiction inside out.

  • Saw II [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] Saw II | UMD | (27/03/2006) from £6.97  |  Saving you £13.01 (65.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • Wolf Creek [UMD Universal Media Disc] Wolf Creek | UMD | (16/01/2006) from £1.99  |  Saving you £2.44 (13.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Rocky V [UMD Mini for PSP] [DVD] Rocky V | UMD | (19/12/2007) from £2.60  |  Saving you £0.60 (10.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • The Informant! [UMD Mini for PSP] The Informant! | UMD | (29/03/2010) from £1.49  |  Saving you £3.01 (30.10%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Steven Soderbergh's The Informant!, like the director's one-two Oscar® punch Erin Brockovich and Traffic, is an energetic exposé of corporate/criminal chicanery with wide-ranging implications for life in these United States. Not so much like those movies, it plays as hyper-caffeinated comedy. At its center is Mark Whitacre (Matt Damon), a biochemist and junior executive at agri-giant Archer Daniels Midland who, in 1992, began feeding the FBI evidence of ADM's involvement in price fixing. Mark's motive for doing so is elusive, sometimes self-contradictory, and subject to mutation at any moment. To describe him as bipolar would be akin to finding the Marx Brothers somewhat zany. His Fed handlers, along with the audience, start thinking of him as a hapless goofball. Then they and we get blind-sided with the revelation of further dimensions of Mark's life at ADM, and the nature of the investigation, and the movie, changes. That will happen again. And again. It's Soderbergh's ingenious strategy to make us fellow travelers on Mark's crazy ride, virtually infecting us with a short-term version of his dysfunctional being. Props to screenwriter Scott Z. Burns for boiling down Kurt Eichenwald's 600-page book The Informant: A True Story without sacrificing coherence. And Matt Damon, bulked up by two stones and spluttering his manic lines from under a caterpillar mustache, reconfirms his virtuosity and his willingness to dive deep into such a dodgy personality. On the downside, despite a small army of comedians in cameo roles, The Informant! has nothing like the rich field of subsidiary characters encountered in Erin Brockovich and Traffic. That lack of vibrancy is aggravated by the dominance of prairie-flat Midwest speech patterns and cadences (most of the film unreels in Illinois), and the razzmatazz score by veteran tunesmith Marvin Hamlisch sounds like pep-rally music on an industrial film. Soderbergh also photographed the movie (under his pseudonym Peter Andrews), and his decision to show everything through a corn-mush filter turns it into a big-screen YouTube experience. --Richard T. Jameson

  • Mrs Doubtfire [UMD Mini for PSP] [1993] Mrs Doubtfire | UMD | (09/03/2009) from £7.09  |  Saving you £-1.10 (-18.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • Kung Fu Hustle [UMD Universal Media Disc] Kung Fu Hustle | UMD | (03/10/2005) from £3.50  |  Saving you £13.05 (65.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Movie-kinetics genius. Kung Fu Hustle takes the gleeful mayhem of Hong Kong action movies, the deadpan physical humor of silent comedies, and the sheer elasticity of Wile E. Coyote cartoons and fuses them into a spectacle that is simple in its joys and mind-boggling in its orchestration. A run-down slum has been poor but peaceful until a bunch of black-suited gangsters called the Axe Gang show up to cause trouble --and discover that, hidden among the humble poor, are three kung fu masters trying to live an ordinary life. But after these martial artists repulse the gang with their flying fists and feet, the gang leader hires a pair of assassins, whose arrival leads to the unveiling of more secrets, until both the screen and the audience are dizzy with hyperbolic fight artistry (choreographed by Yuen Wo Ping, who also choreographed MThe Matrix). Weaving through this escalating fury is a loudmouthed loser (writer/director/actor Stephen Chow) who suddenly finds himself having to live up to his bragging. Kung Fu Hustle more than lives up to the promise of Chow's previous film, Shaolin Soccer -- it's a movie made by an imagination unfettered by the laws of physics. Hugely entertaining. --Bret Fetzer

  • Mad Max [UMD Mini for PSP] [1979] [DVD] Mad Max | UMD | (01/01/2008) from £4.75  |  Saving you £-0.95 (-15.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The story of Mel Gibson's stately anti-hero begins in Mad Max, George Miller's low-budget debut, in which Max is a "Bronze" (cop) in an unspecified post-apocalyptic future with a buddy-partner and family. But, unlike most films set in the devastated future, Mad Max is notable because it is poised between our industrialised world and total regression to medieval conditions. The scale tips towards disintegration when the Glory Riders burn into town on their bikes like an overcharged cadre of Brando's Wild Ones. Representing the active chaos that will eventually overwhelm the dying vestiges of civil society they take everything dear to Max, who then has to exact due revenge. His flight into the same wilds that created the villains artfully sets up the morally ambiguous character of the subsequent films. --Alan E Rapp, Amazon.com

  • Little Britain [UMD Universal Media Disc] Little Britain | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £4.50  |  Saving you £12.70 (63.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • A Knight's Tale [UMD Universal Media Disc] A Knight's Tale | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £6.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (63.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Tiesto In Concert 2004 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Tiesto In Concert 2004 | UMD | (04/09/2006) from £9.59  |  Saving you £3.40 (26.20%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • The Punisher [UMD Universal Media Disc] The Punisher | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £5.05  |  Saving you £12.94 (71.90%)  |  RRP £17.99

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