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  • Midnight Special [Blu-ray] [2016] Midnight Special | Blu Ray | (08/08/2016) from £5.98  |  Saving you £17.01 (74.00%)  |  RRP £22.99

    After rescuing his son, Alton from a fundamentalist religious sect who are convinced his powerful supernatural abilities are the key to their salvation, Roy (Michael Shannon), Alton and their bodyguard (Joel Edgerton) are on the run for their lives. What starts as a desperate escape from a fearsome cult soon attracts the attention of the FBI who believe the boy to be a threat to mankind's very existence. With the trio's fate hanging in the balance, Roy will stop at nothing to keep his son from harm and uncover the truth behind his unbelievable powers, a discovery which could change the world forever.

  • Jupiter Ascending [DVD] [2015] Jupiter Ascending | DVD | (29/06/2015) from £3.99  |  Saving you £15.05 (75.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Channing Tatum and Mila Kunis star in “Jupiter Ascending ” an original science fiction action adventure from filmmakers Lana and Andy Wachowski. Jupiter Jones (Kunis) was born under a night sky with signs predicting that she was destined for great things. Now grown Jupiter dreams of the stars but wakes up to the cold reality of a job cleaning other people’s houses and an endless run of bad breaks. Only when Caine (Tatum) a genetically engineered ex-military hunter arrives on Earth to track her down does Jupiter begin to glimpse the fate that has been waiting for her all along—her genetic signature marks her as next in line for an extraordinary inheritance that could alter the balance of the cosmos. From the streets of Chicago to far flung galaxies whirling through space “Jupiter Ascending” was written and directed by the Wachowskis. The film was produced by two-time Oscar® nominee Grant Hill (“The Tree of Life ” “The Thin Red Line”) together with Lana Wachowski and Andy Wachowski continuing a collaboration the three began with “The Matrix” Trilogy. Roberto Malerba and Bruce Berman served as executive producers. Channing Tatum (“Magic Mike”) and Mila Kunis (“Oz the Great and Powerful”) lead a starring cast that includes Sean Bean (“The Lord of the Rings” Trilogy) Eddie Redmayne (“Les Misérables”) Douglas Booth (“Noah”) and Tuppence Middleton (BBC’s “The Lady Vanishes”). Behind the scenes “Jupiter Ascending” reunited the Wachowskis with many of their longstanding collaborators who most recently worked with them on “Cloud Atlas.” They include Oscar®-winning director of photography John Toll (“Braveheart ” “Legends of the Fall”); production designer Hugh Bateup; editor Alexander Berner; costume designer Kym Barrett; and hair and makeup designer Jeremy Woodhead. The music was composed by Oscar® winner Michael Giacchino (“Up”). “Jupiter Ascending” showcases the kind of cutting-edge visual effects that have become the benchmarks of the Wachowskis’ films. Dan Glass (“Batman Begins ” “Cloud Atlas”) was the visual effects supervisor a post he has occupied for the Wachowskis since “The Matrix” Trilogy. Additionally John Gaeta the visual effects Oscar® winner behind “The Matrix ” contributed to the visual effects design. Warner Bros. Pictures presents in association with Village Roadshow Pictures in association with Anarchos Productions “Jupiter Ascending.” The film will be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company and in select territories by Village Roadshow Pictures. Click Images to Enlarge

  • A Good Day to Die Hard [DVD] A Good Day to Die Hard | DVD | (10/06/2013) from £1.97  |  Saving you £18.02 (90.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Iconoclastic take-no-prisoners cop John McClane for the first time finds himself on foreign soil after traveling to Moscow to help his wayward son Jack. With the Russian underworld in pursuit and battling a countdown to war the two McClanes discover their opposing methods make them unstoppable heroes.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) [2002] The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Two Disc Theatrical Edition) | DVD | (26/08/2003) from £3.10  |  Saving you £11.20 (74.70%)  |  RRP £14.99

    With The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, the focus of Tolkien's epic story moves from the fantastic to the mythic, from magic and monsters towards men and their deeds, as the expanding panorama of Middle-earth introduces us to the Viking-like Riders of Rohan and the men of Gondor. Which is not to say that Peter Jackson's three-hour second instalment doesn't have its fair share of amazing new creatures--here we meet Wargs, Oliphaunts and winged Nazgul, to name three--just that the film is concerned more with myth-making on a heroic scale than the wide-eyed wonder of The Fellowship of the Ring. There's no time for recapitulation, as a host of new characters are introduced in rapid succession. In Rohan we meet the initially moribund King Theoden (Bernard Hill); his treacherous advisor Grima Wormtongue (Brad Dourif); his feisty niece Eowyn (Miranda Otto); and his strong-willed nephew Eomer (Karl Urban). Faramir (David Wenham), brother of Boromir, is the other principal human addition to the cast. The hobbits, though, encounter the two most remarkable new characters, both of whom are digitally generated: in Fangorn Forest, Merry and Pippin are literally carried away by Treebeard, a dignified old Ent; while Frodo and Sam capture the duplicitous Gollum, whose fate is inextricably intertwined with that of the Ring. The film stands or falls with Gollum. If the characterisation had gone the way of Jar Jar Binks, The Two Towers would have been ruined, notwithstanding all the spectacle and grandeur of the rest. But Gollum is a triumph, a tribute both to the computer animators and the motion-captured performance of Andy Serkis: his "dialogues", delivered theatre-like direct to the audience, are a masterstroke. Here and elsewhere Jackson is unafraid to make changes to the story line, bringing Frodo and Sam to Osgiliath, for example, or tipping Aragorn over a cliff. Yet the director's deft touch always seems to add not detract from Tolkien's vision. Just three among many examples: Aragorn's poignant dreams of Arwen (Liv Tyler); Gimli's comic repartee even in the heat of battle; and the wickedly effective siege weapons of the Uruk-Hai (which signify both Saruman's mastery and his perversion of technology). The climactic confrontation at Helm's Deep contains images the like of which have simply never been seen on film before. Almost unimaginably, there's so much more still to come in the Return of the King. On the DVD: The Two Towers two-disc set, like the Fellowship before it, features the theatrical version of the movie on the first disc, in glorious 2.35:1 widescreen, accompanied by Dolby 5.1 or Dolby Stereo sound options. As before, commentaries and the really in-depth features are held back for the extended four-disc version. Such as they are, all the extras are reserved for Disc Two. The 14-minute documentary On the Set is a run-of-the-mill publicity preview for the movie; more substantial is the 43-minute Return to Middle-Earth, another promotional feature, which at least has plenty of input from cast and crew. Much more interesting are the briefer pieces, notably: Sean Astin's charming silent short The Long and the Short of It, plus an amusing making-of featurette; a teaser trailer for the extended DVD release; and a tantalising 12-minute sneak peek at Return of the King, introduced by Peter Jackson, in which he declares nonchalantly that "Helm's Deep was just an opening skirmish"! --Mark Walker

  • Made Of Honour [2008] Made Of Honour | DVD | (29/09/2008) from £2.34  |  Saving you £17.65 (88.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Patrick Dempsey and Michelle Monaghan star in Made Of Honour a delightful romantic comedy. For Tom (Patrick Dempsey) life is good: he's sexy successful has great luck with the ladies and know he can always rely on Hannah (Michelle Monaghan) - his delightful best friend and the one constant in his life! It's the perfect setup until Hannah goes overseas to Scotland on a six-week business trip... And Tom is stunned to realise how empty his life is without her. He resolves to ask her to marry him - but on her return Hannah has some news of her own: She is getting married to a handsome and wealthy Scotsman. When Hannah asks Tom to be her 'maid' of honor he reluctantly agrees to fill the role... But only so he can attempt to woo Hannah and stop the wedding before it's too late!

  • Green Lantern [DVD] [2011] Green Lantern | DVD | (17/10/2011) from £3.19  |  Saving you £16.80 (84.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In brightest day, in blackest night, no evil shall escape my sight! Let those who worship evil's might beware my power... Green Lantern's light!In a universe as vast as it is mysterious, a small but powerful force has existed for centuries. Protectors of peace and justice, they are called the Green Lantern Corps. A brotherhood of warriors sworn to keep intergalactic order, each Green Lantern wears a ring that grants him superpowers. But when a new enemy called Parallax threatens to destroy the balance of power in the Universe, their fate and the fate of Earth lie in the hands of their newest recruit, the first human ever selected: Hal Jordan.Hal is a gifted and cocky test pilot, but the Green Lanterns have little respect for humans, who have never harnessed the infinite powers of the ring before. But Hal is clearly the missing piece to the puzzle, and along with his determination and willpower, he has one thing no member of the Corps has ever had: humanity. With the encouragement of fellow pilot and childhood sweetheart Carol Ferris (Blake Lively), if Hal can quickly master his new powers and find the courage to overcome his fears, he may prove to be not only the key to defeating Parallax...he will become the greatest Green Lantern of all.

  • Moulin Rouge -- Two-Disc Set [2001] Moulin Rouge -- Two-Disc Set | DVD | (03/05/2004) from £3.99  |  Saving you £18.26 (79.40%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Watching Baz Luhrmann's award-winning Moulin Rouge is a lot like falling in love. It is total immersion cinema and while you're experiencing it ("watching" is too passive a word) you can't imagine that cinema could be for anything else. In the harsh, objective post-viewing daylight Lurhmann's gaudy spectacular might seem like a triumph of glossy style over any genuine substance, but as the film unfolds Lurhmann subjects his audience to a such a barrage of overtly stylised music, dance, colour, design and human passion that the senses are overwhelmed and critical faculties put on hold for the duration. The story is paper-thin, but that's hardly the point. Nicole Kidman's courtesan Satine falls for poor poet Ewan McGregor while pledged to a psychotic English Duke. The show goes on, of course, and we know it will end in tragedy--because that's the sort of story this is, and the only thing that makes it bearable is the knowledge that it's all just brilliant artifice. The third of Luhrman's "Red Curtain" trilogy (after Strictly Ballroom and Romeo + Juliet), Moulin Rouge reinvents musical cinema, acknowledging its debt to past masters like Vincente Minnelli (Gigi) and Michael Powell (The Red Shoes), but taking in the best of rock video along the way. The incessant MTV-style editing might seem like a distraction, but in the end a film insane enough to include Jim Broadbent's cover of "Like a Virgin" defines its own genre rules. On the DVD: this double-disc package sets new standards of presentation while also having an ideally appropriate light-heartedness. The extra features are as inventive in their use of the format as the film itself. Highlights include not one but two commentaries--one by Luhrmann, his designer and his cinematographer, the other with Lurhmann and his fellow scriptwriter Craig Pearce. We get two videos of "Lady Marmalade" and there are also uncut dance numbers, for example the fabulously dark Tango sequence in all its detail, which come with alternate camera angles so that you can edit your own version. There are whole segments on the glittery costumes, the three-dimensional model of Paris and the transformation of Kylie Minogue into the Green Fairy of absinthe. The film is presented in anamorphic widescreen (formatted for 16:9 TVs) with a visual aspect ratio of 1.85:1 and has lush, velvety Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS 5.1 sound options. --Roz Kaveney

  • Ben Hur (DVD + Digital Download) Ben Hur (DVD + Digital Download) | DVD | (16/01/2017) from £3.00  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    The epic story of Judah Ben-Hur, a prince falsely accused of treason by his adopted brother, an officer in the Roman army. After years at sea, Judah returns to his homeland to seek revenge, but finds redemption. Click Images to Enlarge

  • The Man Who Knew Infinity [DVD] [2016] The Man Who Knew Infinity | DVD | (15/08/2016) from £5.89  |  Saving you £14.10 (70.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Colonial India, 1913. Srinivasa Ramanujan (Dev Patel) is a 25-year-old shipping clerk and self-taught genius, who failed out of college due to his near-obsessive, solitary study of mathematics. Determined to pursue his passion despite rejection and derision from his peers, Ramanujan writes a letter to G. H. Hardy (Jeremy Irons), an eminent British mathematics professor at Trinity College, Cambridge. Hardy recognizes the originality and brilliance of Ramanujan's raw talent and despite the scepticism of his colleagues, undertakes bringing him to Cambridge so that his theories can be explored. Ramanujan leaves his family, his community, and his beloved young bride, Janaki (Devika Bhisé), to travel across the world to England. There, he finds understanding and a deep connection with his sophisticated and eccentric mentor. Under Hardy's guidance, Ramanujan's work evolves in ways that will revolutionize mathematics and transform how scientists explain the world. Hardy fights tirelessly to get Ramanujan the recognition and respect that he deserves but in reality he is as much an outcast in the traditional culture of Cambridge as he was among his peers in India. But Ramanujan fights illness and intense homesickness to formally prove his theorems so that his work will finally be seen and believed by a mathematical establishment that is not prepared for his unconventional methods. The Man Who Knew Infinity is the improbable true story of a unique genius whose pivotal theories propelled him from obscurity into a world in the midst of war, and how he fought tirelessly to show the world the genius of his mind. Click Images to Enlarge

  • The Iron Lady [DVD] The Iron Lady | DVD | (30/04/2012) from £4.19  |  Saving you £15.80 (79.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Phyllida Lloyd, who directed Meryl Streep in Mamma Mia!, takes a less exuberant tack in this unexpectedly poignant biopic. In the script, written by Shame's Abi Morgan, Lloyd depicts the elderly Dame Thatcher (Streep in a thoroughly convincing performance) as a frail figure replaying key moments in her life while her mind still continues to function. Her trajectory begins with grocer Alfred Roberts (Downton Abbey's Iain Glen), who became the mayor of Grantham, instilling in his daughter, Margaret (Alexandra Roach), a passion for politics. After graduating from Oxford, she felt ready to enter the fray, at which point she met Denis Thatcher (Harry Lloyd), who cheered her along on the road from Parliament to 10 Downing Street, where they lived during her time as Britain's first female prime minister (Jim Broadbent portrays the grey-haired and ghostly Denis). While closing mines, dodging IRA hits, and overseeing a war, the blue-clad titan built alliances with Airey Neave (Nicholas Farrell) and Geoffrey Howe (Anthony Head), but she would lose them both. If her will was strong, she had no time for feminine niceties like conciliation and forgiveness. The film goes on to suggest that she never cultivated the kinds of female friendships that might have sustained her in retirement, though her daughter (Tyrannosaur's Olivia Colman) did what she could. Instead, Denis remained her closest confidante until his departure, after which she had nothing but fading memories. The upshot is an uneasy combination of admiration for her leadership qualities and disappointment in her interpersonal skills. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) [2002] The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition) | DVD | (18/11/2003) from £8.99  |  Saving you £11.00 (55.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    With significant extra footage and a multitude of worthwhile bonus features this extended version of The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is as colossal an achievement as its predecessor, The Fellowship of the Ring. There are valuable additions to the story, including two new scenes which might appease those who feel that the characterisation of Faramir was the film's most egregious departure from the book; fans will also appreciate an appearance of the Huorns at Helm's Deep plus a nod to the absence of Tom Bombadil. Seeing a little more interplay between the gorgeous Eowyn and Aragorn is welcome, as is a grim introduction to Eomer and Theoden's son. And among the many other additions, there's an extended epilogue that might not have worked in cinemas, but is more effective here in setting up The Return of the King. While the 30 minutes added to The Fellowship of the Ring felt just right in enriching the film, the extra footage in The Two Towers at times seems a bit extraneous--we see moments that in the theatrical version we had been told about, and some fleshed-out conversations and incidents are rather minor. But director Peter Jackson's vision of JRR Tolkien's world is so marvellous that it's hard to complain about any extra time we can spend there. While it may seem that there would be nothing left to say after the bevy of features on the extended Fellowship, the four commentary tracks and two discs of supplements on The Two Towers remain informative, fascinating, and funny, far surpassing the recycled materials on the two-disc theatrical version. Highlights of the 6.5 hours' worth of documentaries offer insight on the stunts, the design work, the locations and the creation of Gollum and--most intriguing for avid fans--the film's writers (including Jackson) discuss why they created events that weren't in the book. Providing variety are animatics, rough footage, countless sketches and a sound-mixing demonstration. Again, the most interesting commentary tracks are by Jackson and writers Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens and by 16 members of the cast (eight of whom didn't appear in the first film, and even including John Noble, whose Denethor character only appears in this extended cut). The first two instalments of Peter Jackson's trilogy have established themselves as the best fantasy films of all time, and among the best film trilogies of all time, and their extended-edition DVD sets have set a new standard for expanding on the already epic films and providing comprehensive bonus features. --David Horiuchi

  • Keeping Up With The Joneses [DVD] Keeping Up With The Joneses | DVD | (13/02/2017) from £6.80  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    An ordinary suburban couple (Zach Galifianakis, Isla Fisher) finds it's not easy keeping up with the Joneses (Jon Hamm, Gal Gadot) -- their impossibly gorgeous and ultra-sophisticated new neighbours - especially when they discover that Mr. and Mrs. Jones are covert operatives.

  • The Guardian [2006] The Guardian | DVD | (19/02/2007) from £4.29  |  Saving you £13.70 (76.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    When lives are on the line sacrifice everything. In an effort to find his place in life a troubled young man enlists in the Coast Guard where he's taken in by a renowned rescue swimmer who's hardened by the loss of his team from an accident years back. Unfortunately for the pair the past is about to re-incarnate itself...

  • G.I. Joe: Retaliation [DVD] G.I. Joe: Retaliation | DVD | (22/07/2013) from £3.27  |  Saving you £16.72 (83.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    For everyone who rolled their eyes even as they were secretly digging 2009's G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra as a guilty pleasure (not to mention giving it big box-office clout), this rejiggered sequel will probably prove irresistible. Hasbro and Hollywood have successfully created a franchise based on toy action figures that were introduced almost 50 years ago, now featuring all the guns, glory, and apocalyptic politics of the modern age. Along with that come the heights of preposterous circumstances and childish fantasy that any $200-plus million action movie requires. The video game quality and action figure/comic book childishness notwithstanding, G.I. Joe: Retaliation is anything but childlike with its incalculable body count, physical carnage, and extreme fetishisation of violence and techno armaments. Feeling cocky from their vanquishing the evil Cobra organisation in the first movie, the Joes are all the more ready to save the world from itself, making clandestine forays into North Korea and Pakistan with deadly precision. (The dizzying assault on a Pakistani weapons base is genuinely spectacular.) What they don't know is that Cobra has been lying in wait, and that the free world's Commander in Chief (Jonathan Pryce, having a fine time) is being impersonated by the nefarious Cobra operative Zartan (Arnold Vosloo). In the guise of a benevolent leader seeking world nuclear disarmament, "President" Zartan discredits and wipes out all but three of the Joe force. Fortunately Dwayne Johnson is among them, and every moviegoer knows he's pretty much an army of one. The script is so whiz-bang fast and full of impossibly extravagant CGI-enhanced eye-poppery that any synopsis would be akin to, well, 10-year-olds smashing three-inch action figures into each other and making up a narrative to go along with their guttural sound effects. And isn't that a pretty good description of escapism? Mention must be made of an incredible sustained set piece staged on sheer Himalayan cliffs where sword-wielding ninjas soar on ropes in an elaborate choreography that is as inventive as it is thrilling. The finale explodes at historic Fort Sumter, of all places, where the faceless Cobra Commander showdowns with the revivified Joes during "The President's" bogus disarmament summit. The cast is adequate in portraying good or bad real-life action figures with funny names and unbreakable bodies. Bruce Willis seems very happy chomping in to a glorified cameo as the retired Joe commander. Though the Joes carry the day and glory can be claimed, it should be noted that a sequel is teed up perfectly, especially in light of the fact that Cobra pretty much succeeds in its world-domination plan by obliterating the whole of London and its eight million inhabitants. It is the most extreme of money shots, rendered with loving detail; but don't worry, kids, it's only a movie. --Ted Fry

  • St Trinian's [2007] St Trinian's | DVD | (14/04/2008) from £2.99  |  Saving you £17.00 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring Stephen Fry Colin Firth Rupert Everett Mischa Barton Russell Brand and Gemma Arterton St. Trinian's is the sicth in a series of films based on the works of cartoonist Ronald Searle. St Trinian's a school for ""young ladies"" with its anarchic doctrine of free expression brings together a motley crew of ungovernable girls who using their wit and ingenuity save the school from bankruptcy.

  • Godzilla [DVD] [2014] Godzilla | DVD | (27/10/2014) from £2.80  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    An epic rebirth to Toho's iconic Godzilla this spectacular adventure from Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures pits the world's most famous monster against malevolent creatures who bolstered by humanity's scientific arrogance threaten our very existence. Gareth Edwards directs Godzilla which stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Kick-Ass) Oscar® nominee Ken Watanabe (The Last Samurai Inception) Elizabeth Olsen (Martha Marcy May Marlene) Oscar® winner Juliette Binoche (The English Patient Cosmopolis) and Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine) with Oscar® nominee David Strathairn (Good Night and Good Luck. The Bourne Legacy) and Bryan Cranston (Argo TV's Breaking Bad).

  • Red [DVD] Red | DVD | (14/02/2011) from £2.85  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Frank (Bruce Willis) Joe (Morgan Freeman) Marvin (John Malkovich) and Victoria (Helen Mirren) used to be the CIA's top agents - but the secrets they know just made them the Agency's top targets. Now framed for assassination they must use all of their collective cunning experience and teamwork to stay one step ahead of their deadly pursuers and stay alive. To stop the operation the team embarks on an impossible cross-country mission to break into the top-secret CIA headquarters where they will uncover one of the biggest conspiracies and cover-ups in government history.

  • Anonymous [DVD] Anonymous | DVD | (05/03/2012) from £2.79  |  Saving you £15.20 (84.50%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Historical romp Anonymous takes an academic controversy (did the man named Shakespeare write the plays attributed to him?) and whips it into a lurid melodrama, crammed with political intrigue, heaving bosoms, flashing swordplay, conspiracies, forced marriage, incest, and more. Towards the end of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford (Rhys Ifans, Enduring Love), seeks an outlet for his poetic drive: he tries to get the playwright Ben Jonson (Sebastian Armesto) to present his plays as Jonson's own. Jonson is reluctant to undercut his own work? but his friend, a vainglorious illiterate actor by the name of William Shakespeare (Rafe Spall), happily claims the glory when Oxford's plays prove hugely popular. But the real story of Anonymous isn't about authorship, it's about machinations to capture the throne of England when Elizabeth (Vanessa Redgrave) dies. Wily counselors vie with dashing secret heirs, royal dallying leads to shocking secrets, and supposedly the plays are inextricably caught up in it all--except that they're not, really, and so Anonymous, for all its clever plotting and lush production values, falls flat by the end. Still, it's an enjoyable confection up to then, and showcases some lovely (if woefully historically inaccurate--the mosh-pit moment is delightfully preposterous) presentations of bits of the plays. Also featuring David Thewlis (Naked) and Joely Richardson, daughter of Ms. Redgrave, playing the younger Elizabeth. --Bret Fetzer

  • Avatar (2 Disc) [Blu-ray] Avatar (2 Disc) | Blu Ray | (26/04/2010) from £4.62  |  Saving you £25.37 (84.60%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Avatar is set in the year 2154. The world is dying. Its energy resources are almost spent and its inhabitant have travelled to a distant planet called Pandora where they hope to extract a valuable mineral called Unobtanium.

  • Hunt For The Wilderpeople [Blu-ray] Hunt For The Wilderpeople | Blu Ray | (16/01/2017) from £5.13  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    Raised on hip-hop and foster care, defiant city kid Ricky gets a fresh start in the New Zealand countryside. He quickly finds himself at home with his new foster family: the loving Aunt Bella, the grumpy Uncle Hec, and dog Tupac. When a tragedy strikes that threatens to ship Ricky to another home, both he and Hec go on the run in the bush. As a national manhunt ensues, the newly branded outlaws must assess their options: go out in a blaze of glory or overcome their differences and survive as a family. A hilarious, touching crowd-pleaser directed by Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows,Thor: Ragnarok) and starring Sam Neill, Julian Dennison and Rhys Darby (TV s Flight of the Conchords) . © Majestical Pictures Limited 2016. All Rights Reserved. Extras: Bloopers, Featurette, Director's Commentary, Making Of Contains Hard of Hearing subtitles and audio description.

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