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  • Premonition [2007] Premonition | DVD | (16/07/2007) from £3.09  |  Saving you £16.90 (84.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    They said it was an accident... But the reality is... It hasn't happened yet... Linda Hanson (Sandra Bullock) has a beautiful house a loving husband and two adorable daughters. Her life is perfect until the day she receives the devastating news that her husband (Julian McMahon) has died in a car accident. When she wakes up the next morning to find him alive and well she assumes it was all a dream. She soon realises that this is not the case and her world is turned upside down as the surreal circumstances lead her to discover that her perfect life may not have been all that it appeared. Desperate to save her family Linda begins a furious race against time and fate to try and preserve everything that she and Jim have built together.

  • Surrogates [DVD] [2009] Surrogates | DVD | (01/02/2010) from £3.89  |  Saving you £12.10 (75.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Intriguingly scaled more along the lines of a good sci-fi short story than a steroid-enhanced action picture, Surrogates proposes a variation on spectatorship-run-amok. In the near future, human beings need no longer leave their homes: mechanical surrogates, similar in appearance (but younger looking, fitter, with fewer wrinkles and more hair) can move about in the world on the user's behalf, following commands and absorbing physical wear and tear. A cop (Bruce Willis) begins investigating a mystifying case of a user who died when his surrogate got blasted by a fancy ray-gun in the street--that's a definite violation of the company guarantee. In the course of a trim, sub-90-minute running time, the Willis character himself is forced to enter the mean streets in his own flesh-and-blood version, not his surrogate, a move that puzzles both his wife (Rosamund Pike) and partner (Radha Mitchell). In the movie's scheme of perfect surrogates and digitally-smoothed faces, the grizzled humanity of Bruce Willis comes blazing through; what a relief to see a battered human in the midst of the beautiful people. Director Jonathan Mostow (Terminator 3) gets the world right, but one waits in vain for a fuller picture of the effects of this surrogate population, or a deeper study of the creator (James Cromwell) of the technology, or a reason to get involved in the rebel leader (Ving Rhames in a fright wig) and his reservation populated by defiant non-surrogates. Sprinting along as it does, Surrogates doesn't find time for these presumably crucial details, and the result feels a little skin-deep. --Robert Horton

  • The Family Man [2000] The Family Man | DVD | (02/07/2001) from £4.18  |  Saving you £15.81 (79.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Jack Campbell (Nicolas Cage) is a quintessential Wall Street shark, scoring killer deals by day and shallow escort sex by night in The Family Man. Carp all you want about this derivative premise, with its marginal stereotypes and biased embrace of domestic bliss and dirty nappies. The simple fact is, The Family Man works like a charm. Under the assured direction of Brett Ratner (Rush Hour), this holiday crowd-pleaser offers comedy and chemistry in equal measure, making the hilarity of Jack's predicament a smooth catalyst for that rarest of film romances: the marital love story. Leoni is Cage's perfect match as Jack's idealised but imperfect wife and the films's appeal largely derives from its awareness that any life has its pleasures and pains. While it only flirts with the dark desperation that makes It's a Wonderful Life a classic predecessor, The Family Man is an irresistible what-if fantasy and even its debatable ending rides on a wave of genuine warmth and sentiment. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Bride And Prejudice [2004] Bride And Prejudice | DVD | (30/03/2005) from £5.39  |  Saving you £10.60 (66.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Bollywood meets Hollywood... And it's a perfect match! From the team behind international smash hit Bend It Like Beckham comes a Jane Austen adaptation like never before. Pride & Prejudice gets the Bollywood treatment and the result is a spectacular fusion of East meets West. Austen's classic love story unfolds in a riot of colour and emotion song and dance that jet-sets from rural India via London to Los Angeles.A must see for lovers of musicals Bollywood and ultimately f

  • Catfish [DVD] Catfish | DVD | (10/01/2011) from £4.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (73.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    In late 2007 filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost sensed a story unfolding as they began to film the life of Ariel's brother Nev. They had no idea that their project would lead to the most exhilarating and unsettling months of their lives. A reality thriller that is a shocking product of our times Catfish is a riveting story of love deception and grace within a labyrinth of online intrigue.

  • Grown Ups 2 [DVD] [2013] Grown Ups 2 | DVD | (02/12/2013) from £3.85  |  Saving you £14.14 (78.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns with some exciting new additions! After moving his family back to his hometown to be with his friends and their kids Lenny (Adam Sandler) finds out that between old bullies new bullies schizo bus drivers drunk cops on skis and 400 costumed party crashers sometimes crazy follows you.

  • The Dish [2001] The Dish | DVD | (12/11/2001) from £9.26  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £13.99

    When released in 2000, The Dish achieved the highest opening gross in its native Australia, a testament to the country's pride in its home-grown movies. Concentrating on that legendary day in July 1969 when Neil Armstrong set foot on the Moon The Dish looks at the small but crucial role of the Parkes satellite receiver, without which the world would never have seen the historic landing. Sam Neill is the pipe-smoking "Dish Master" Cliff, whose team includes Dish mover "Mitch", distractedly love-struck electronics nerd Glenn and NASA representative Al. The Dish could have played the plot premise as a documentary or with a dramatic edge, but chooses instead to present the story at a leisurely comedic pace which oozes charm. The excited little community offers a snapshot of a fondly remembered past full of the idealism of the 1960s. Populated by warm-hearted souls, it's easy to forgive the town band welcoming a US Ambassador with the "Hawaii 5-0" theme instead of the National Anthem. The Dish may not have the sense of danger of Apollo 13, or the dazzling FX of something like Armageddon, but it does have rounded, enjoyable characterisation and a truthful, warming atmosphere, making it easily one of the most enjoyable films inspired by the "space race". --Paul Tonks

  • Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon [Blu-ray] [2000] Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon | Blu Ray | (06/07/2009) from £7.29  |  Saving you £2.70 (27.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Amazing martial arts fighting sequences (choreographed by Yuen wo Ping - The Matrix) stunning special effects action adventure and romance have made Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon the most talked about movie of the year. Martial arts masters Li Mu Bai (Chow Yun-Fat) and Shu Lien (Michelle Yeoh) battle against evil forces to recover their stolen sword the legendary Green Destiny. Winner of two Golden Globes four BAFTAs and four Academy Awards.

  • Secondhand Lions [2003] Secondhand Lions | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £4.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A coming-of-age story about a shy young boy sent by his irresponsible mother to spend the summer with his wealthy eccentric uncles in Texas. Neighbours think the crazy old men have a secret fortune stashed away... But what's the real truth and where's the cash?

  • Rise of the Planet of the Apes [DVD] Rise of the Planet of the Apes | DVD | (27/02/2012) from £4.00  |  Saving you £15.20 (76.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A galaxy's worth of nihilism buried under a 70s Velveeta topping, The Planet of the Apes series stands today as a dark marvel of pop cinema, a group of wildly variable films that combine to form a giant inescapable kiss-off to the human race. (That said message was able to withstand such distractions as ever-cheapening makeup and Charlton Heston loudly pounding sand makes its achievements even more impressive, really.) Boasting a keen awareness of its predecessors' particular charms and a gem of a central CGI performance by Andy Serkis, Rise of the Planet of the Apes makes for a rather miraculous summer movie: a big-budget special effects extravaganza that also delivers a killer backhand. Sort of redoing 1972's Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, the film follows the events set in motion when a bereaved scientist (James Franco) attempts to create a cure for Alzheimer's, resulting in a supernaturally intelligent chimp named Caesar. The old bit about science tampering in God's domain quickly applies. Director Rupert Wyatt (The Escapist) displays an admirable sense of pacing, deftly levying the escalating action scenes with small character moments from the likes of John Lithgow and Brian Cox. That said, the film belongs to Caesar, whose path from wide-eyed innocent to reluctant revolutionary generates the ironic pulp empathy that gave the original series such a kick. Watching the climactic confrontation on the Golden Gate Bridge, it's distressingly easy to figure out which side to root for. Chuck Heston would no doubt grit his teeth in approval. Note: Those skeptical that this revamp could wholly retain the original's doomy backbeat would do well to stick around during the end credits. --Andrew Wright

  • Red 2 [DVD] Red 2 | DVD | (25/11/2013) from £3.59  |  Saving you £16.40 (82.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Retired CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) reunites his team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a nuclear device. However to succeed they need to survive an army of relentless assassins ruthless terrorists and power crazed government officials all eager to get their hands on the next-generation weapons. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris London and Moscow. Outgunned and outmanned they have only their cunning wits their old-school skills and each other to rely on as they try to save the world.

  • Marie Antoinette Marie Antoinette | DVD | (26/02/2007) from £2.83  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A decadently imaginative interpretation of the life of France's iconic teenage queen Marie Antoinette from her betrothal and marriage to Louis XVI aged 15 to her reign as queen at 19 and to the termination of her royal tenure and ultimately the fall of Versailles in the French Revolution...

  • Divine Secrets Of The Ya-Ya Sisterhood [2002] Divine Secrets Of The Ya-Ya Sisterhood | DVD | (24/03/2003) from £6.49  |  Saving you £7.50 (53.60%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Grab your tissues and send the guys away, because Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood is the most pedigreed chick-flick since Steel Magnolias. You can tell by the title and the novelish names of the Louisiana ladies from Rebecca Wells' precious bestseller. First there's Sidda (Sandra Bullock), a successful playwright still wrestling with her manipulative mother, Vivi (Ellen Burstyn), after a traumatic upbringing. Then there's long-time friends Teensy (Fionnula Flanagan), Necie (Shirley Knight), and Caro (scene-stealer Maggie Smith), from Vivi's secret club of "Ya-Ya Priestesses", together since childhood and determined to heal the rift between Sidda and her mum. Through an ambitious flashback structure (including Ashley Judd as the younger Vivi), screenwriter and first-time director Callie Khouri (who wrote Thelma & Louise) establishes a rich context for this mother-daughter reunion. There's plenty of humour to temper the drama, which inspires Bullock's best work in years. Definitely worth a look for the curious, but only fans of Wells' fiction will feel any twinge of loyalty. --Jeff Shannon

  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2 Disc) [2008] Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2 Disc) | DVD | (10/11/2008) from £4.08  |  Saving you £20.91 (83.70%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Nearly 20 years after riding his last Crusade, Harrison Ford makes a welcome return as archaeologist/relic hunter Indiana Jones in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, an action-packed fourth installment that's, in a nutshell, less memorable than the first three but great nostalgia for fans of the series. Producer George Lucas and screenwriter David Koepp (War of the Worlds) set the film during the cold war, as the Soviets--replacing Nazis as Indy's villains of choice and led by a sword-wielding Cate Blanchett with black bob and sunglasses--are in pursuit of a crystal skull, which has mystical powers related to a city of gold. After escaping from them in a spectacular opening action sequence, Indy is coerced to head to Peru at the behest of a young greaser (Shia LaBeouf) whose friend--and Indy's colleague--Professor Oxley (John Hurt) has been captured for his knowledge of the skull's whereabouts. Whatever secrets the skull holds are tertiary; its reveal is the weakest part of the movie, as the CGI effects that inevitably accompany it feel jarring next to the boulder-rolling world of Indy audiences knew and loved. There's plenty of comedy, delightful stunts--ants play a deadly role here--and the return of Raiders love interest Karen Allen as Marion Ravenwood, once shrill but now softened, giving her ex-love bemused glances and eye-rolls as he huffs his way to save the day. Which brings us to Ford: bullwhip still in hand, he's a little creakier, a lot grayer, but still twice the action hero of anyone in film today. With all the anticipation and hype leading up to the film's release, perhaps no reunion is sweeter than that of Ford with the role that fits him as snugly as that fedora hat. --Ellen A. Kim

  • Eight Legged Freaks [2002] Eight Legged Freaks | DVD | (17/02/2003) from £3.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (71.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    Not funny enough to be called a spoof, not scary enough to be outright horror, Eight Legged Freaks is a curious effects-filled pastiche of those mutant B-movies of the 1950s and 60s. The plot is of the standard small-town-overrun-by-giant-spiders variety, after the little critters have been exposed to leaking radiation naturally. Local boy made good David Arquette has returned to the town to make amends with the woman he loves (feisty Sheriff Kari Wuhrer) and to stop the dastardly mayor from selling his fathers mine. But before he can sort that out, there is a lot of bug squashing to be done as the CGI spiders cause all manner of havoc and mayhem. Eight Legged Freaks is admittedly a lot of fun, and there are some great set-pieces to enjoy, including a gang of teenage dirt bikers escaping a horde of jumping spiders. Its also quite gory in places, though with only a couple of decent shocks its hardly likely to induce large-scale arachnophobia. The spiders are impressive but the CGI is painfully obvious and it never feels real. However, if you can suspend your disbelief for an hour and a half you will enjoy this pacey, fun and action-filled popcorn flick. It doesnt ever take itself too seriously and is certainly a lot more fun than producer Dean Devlins other genre entries, Godzilla and Independence Day. On the DVD: Eight Legged Freaks offers some nice, B-movie poster-style menu screens but little in the way of extras. Theres no making-of, no special effects breakdowns (astonishing given how heavily reliant it is on these to tell the story) and not even any spider-related factoids which seem almost a necessity. What we do get, though, is a fun and sprightly commentary, the theatrical trailer and directors Ellory Elkayem original short film Larger than Life, that formed the basis for its feature-length offspring. Compact, creepy and almost silent, its a shudder-inducing little movie and far more creepy than the main feature. Technically, the picture is sharp and the bright, comic book colours and cinematography look gorgeous, and the squelching soundtrack is wonderfully crisp. --Jon Weir

  • The Village [2004] The Village | DVD | (31/01/2005) from £4.39  |  Saving you £13.60 (75.60%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Even when his trademark twist-ending formula wears worrisomely thin as it does in The Village, M. Night Shyamalan is a true showman who knows how to serve up a spookfest. He's derailed this time by a howler of a "surprise" lifted almost directly from "A Hundred Yards Over the Rim," an episode of The Twilight Zone starring Cliff Robertson that originally aired in 1961. Even if you're unfamiliar with that Rod Serling scenario, you'll have a good chance of guessing the surprise, which ranks well below The Sixth Sense and Signs on Shyamalan's shock-o-meter. That leaves you to appreciate Shyamalan's proven strengths, including a sharp eye for fear-laden compositions, a general sense of unease, delicate handling of fine actors (alas, most of them wasted here, save for Bryce Dallas Howard in a promising debut), and the cautious concealment of his ruse, which in this case involves a 19th-century village that maintains an anxious truce with dreadful creatures that live in the forbidden woods nearby. Will any of this take anyone by genuine surprise? That seems unlikely, since Emperor Shyamalan has clearly lost his clothes in The Village, but it's nice to have him around to scare us, even if he doesn't always succeed. --Jeff Shannon

  • And When Did You Last See Your Father? [2007] And When Did You Last See Your Father? | DVD | (04/02/2008) from £4.39  |  Saving you £11.60 (72.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    And When Did You Last See Your Father? is Blake Morrison's moving and candid memoir of his father in the weeks leading up to his death. When Arthur Morrison was diagnosed with terminal cancer he had only a few weeks left to live. Blake Morrison traveled to Yorkshire to stay with his mother in the village where he grew up. He visites his father at the hospital where he had spent so much time with his own patients as a GP. As his father's condition worsened Morrison contemplates their shared experiences the intimacies and the irritations of their relationship. After his father's death Morrison questions the nature of the bond between them articulately expressing the contradictions frustrations love and loss bound into the complicated relationships which most of us have with our parents as we grow up.

  • Shall We Dance? [2004] Shall We Dance? | DVD | (20/06/2005) from £6.05  |  Saving you £11.94 (66.40%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Something got lost in translation from 1996's critically acclaimed Japanese comedy, but the American remake of Shall We Dance? is not without charms of its own. In being transplanted from Tokyo to Chicago, the original version's subtle humor is shaken out of its cultural context, but this is an otherwise faithful adaptation in which a weary lawyer (Richard Gere) battles his mid-life crisis with ballroom dancing lessons, while his wife (Susan Sarandon) hires a private detective to see if he's cheating. Those expecting a Jennifer Lopez showcase will be disappointed; her role as the melancholy dance instructor keeps the beautifully lovelorn J-Lo on the sidelines, while a cast of standard-issue supporting characters (especially Stanley Tucci's clandestine faux-Latin dance lover) provide a generous dose of Hollywood-ized comic relief. All of this gives Shall We Dance? a polished sheen of mainstream entertainment that many viewers---and especially ballroom dancers--will find delightfully irresistible. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Entrapment [1999] Entrapment | DVD | (04/10/2004) from £2.48  |  Saving you £6.99 (53.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Sean Connery plays a master thief thought to be long retired, while Catherine Zeta-Jones is his foil, a hotshot insurance investigator assigned to his case. They both have a little something to hold over each other's heads, until it turns out that Zeta-Jones is a professional art thief herself and is playing on both sides of the fence. At first they eye each other with mutual distrust until they team up for a job, which goes off without a hitch. Inevitably their prickly relationship begins to thaw somewhat, and the two become attracted to each other as they plan out the massive Y2K bank scam that is the movie's climax (complete with sequel-ready ending). Entrapment plays somewhat like a 1970s caper movie revamped for the gadget-happy high-tech '90s. The plot takes a few too many laboured twists and turns, and the chemistry between the two leads is nearly non-existent, though both carry on gamely in their parts. On the other hand, there is some genuine suspense in many scenes as they go about their business, dripping with whiz-bang burglary devices. Zeta-Jones, of course, is drop-dead gorgeous, and Connery is as reliable as always in his role. The fairly flat editing and direction tends to drag the film down somewhat, but fans of caper movies, high-tech thrillers and the two leads should find plenty to like in this film. --Jerry Renshaw, Amazon.com

  • New In Town [DVD] [2009] New In Town | DVD | (29/06/2009) from £3.79  |  Saving you £16.20 (81.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Renee Zellweger plays Lucy Hill a high-powered professional who ends up as the proverbial fish out of water when she is sent from her luxurious Miami lifestyle to folksy Minnesota on work. The locals don't quite meet her with open arms and the weather is just as welcoming but she eventually finds herself fitting in. When work commitments mean she has to do something which will damage the community she has to reassess what she wants and find a way to save the town.

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