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  • Zatoichi [2004] Zatoichi | DVD | (26/07/2004) from £4.65  |  Saving you £14.31 (71.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Takeshi "Beat" Kitano, the Japanese actor-director best known in the US for his quirky, ulraviolent gangster movies (Fireworks, Brother, Sonatine) and in the UK (among satellite and cable viewers, at least) for the bizarre It's a Knockout-meets-Endurance gameshow Takeshi's Castle, applies his off-kilter sensibility to the samurai genre in The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi. A blind masseur (Kitano with his hair dyed white) wanders into a small town divided up by rival gangs. Though hunched and shuffling, Zatoichi soon reveals his deadly skills as a swordsman. He befriends a pair of geisha girls with secrets of their own and helps them hunt down the bandits who killed their parents. But one of the gangs has just hired a ronin, a masterless samurai, whose fighting skill may equal the blind swordsman's. Zatoichi mixes a melodramatic storyline, deadpan comedy, and dazzling, CGI-enhanced swordfights into a supremely entertaining package. In Japan, Zatoichi is a recurring character in popular action movies, but Kitano places his own unique stamp on the series. --Bret Fetzer

  • The Counsellor [DVD] The Counsellor | DVD | (17/03/2014) from £3.49  |  Saving you £16.10 (80.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Legendary filmmaker Ridley Scott and Pulitzer Prize winning author Cormac McCarthy (No Country for Old Men) have joined forces in The Counsellor starring Michael Fassbender Penélope Cruz Cameron Diaz Javier Bardem and Brad Pitt. McCarthy - making his screenwriting debut - and Scott interweave the author's characteristic wit and dark humour with a nightmarish scenario in which a respected lawyer's one-time dalliance with an illegal business deal spirals out of control.

  • In The Cut [2003] In The Cut | DVD | (01/03/2004) from £4.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Based on Susanna Moore's novel, In the Cut centres on Frannie (Meg Ryan), an emotionally stifled English teacher who gets steamy with sultry Malloy (Mark Ruffalo), a cop who's investigating a series of brutal murders--but Frannie soon suspects that Malloy may be the killer. As a psychological thriller, In the Cut is heavier on psychology than thrills; the story is a skeleton that director Jane Campion cloaks in one of the most nightmarish visions of urban life since Taxi Driver or Seven, accompanied by lots of explicit sex. The movie's dark tone will put some viewers off, but Ruffalo's effortless magnetism serves him well; no woman in the audience will question how quickly Ryan falls into bed with him. It also features Jennifer Jason Leigh and Kevin Bacon (uncredited). --Bret Fetzer

  • Bride Of Chucky [1999] Bride Of Chucky | DVD | (11/03/2002) from £9.25  |  Saving you £-1.99 (-19.90%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Brace yourself: this is a clever, consistently entertaining and even inspired continuation of the mean-spirited slasher series. For those not in the know, Chucky is a mop-top kid's doll come to life with the soul of a serial killer and the voice of Brad Dourif (doing his best Jack Nicholson). Revived by his former paramour Tiffany (Jennifer Tilly, looking every inch a life-size Barbie in stiletto heels and skintight black leather), Chucky proceeds to turn his human sweetie into a pint-sized Talking Tina doll with attitude, and together they hit the road for a magic amulet and young new bodies to inhabit. They hitch a ride with sweet young runaways Katherine Heigl and Nick Stabile and leave a trail of corpses bloodied, burned and cut to ribbons. The kids are cute, but the real heat is generated by the latex lovers who use murder as foreplay and consummate their renewed romance in a night of passionate sex ("Shouldn't you wear a rubber?" "I'm all rubber!"). Hong Kong director Ronny Yu (The Bride with White Hair) directs with a light touch and against all odds transforms walking dolls Chucky and Tiffany into funny, energetic, full-blooded characters: l'amour fou has never been more crazy. John Ritter costars as Heigl's overprotective uncle (another obstacle on the road to dolly freedom) and Alexis Arquette is hilarious as a lanky goth nerd. The wild conclusion leaves room for another high-concept sequel. The DVD features two commentary tracks, a behind-the-scenes documentary, and "Jennifer Tilly's Diary." --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

  • Mr. Brooks [2007] Mr. Brooks | DVD | (10/03/2008) from £4.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Consider Mr. Brooks. A successful businessman a generous philanthropist a loving father and devoted husband. Seemingly he's perfect. But Mr. Brooks has a secret - he is an insatiable serial killer so lethally clever that no one has ever suspected him -- until now. Kevin Costner stars as Earl Brooks a man who has managed to keep his two incompatible worlds from intersecting by controlling his cunning wicked alter ego Marshall (William Hurt) whom he blames for his wrongdoings. But now as Mr. Brooks succumbs to one last murderous urge an amateur photographer (Dane Cook) witnesses the crime. Suddenly Brooks finds himself entangled in the dark agenda of an opportunistic bystander as well as hunted by the unorthodox and tenacious detective Tracy Atwood (Demi Moore). Can Mr. Brooks outsmart his adversaries and conceal his shocking double life from his wife (Marg Helgenberger) and daughter (Danielle Panabaker) or will someone expose his crimes and his identity once and for all in this unpredictable and electrifying new thriller.

  • The Hitcher The Hitcher | DVD | (05/10/2009) from £2.64  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Grace Andrews and Jim Halsey are a collegiate couple who are tormented by the mysterious hitchhiker John Ryder a.k.a. The Hitcher. The young couple hit the road in a 1970 Oldsmobile 442 en route to spring break. But their pleasure trip soon turns into a waking nightmare!

  • Stoker [DVD] [2013] Stoker | DVD | (01/07/2013) from £3.11  |  Saving you £16.88 (84.40%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Stoker is a masterful psychodrama that teems with unsettling vibrations that hark directly back to Alfred Hitchcock, but also to the wave of contemporary cinema that has been surging in South Korea for the past decade. It is the first American feature by the auteur Park Chan-wook, whose widely seen trilogy of "revenge" films, Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, and Lady Vengeance, paved the way for the meticulous craftsmanship of Stoker. The inspiration for Wentworth Miller's haunting script was Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt, though Stoker makes for an altogether creepier tale of a mysterious uncle, his melancholy niece, and the deadly interplay of family secrets slowly revealed. Park's delicate weaving of style transforms the material into a narrative symphony, with thematic elements conveyed in the smallest details of composition, art direction, and graceful cinematography. Mia Wasikowska is India Stoker, the teenage niece who just lost her father to a violent auto accident. It's a complete surprise to India and her mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman) when his handsome younger brother Charlie (Matthew Goode) shows up at the brooding family mansion (itself a character that is integral to the story). Charlie's enigmatic smirk signals both calm and danger, and his presence is a catalyst that ratchets up the emotional turmoil India and Evelyn are already experiencing. India senses the danger even as she is drawn to Charlie, and her mother's repressed sexuality turns into a bonfire under his mysterious charm. He tempts and teases them both in an expertly choreographed dance of menace that fuels the rage building in India and puts further pressure on her mother's cataclysmic despair. Charlie's psychopathic presence infests the brooding, yet deceptively airy surroundings of the Stoker estate with a sense of peril that is just out of reach. Several key scenes unfold at the family dinner table, where poison lurks in Freudian undercurrents and maybe in the food and wine, too. The most mesmerising sequence captures a visit from the sheriff, who's investigating the murder of one of India's schoolmates. The crime is just one of many acts of deadly violence that erupt with jarring force in the past, present, and future of Stoker's disturbing timeline. As the sheriff talks to India and Charlie, the camera swirls around to the rhythm of the scene, separating, uniting, then retreating from them in a virtuosic room-to-room sweep. The extended take says much more about the interplay of India and Charlie's dread connection than the oblique dialogue. It's also a breathtaking illustration of Park's obsessive attention to shot design. But Stoker is much more than an exercise in style; it is also an unnerving and understated thriller that gives big rewards for all that attention to detail. To say that there are plot twists is an understatement for a movie whose elegant creativity is the biggest twist of all. --Ted Fry

  • Halloween [1978] Halloween | DVD | (25/09/2006) from £3.99  |  Saving you £2.00 (33.40%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The Night He Came Home Perhaps the most influential and successful independent film ever made Halloween is the movie that put director John Carpenter on the map as a viable filmmaker. An exercise in simple pure horror Halloween takes us into the world of a mad killer Michael Myers who at a very young age stabbed his older sister to death. Locked away for many years in a mental hospital Michael escapes one night and returns to his home to continue his killing spree. Jamie Lee Curtis in her first role plays the resourceful babysitter who is chased by the killer on Halloween night. Produced for very little money and a tight shooting schedule Halloween was a stunning success when it was released. Written by John Carpenter and his longtime producer Debra Hill the film set both their careers on fire with both of them working together many times over the next 25 years. The film also made a star out of Jamie Lee Curtis and turned the slasher movie into a viable successful genre. Halloween has been copied parodied and even turned into a franchise of its own but the original is still considered the best of the bunch. Halloween was John Carpenter's first foray into horror and remains the standard to which all other modern horror films are measured.

  • Awaydays [DVD] [2009] Awaydays | DVD | (28/09/2009) from £5.79  |  Saving you £12.20 (67.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    When Carty meets Elvis at a Bunnymen gig they fall headlong into a volatile friendship that each of them aches for but neither can control. Violent sexy and funny Awaydays is a blade-sharp rites-of-passage that buzzes with the post-punk energy of its late-70s Liverpool setting. Based on the classic novel by Kevin Sampson and pulsating to a soundtrack of Joy Division The Cure Magazine Echo & The Bunnymen and Ultravox Awaydays examines identity fate the nature of male longings and their need to belong. It is the first major feature film to be set during and evocatively portray the first dawning of the football casual fashion cult. Quadrophenia meets Control. Trainspotting meets Stand By Me. Awaydays is all of these - A Catcher In The Rye with switchblades.

  • 16 Years Of Alcohol [2003] 16 Years Of Alcohol | DVD | (24/01/2005) from £9.50  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Richard Jobson formerly of Glasgow punk band The Skids writes and directs for the first time with a gritty tale of alcohol and domestic abuse in Scotland. As a young boy Frankie Mac (McKidd) watches the world around him drench itself in alcohol. His father who has always been an iconic figure to Frankie is seen for the first time as a philandering liar. In his teenage years Frankie heads a gang. They thrive on music clothes and violence. However a chance meeting with Helen (F

  • Kiss of the Dragon [2001] Kiss of the Dragon | DVD | (12/08/2002) from £2.49  |  Saving you £15.50 (86.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    In Kiss of the Dragon, Chinese undercover agent Jet Li chops his way through Paris after he's framed in some sketchily defined drug sting operation. The fight sequences are tough and quite brutal, and the over-the-top finale is arguably worth the price of admission, wherein an implacable Li takes on the entire Paris Police Bureau, working his way up toward police chief Tchéky Karyo's office through cops, a pair of peroxide-blond twin henchmen, and a whole class of kung fu cadets. Coscreenwriter Luc Besson (La Femme Nikita) should know by now what makes for a nifty genre piece, but the woeful dialogue is a shame, and there aren't nearly enough action sequences to get your blood boiling. Poor Bridget Fonda gives it the old-school try in a thankless role as an ex-junkie prostitute from the Midwest whose young daughter is being held captive by duplicitous police chief/drug lord/pimp Karyo (who fairly inhales the scenery). Director Chris Nolan might have pushed further the strangers-in-a-strange-land camaraderie between Li and Fonda, but the script still would've sunk him. --Steve Wiecking On the DVD: Kiss of the Dragon is a film that relies on its superbly choreographed fight scenes, so luckily the anamorphically enhanced 2.35:1 widescreen presentation is spotless. The Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track positively shakes the room in the action sequences and atmospheric music by Craig Armstrong perfectly underscores the highs and lulls in the drama. Extras are plentiful: the audio commentary from Director Chris Nahon with Jet Li and Bridget Fonda is informative. "Jet Li--Fighting Philosophy" is a 12-minute bluffer's guide to Li and his life on and off-screen. "Cory Yuen--Action Academy" is about the work of long-time Li collaborator Yuen and details his fighting methodology. The "Police Gymnasium Fight: Martial Arts Demo" follows Yuen and fellow stuntmen blocking the stunning battle sequence. There are also a number of production stills and trailers for other Fox releases. --Kristen Bowditch

  • Saw [Blu-ray] [2004] Saw | Blu Ray | (30/03/2009) from £3.59  |  Saving you £11.40 (76.10%)  |  RRP £14.99

    How much blood would you shed to stay alive? Awakening from a drugged stupor Dr Lawrence Gordon (Cary Elwes) finds himself chained to a pipe in a dingy bathroom with another man (Leigh Whannell) in the same situation across the room. The men are the latest victims of the Jigsaw Killer a maniac who uses elaborate traps to test his victims' dedication to life. Given six hours a hacksaw and a bullet Dr. Gordon tries to figure out a way to freedom hoping his kidnapped family (including Monica Potter) can survive the nightmare as well. Hot on the Jigsaw's trail is Detective David Tapp (Danny Glover) an equally as insane cop who was once the victim of the Jigsaw's evil scheme.

  • The White Ribbon [Blu-ray] The White Ribbon | Blu Ray | (15/03/2010) from £8.65  |  Saving you £11.34 (56.70%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Winner of the Palme d'Or Cannes Film Festival 2009 In an isolated Protestant village in northern Germany strange accidents occur which gradually take on the character of a punishment ritual. Who is behind it all? Operating at the peak of his considerable artistic powers master filmmaker Michael Haneke (Funny Games Hidden) has created a rich sinister and utterly compelling mystery set during the years immediately prior to World War I.

  • Thirst [DVD] [2009] Thirst | DVD | (25/01/2010) from £16.64  |  Saving you £3.35 (16.80%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A priest becomes a vampire... another man's wife is coveted... a deadly seduction triggers murder. Thirst is the new film from director Park Chan-wook (Old Boy Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance Sympathy for Lady Vengeance). Already a boxoffice smash in Korea Thirst was honored with the Prix du Jury [Jury Prize] at the 2009 Cannes International Film Festival. Continuing his explorations of human existence in extreme circumstances the director spins a tale that he conceived and then developed over several years with co-screenwriter Chung Seo-kyung. Sang-hyun (Song Kang-ho) is a priest who cherishes life; so much so that he selflessly volunteers for a secret vaccine development project meant to eradicate a deadly virus. But the virus takes the priest and a blood transfusion is urgently ordered up for him. The blood he receives is infected so Sang-hyun lives - but now exists as a vampire. Struggling with his newfound carnal desire for blood Sang-hyun's faith is further strained when a childhood friend's wife Tae-ju (Kim Ok-vin) comes to him asking for his help in escaping her life. Sang-hyun soon plunges into a world of sensual pleasures finding himself on intimate terms with the Seven Deadly Sins.

  • Death Proof Death Proof | DVD | (06/03/2008) from £5.39  |  Saving you £10.60 (66.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Director Quentin Tarantino delivers an adrenaline shot to the heart with Death Proof a peddle to the metal white knuckle ride behind the wheel of a psycho serial killer's roving revving racing death machine. Kurt Russell (Escape from New York The Thing Silkwood) stars as a sociopathic stuntman whose taste for stalking sexy young ladies gets him into big trouble when he tangles with the wrong gang of badass babes. Their confrontation escalates to a hair-raising 18-minute automotive duel with one of the girls strapped to the hood of a thundering Dodge Challenger that will have you on the edge of your seat mile after mile. Referencing some classic chase movies - from H.B. Halicki's self-financed Gone in 60 Seconds which contained a non-stop forty minute car chase to Vanishing Point the nihilistic chase flick to Dirty Mary Crazy Larry a Peter Fonda vehicle - Tarantino once again mixes genres to perfection fusing the chase and slasher flicks and coming up with something truly original. Death Proof is also Tarantino's most linear film: Events are presented chronologically and breaks in time are punctuated with title cards. Though the action is sequential the contents of this unfamiliar structure are no less intriguing than that of any of his previous films. Kurt Russell turns in a superb virtuoso performance in Death Proof as the truly evil devious deranged lunatic Stuntman Mike - a psychotic serial killer and Hollywood stunt double who uses his 'death proof' Chevy to fulfil his murderous lust. Joining Russell as Tarantino's girls are Rosario Dawson (Sin City Rent 25th Hour) Rose McGowan (Planet Terror The Black Dahlia TV's Charmed) and Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Die Hard 4.0 Factory Girl). In addition real-life stuntwoman Zo Bell (Uma Thurman's body double in Kill Bill) playing herself to wonderful effect proves to be more than a match for Stuntman Mike ensuring the film's climax is an exhilarating 100% stunt action triumph - and all done without any use of CGI effects! So if you want to experience the thrill of the ride that is Death Proof and are prepared to have your senses mashed to pulp in the process then you're in for a sadistic treat when the DVD hits the streets.

  • Dead Girl [DVD] Dead Girl | DVD | (15/03/2010) from £4.08  |  Saving you £1.91 (31.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Set in Los Angeles The Dead Girl is a story about a dead girl told in five chapters. A woman miserable in her circumscribed life caring for her domineering mother finds a body. Somehow this discovery allows her to change. At the morgue the sister of a girl missing for 15 years believes the body is that of her sister; this liberates her. An older woman married to a man who pays her little attention finds evidence in a storage unit; how will she handle it? The mother of the dead girl who left home some years before visits the last place her daughter lived and makes her own discoveries. Last we flash back to the victim's final day.

  • Kill Bill, Volume 2 [2004] Kill Bill, Volume 2 | DVD | (16/08/2004) from £2.49  |  Saving you £12.91 (71.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The Bride" (Uma Thurman) gets her satisfaction--and so do we--in Quentin Tarantino's "roaring rampage of revenge", Kill Bill, Vol. 2. Where Vol. 1 was a hyper-kinetic tribute to the Asian chop-socky grindhouse flicks that have been thoroughly cross-referenced in Tarantino's film-loving brain, Vol. 2--not a sequel, but Part Two of a breathtakingly cinematic epic--is Tarantino's contemporary martial-arts Western, fuelled by iconic images, music and themes lifted from any source that Tarantino holds dear, from the action-packed cheapies of William Witney (one of several filmmakers Tarantino gratefully honours in the closing credits) to the spaghetti epics of Sergio Leone. Tarantino doesn't copy so much as elevate the genres he loves, and the entirety of Kill Bill is clearly the product of a singular artistic vision, even as it careens from one influence to another. Violence erupts with dynamic impact, but unlike Vol. 1, this slower grand finale revels in Tarantino's trademark dialogue and loopy longueurs, reviving the career of David Carradine (who plays Bill for what he is: a snake charmer), and giving Thurman's Bride an outlet for maternal love and well-earned happiness. Has any actress endured so much for the sake of a unique collaboration? As the credits remind us, "The Bride" was jointly created by "Q&U", and she's become an unforgettable heroine in a pair of delirious movie-movies (Vol. 3 awaits, some 15 years hence) that Tarantino fans will study and love for decades to come. --Jeff Shannon

  • Dawn of the Dead [DVD] Dawn of the Dead | DVD | (20/09/2010) from £10.89  |  Saving you £9.10 (45.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Possibly one of the greatest films of the 70's. Romero's pseudo-sequel to 'Night Of The Living Dead' places its heroes in a world overrun by flesh-eating Zombies. After securing an apartment building overcome with flesh-eating zombies two Philadelphia area SWAT team members Peter and Roger flee to a television station where they escape in the station's helicopter with Francine and Stephen - two station employees. Seeking refuge from the zombies and the ensuing hysteria they land on the roof of a Pittsburgh area shopping mall despite the fact that the undead seem to be flocking there... What begins as a stop for supplies becomes a longer stay as the four become embroiled in a futile war within the mall to consume retail goods and remain alive. The only difference between them and the zombies is that they aren't dead...

  • Halloween [1978] Halloween | DVD | (10/10/2005) from £14.99  |  Saving you £-15.97 (-266.60%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Perhaps the most influential and successful independent film ever made Halloween is the movie that put director John Carpenter on the map as a viable filmmaker. An exercise in simple pure horror Halloween takes us into the world of a mad killer Michael Myers who at a very young age stabbed his older sister to death. Locked away for many years in a mental hospital Michael escapes one night and returns to his home to continue his killing spree. Jamie Lee Curtis in her first role plays the resourceful babysitter who is chased by the killer on Halloween night. Produced for very little money and a tight shooting schedule Halloween was a stunning success when it was released. Written by John Carpenter and his longtime producer Debra Hill the film set both their careers on fire with both of them working together many times over the next 25 years. The film also made a star out of Jamie Lee Curtis and turned the slasher movie into a viable successful genre. Halloween has been copied parodied and even turned into a franchise of its own but the original is still considered the best of the bunch. Halloween was John Carpenter's first foray into horror and remains the standard to which all other modern horror films are measured.

  • Veronica Guerin [2003] Veronica Guerin | DVD | (26/01/2004) from £3.49  |  Saving you £12.50 (78.20%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Dublin Sunday Independent reporter Veronica Guerin (Blanchett) exposes some of the city's most powerful underworld leaders whatever the cost... Based on actual events. In the mid-1990s Dublin was nothing short of a war zone with a few powerful drug lords battling for control. Their most fearsome opponent was not the police but the courageous Veronica Guerin (Blanchett) who investigated and exposed the ""pushers"" balancing her home and family against her responsibility to her rea

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