HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

PSP UMD Movies

  • Hostel [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] Hostel | UMD | (01/01/1980) from £14.90  |  Saving you £-1.91 (-14.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Bad Santa [UMD Universal Media Disc] Bad Santa | UMD | (14/11/2005) from £13.98  |  Saving you £6.01 (30.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    When washed-up crooked and corrupt department store Santa Willie T. Stokes (Academy Award Winner Billy Bob Thornton Best Screenplay 1996 Sling Blade) isn't making appearances at shopping malls he's a safecracker who makes an annual big score on Christmas Eve. But when Willie and his midget partner Marcus (Tony Cox Me Myself & Irene) come to Phoenix for their next heist they fall under the suspicious eye of Bob (John Ritter Tadpole) the store manager and Gin (Bernie Mac Ocean's Twelve) a savvy mall detective. Willie also has to deal with an 8-year-old misfit who believes that the frequently-intoxicated and foul-mouthed Willie is the real Santa.A bawdy laugh-out-loud experience Bad Santa is the ultimate festive movie for people who don't like Christmas.

  • The Evil Dead [UMD Universal Media Disc] The Evil Dead | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £14.61  |  Saving you £-8.62 (-143.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

  • The World Is Not Enough [UMD Mini for PSP] The World Is Not Enough | UMD | (01/12/2008) from £3.25  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    In his 19th screen outing The World is Not Enough, Ian Fleming's super-spy is once again caught in the crosshairs of a self-created dilemma: as the longest-running feature-film franchise, James Bond is an annuity his producers want to protect, yet the series' consciously formulaic approach frustrates any real element of surprise beyond the rote application of plot twists or jump cuts to shake up the audience. This time out, credit 007's caretakers for making some visible attempts to invest their principal characters with darker motives--and blame them for squandering The World is Not Enough's initial promise by the final reel. By now, Bond pictures are as elegantly formal as a Bach chorale, and this one opens on an unusually powerful note. A stunning pre-title sequence reaches beyond mere pyrotechnics to introduce key plot elements as the action leaps from Bilbao to London. Pierce Brosnan undercuts his usually suave persona with a darker, more brutal edge largely absent since Sean Connery departed. Equally tantalising are our initial glimpses of Bond's nemesis du jour, Renard (Robert Carlyle), and imminent love interest, Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), both atypically complex characters cast with seemingly shrewd choices and directed by the capable Michael Apted. The story's focus on post-Soviet geopolitics likewise starts off on a savvy note, before being overtaken by increasingly Byzantine plot twists, hidden motives and reversals of loyalty superheated by relentless (if intermittently perfunctory) action sequences. Bond's grimmer demeanour, while preferable to the smirk that eventually swallowed Roger Moore whole, proves wearying, unrelieved by any true wit. The underlying psychoses that propel Renard and Elektra eventually unravel into unconvincing melodrama, while Bond is supplied with a secondary love object, Denise Richards, who is even more improbable as a nuclear physicist. Ultimately, this world is not enough despite its better intentions. --Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com On the DVD: There are three different documentaries on this disc, as well as a "Secrets of 007" featurette that cuts between specific stunt sequences, behind-the-scenes footage and storyboards to reveal how it was all done, and a short video tribute to Desmond Llewelyn ("Q"), who died not long after this movie was released. The first "making of" piece is presented by an annoyingly chirpy American woman and is aimed squarely at the MTV market (most fascinating is watching her interview with Denise Richards in which the two orthodontically enhanced ladies attempt to out-smile each other). "Bond Cocktail" gamely distils all the essential ingredients that make up the classic Bond movie formula--gadgets, girls, exotic locations and lots of action. Most interesting of all is "Bond Down River", a lengthy dissection of the opening boat chase sequence. Director Michael Apted provides the first commentary, and talks about the challenges of delivering all the requisite ingredients. The second commentary is less satisfactory, since second unit director Vic Armstrong, production designer Peter Lamont and composer David Arnold have little in common. There's also the Garbage song video, and the booklet has yet more behind-the-scenes info. The anamorphic CinemaScope picture and Dolby digital sound are as spectacular as ever. --Mark Walker

  • The Silence of the Lambs [UMD Mini for PSP] [DVD] The Silence of the Lambs | UMD | (11/08/2008) from £2.60  |  Saving you £-2.99 (-49.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Based on Thomas Harris's novel, Jonathan Demme's terrifying adaptation of Silence of the Lambs contains only a couple of genuinely shocking moments (one involving an autopsy, the other a prison break). The rest of the film is a splatter-free visual and psychological descent into the hell of madness, redeemed astonishingly by an unlikely connection between a monster and a haunted young woman. Anthony Hopkins is extraordinary as the cannibalistic psychiatrist Dr Hannibal Lecter, virtually entombed in a subterranean prison for the criminally insane. At the behest of the FBI, agent-in-training Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) approaches Lecter, requesting his insights into the identity and methods of a serial killer named Buffalo Bill (Ted Levine). In exchange, Lecter demands the right to penetrate Starling's most painful memories, creating a bizarre but palpable intimacy that liberates them both under separate but equally horrific circumstances. Demme, a filmmaker with a uniquely populist vision (Melvin and Howard, Something Wild), also spent his early years making pulp for Roger Corman (Caged Heat) and he hasn't forgotten the significance of tone, atmosphere and the unsettling nature of a crudely effective close-up. Much of the film, in fact, consists of actors staring straight into the camera (usually from Clarice's point of view), making every bridge between one set of eyes to another seem terribly dangerous. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com On the DVD: On disc one, the film itself looks clinically sharp in a faultless widescreen (1.85:1) anamorphic transfer, while the Dolby 5.1 soundtrack makes the most of the chilling sound effects and Howard Shore's masterfully understated score. Unlike the Region 1 Criterion Collection, however, there is no audio commentary at all. On the second disc, the all-new hour-long "making-of" documentary features contributions from the screenwriter, producer, composer, costume designer, make-up effects people and even the moth wrangler ("There were no moths harmed in the filming!") as well as Ted Levine (Buffalo Bill) and Anthony Hopkins, who talks at length about creating Lecter. Conspicuous by their absence are Jonathan Demme and Jodie Foster. Aside from the usual trailers and stills gallery there are 21 deleted scenes, many of which are not whole scenes but deleted excerpts, a promotional featurette made in 1991 and an outtakes reel that proves the cast really did have fun making this scary picture. For those who want to scare all their friends, there's also an answerphone message from Anthony Hopkins "in character". --Mark Walker

  • Beef Ii [UMD Universal Media Disc] Beef Ii | UMD | (29/08/2005) from £2.99  |  Saving you £-1.62 (-10.80%)  |  RRP £14.99

  • Cursed [UMD Universal Media Disc] Cursed | UMD | (03/10/2005) from £3.04  |  Saving you £15.95 (84.00%)  |  RRP £18.99

  • Predator [UMD Universal Media Disc] Predator | UMD | (07/11/2005) from £3.49  |  Saving you £10.90 (49.60%)  |  RRP £21.99

  • White Chicks [UMD Universal Media Disc] White Chicks | UMD | (05/12/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £-4.60 (-35.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Paula Rego - Telling Tales [DVD] [UMD Mini for PSP] Paula Rego - Telling Tales | UMD | (10/08/2009) from £9.99  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Born in Portugal Paula Rego is one of Britain's leading artists. This intimate film follows the artist from her retrospective at the Reina Sofia in Madrid back to the privacy of her studio in London while she talks with humour and candour about her compulsion to produce works that though accessible deal with the most private themes.

  • Mad Max [UMD Mini for PSP] [1979] [DVD] Mad Max | UMD | (01/01/2008) from £2.35  |  Saving you £-0.99 (-16.50%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The story of Mel Gibson's stately anti-hero begins in Mad Max, George Miller's low-budget debut, in which Max is a "Bronze" (cop) in an unspecified post-apocalyptic future with a buddy-partner and family. But, unlike most films set in the devastated future, Mad Max is notable because it is poised between our industrialised world and total regression to medieval conditions. The scale tips towards disintegration when the Glory Riders burn into town on their bikes like an overcharged cadre of Brando's Wild Ones. Representing the active chaos that will eventually overwhelm the dying vestiges of civil society they take everything dear to Max, who then has to exact due revenge. His flight into the same wilds that created the villains artfully sets up the morally ambiguous character of the subsequent films. --Alan E Rapp, Amazon.com

  • Terminator 3 - Rise Of The Machines [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2003] Terminator 3 - Rise Of The Machines | UMD | (05/12/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £-4.60 (-35.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Saw Uncut [UMD Universal Media Disc] Saw Uncut | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £16.23  |  Saving you £1.76 (9.80%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Adam (Leigh Whannell) wakes up in a dank room across from Dr. Lawrence Gordon (Cary Elwes) and the body of a guy who has blown his own brains out. Not a happy place, obviously, and it gets worse when both men realise that they've been chained and pitted against one another by an unseen but apparently omniscient maniac who's screwing with their psyches as payment for past sins. Director James Wan, who concocted this grimy distraction with screenwriter Whannell, has seen Seven and any number of other arty existential-psycho-cat-and-mouse thrillers, so he's provided Saw with a little flash, a little blood, and a lot of ways to distract you from the fact that it doesn't make a whole hell of a lot of sense. Wan and Whannell (who's not the most accomplished actor, either) pile on the plot twists, which after some initially novel ideas become increasingly juvenile. Elwes works hard but looks embarrassed, and the estimable Danny Glover suffers as the obsessed detective on the case. The denouement will probably surprise you, but it won't get you back the previous 98 minutes. --Steve Wiecking

  • Hitman [UMD Mini for PSP] Hitman | UMD | (30/06/2008) from £2.25  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    It?s hard not to feel like one has entered a certain dimension of video-game logic while watching Hitman, a lightly enjoyable action-suspense movie indeed based on a popular and bloody game about a mysterious hired gun with a bar-code tattoo on his bald head and a number (47) in lieu of a name. Living like a chaste monk while slipping past borders to kill his targets, 47 (Timothy Olyphant of Deadwood) moves like a determined shark and speaks softly to his contact at the enigmatic "the Organization," which raises cast-off children to become well-paid assassins. Fruitlessly pursued by an Interpol cop (Dougray Scott) who can never get sovereign governments to cooperate, 47 has no trouble slipping in and out of countries to ply his trade. Until, that is, he?s set up to take a fall in Russia by shooting a national leader who is promptly replaced by a lookalike double. Suddenly on the run, 47 has to retrace his steps and formulate a lethal plan for extricating himself from a trap. Caught in the chaos is the lovely Nika (Olga Kurylenko), forced into sex slavery by 47?s new enemies and the one person who seems uniquely qualified to break through 47?s many personal barriers. Directed by France?s Xavier Gens, Hitman features loads of bloody mayhem and unabashed moments of pulp absurdity, such as a scene in which 47 and three other Organization killers agree to fight one another respectfully, then proceed to pulverize each other with swords and fists. As fodder for gamers, however, Hitman is packed with visuals and dramatic moments that seem so odd on the big screen until one realizes they are basically placemarkers for the video-game edition. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • The Chronicles of Narnia:  The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe | UMD | (03/04/2006) from £11.42  |  Saving you £-2.62 (-13.80%)  |  RRP £18.99

    C.S. Lewis's classic novel The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe makes an ambitious and long-awaited leap to the screen in this modern adaptation. It's a CGI-created world laden with all the special effects and visual wizardry modern filmmaking technology can conjure, which is fine so long as the film stays true to the story that Lewis wrote. And while this film is not a literal translation--it really wants to be so much more than just a kids' movie--for the most part it is faithful enough to the story, and whatever faults it has are happily faults of overreaching, and not of holding back. The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe tells the story of the four Pevensie children, Lucy, Peter, Edmund, and Susan, and their adventures in the mystical world of Narnia. Sent to the British countryside for their own safety during the blitz of World War II, they discover an entryway into a mystical world through an old wardrobe. Narnia is inhabited by mythical, anthropomorphic creatures suffering under the hundred-year rule of the cruel White Witch (Tilda Swinton, in a standout role). The arrival of the children gives the creatures of Narnia hope for liberation, and all are dragged into the inevitable conflict between evil (the Witch) and good (Aslan the Lion, the Messiah figure, regally voiced by Liam Neeson). Director (and co-screenwriter) Andrew Adamson, a veteran of the Shrek franchise, knows his way around a fantasy-based adventure story, and he wisely keeps the story moving when it could easily become bogged down and tiresome. Narnia is, of course, a Christian allegory and the symbology is definitely there (as it should be, otherwise it wouldn't be the story Lewis wrote), but audiences aren’t knocked over the head with it, and in the hands of another director it could easily have become pedantic. The focus is squarely on the children and their adventures. The four young actors are respectable in their roles, especially considering the size of the project put on their shoulders, but it's the young Georgie Henley as the curious Lucy who stands out. This isn't a film that wildly succeeds, and in the long run it won't have the same impact as the Harry Potter franchise, but it is well done, and kids will get swept up in the adventure. Note: Narnia does contain battle scenes that some parents may consider too violent for younger children. --Dan Vancini

  • Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2001] Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone | UMD | (20/03/2006) from £11.59  |  Saving you £12.40 (51.70%)  |  RRP £23.99

  • Assault On Precinct 13 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Assault On Precinct 13 | UMD | (03/10/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

  • Underworld Special Edition [UMD Universal Media Disc] Underworld Special Edition | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Underworld is a hybrid thriller that rewrites the rulebook on werewolves and vampires--imagine Blade meets The Crow and The Matrix. It's a "cuisinart" movie (blend a lot of familiar ideas and hope something interesting happens) in which immortal vampire "death dealers" wage an ancient war against "Lycans" (werewolves), who've got centuries of revenge--and some rather ambitious genetic experiments--on their lycanthropic agenda. Given his preoccupation with gloomy architecture (mostly filmed in Budapest, Hungary), frenetic mayhem and Gothic costuming, it's no surprise that first-time director Len Wiseman gained experience in TV commercials and the art departments of Godzilla, Men in Black and Independence Day. His work is all surface, no substance, filled with derivative, grand-scale action as conflicted vampire Selene (Kate Beckinsale, who later became engaged to Wiseman) struggles to rescue an ill-fated human (Scott Speedman) from Lycan transformation. It's great looking all the way, and a guaranteed treat for horror buffs, who will eagerly dissect its many strengths and weaknesses. --Jeff Shannon

  • Pirates Of The Caribbean [UMD Universal Media Disc] Pirates Of The Caribbean | UMD | (05/09/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £18.99

    You won't need a bottle of rum to enjoy Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, even if you haven't experienced the Disneyland theme-park ride that inspired it. There's a galleon's worth of fun in watching Johnny Depp's androgynous performance as Captain Jack Sparrow, a roguish pirate who could pass for the illegitimate spawn of rockers Keith Richards and Chrissie Hynde. Depp gets all the good lines and steals the show, recruiting Orlando Bloom (a blacksmith and expert swordsman) and Keira Knightley (a lovely governor's daughter). They set out on an adventurous quest to recapture the notorious Black Pearl, a ghost ship commandeered by Jack's nemesis Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush), a mutineer desperate to reverse the curse that left him and his (literally) skeleton crew in a state of eternal, undead damnation. Director Gore Verbinski (The Ring) repeats the redundant mayhem that marred his debut film Mouse Hunt, but with the writer's of Shrek he's made Pirates of the Caribbean into a special-effects thrill-ride that plays like a halloween party on the open seas. --Jeff Shannon

  • Spider-Man 2 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Spider-Man 2 | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £17.59  |  Saving you £0.40 (2.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us