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PSP UMD Movies

  • Peter Kay: Special Edition [UMD Universal Media Disc] Peter Kay: Special Edition | UMD | (19/12/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • Final Fantasy VII - Advent Children [UMD Universal Media Disc] Final Fantasy VII - Advent Children | UMD | (24/04/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Bottom - Series 1 [UMD Universal Media Disc] [1991] Bottom - Series 1 | UMD | (26/12/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • Doctor Who - The New Series - Series 1 - Vol. 3: Episodes 7 To 10 [UMD Universal Media Disc] Doctor Who - The New Series - Series 1 - Vol. 3: Episodes 7 To 10 | UMD | (26/12/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • The Longest Yard [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2005] The Longest Yard | UMD | (16/01/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2001] Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone | UMD | (20/03/2006) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £23.99

  • Sin City [UMD Universal Media Disc] Sin City | UMD | (26/09/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £18.99

  • The Silence of the Lambs [UMD Mini for PSP] [DVD] The Silence of the Lambs | UMD | (11/08/2008) from £2.60  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Based on Thomas Harris's novel, Jonathan Demme's terrifying adaptation of Silence of the Lambs contains only a couple of genuinely shocking moments (one involving an autopsy, the other a prison break). The rest of the film is a splatter-free visual and psychological descent into the hell of madness, redeemed astonishingly by an unlikely connection between a monster and a haunted young woman. Anthony Hopkins is extraordinary as the cannibalistic psychiatrist Dr Hannibal Lecter, virtually entombed in a subterranean prison for the criminally insane. At the behest of the FBI, agent-in-training Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) approaches Lecter, requesting his insights into the identity and methods of a serial killer named Buffalo Bill (Ted Levine). In exchange, Lecter demands the right to penetrate Starling's most painful memories, creating a bizarre but palpable intimacy that liberates them both under separate but equally horrific circumstances. Demme, a filmmaker with a uniquely populist vision (Melvin and Howard, Something Wild), also spent his early years making pulp for Roger Corman (Caged Heat) and he hasn't forgotten the significance of tone, atmosphere and the unsettling nature of a crudely effective close-up. Much of the film, in fact, consists of actors staring straight into the camera (usually from Clarice's point of view), making every bridge between one set of eyes to another seem terribly dangerous. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com On the DVD: On disc one, the film itself looks clinically sharp in a faultless widescreen (1.85:1) anamorphic transfer, while the Dolby 5.1 soundtrack makes the most of the chilling sound effects and Howard Shore's masterfully understated score. Unlike the Region 1 Criterion Collection, however, there is no audio commentary at all. On the second disc, the all-new hour-long "making-of" documentary features contributions from the screenwriter, producer, composer, costume designer, make-up effects people and even the moth wrangler ("There were no moths harmed in the filming!") as well as Ted Levine (Buffalo Bill) and Anthony Hopkins, who talks at length about creating Lecter. Conspicuous by their absence are Jonathan Demme and Jodie Foster. Aside from the usual trailers and stills gallery there are 21 deleted scenes, many of which are not whole scenes but deleted excerpts, a promotional featurette made in 1991 and an outtakes reel that proves the cast really did have fun making this scary picture. For those who want to scare all their friends, there's also an answerphone message from Anthony Hopkins "in character". --Mark Walker

  • Sweeney Todd - The Demon Barber of Fleet Street [UMD Mini for PSP] Sweeney Todd - The Demon Barber of Fleet Street | UMD | (19/05/2008) from £1.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £9.99

    After years of rumours, it turns out that Tim Burton was the perfect visionary to film Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Stephen Sondheim's Broadway masterpiece, and the result is a macabre and moving musical movie as enthralling as anything Burton has ever done. The show's mix of gothic horror, Grand Guignol, very dark humor, and witty and beautiful music never was the stuff of traditional musical comedy, but it's a powerful work, and perhaps the richest of the late 20th century. In the movie, Burton's frequent collaborator, Johnny Depp, plays Todd, a wronged man whose lust for revenge drives him to murder (an 19th-century legend who has been traced to a real-life barber). Helena Bonham Carter, another Burton mainstay, is Mrs. Lovett, the barber's partner-in-unspeakable-crime. It's no surprise that Depp is an excellent choice to convey Todd's brooding intensity and volcanic rage, but he can also sing a score that is so challenging it has often played in opera houses (though not with the same style as the Broadway original, Len Cariou, and he occasionally lapses into pop style). Bonham Carter is small of voice and lacks the humour of the original Broadway Lovett, Angela Lansbury, but she sings on pitch, in rhythm, and in character at the same time, which is no small feat for a Sondheim show. Aficionados will regret the loss of certain musical passages--"The Ballad of Sweeney Todd" is just an instrumental overture and the chorus is gone altogether, among others, but the reassuring presence of orchestrator Jonathan Tunick and conductor Paul Gemignani ensures that the music feels right and sounds great. And the film's depiction of a Victorian London hellhole, with cinematography by Dariusz Wolski and costumes by Colleen Atwood, also looks and feels right. The excellent cast is filled out by Alan Rickman as the villainous Judge Turpin, Timothy Spall as his seedy Beadle, Sacha Baron Cohen as a rival barber, Jamie Campbell Bower as the young lover Anthony, Jayne Wisener as his object of affection, and Ed Sanders as the young Toby. For fans of Tim Burton and Johnny Depp who don't think they like musicals, Sweeney Todd should be a revelation (though not for the squeamish, as the gore is intense and completely appropriate). For fans of Broadway and Sondheim, it's hard to imagine getting a better adaptation than this. The fact that there's no newly composed Oscar-bait song sung by a Josh Groban-type over the end credits only makes it better. --David Horiuchi

  • The Mummy Returns [UMD Universal Media Disc] The Mummy Returns | UMD | (05/09/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • Predator [UMD Mini for PSP] Predator | UMD | (10/12/2007) from £4.95  |  Saving you £-5.10 (-85.10%)  |  RRP £5.99

    A team of commandos, on a mission in a Central American jungle, find themselves hunted by an extra-terrestrial warrior. Manufacturer: Boulevard Entertaiment

  • Dark Star [UMD Universal Media Disc] [1974] Dark Star | UMD | (30/01/2006) from £3.75  |  Saving you £5.01 (31.30%)  |  RRP £15.99

    In the mid twenty-first century mankind has reached a point in its technological advances to enable colonization of the far reaches of the universe. Dark Star is a futuristic scout ship traveling far in advance of colony ships. Armed with Exponential Thermostellar Bombs it prowls the unstable planets. But there is one obstacle that its crew members did not count on - one of the ships thinking and talking bombs is lodged in the bay threatening to destroy the entire ship and crew! John Carpenter and Dan O'Bannon combine their writing creative and technical talents to bring you this thrilling and extraordinary science fiction parody.

  • WWE - Tombstone - The History Of The Undertaker [UMD Universal Media Disc] WWE - Tombstone - The History Of The Undertaker | UMD | (05/12/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Matrix Revolutions [UMD Mini for PSP] Matrix Revolutions | UMD | (07/01/2008) from £2.49  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £5.99

    The opening reels of Matrix Revolutions do nothing to dispel the feeling of exhausted disappointment that set in during the second half of The Matrix Reloaded. There's plenty more talky guff combined with the picking-up of hard-to-remember plot threads as Neo (Keanu Reeves) lies in a coma in the "real" world and is stranded on a tube station in a limbo "beyond the Matrix" while his allies do a reprise of the shooting-their-way-past-the-bodyguards bit from the last film (this time, the baddies can walk on the ceiling). A new Oracle (Mary Alice) makes some pronouncements about the end being near and more things happen--including the evil Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) manifesting in reality by possessing a minor character and perfidiously blinding our hero, who wears a becoming ribbon over his wounded eyes and perceives the world in an impressive "flaming truth vision". What about the action? The equivalent of the last film's freeway chase scene is a huge face-off as the Sentinels (robot squids) finally breach the caverns of Zion, "the last human city", and swarm against a battalion of pilot-manipulated giant robots: here, the effects are seamless and the images astonishing, though the fact that none of the major characters are involved and the whole thing goes on so long as if designed to top any previous robot-on-robot screen carnage means that it becomes monotonously amazing, like watching someone else play a great computer game. After a too-easily-managed major realignment of the enmities, the film--and the series--finally delivers a sign-off sequence that's everything you could want as Neo and Smith get into a kung fu one-on-one in a rain-drenched virtual city, flying as high as Superman and Brainiac in smart suits. It comes too late to save the day and the wrap-up is both banal and incoherent, but at least this single combat is a reward for hardy veterans who've sat through seven hours of build-up. --Kim NewmanOn the DVD: when the first Matrix DVD was released, with never-before-seen features such as the "Follow the White Rabbit" option, it set a benchmark against which subsequent discs were judged. But neither sequel has lived up to the original's high standards. The Matrix Revolutions two-disc set is an unexceptional package, with a routine "making of" featurette being the main bonus item. Amid all the usual backslapping guff about how great everyone is and what a great time they've all had, it's possible to glean some nuggets of useful information about the baffling plot--though cast and crew can't repress a note of weariness creeping in when discussing the horribly protracted shooting schedule. The feature on the CG Revolution is the most informative for people who like to know how everything was done, and, in the same vein, there's also a multi-angle breakdown of the Super Burly Brawl. A 3-D timeline gives a handy summary of the story so far, and there's a plug for The Matrix Online game. The anamorphic 2.40:1 picture is, of course, a real treat to look at, even if the movie is mostly shades of dark grey and dark green; soundwise the dynamic range of the Dolby Digital surround is extreme: all conversations are conducted in throaty whispers, while the action sequences will push your speakers to the limit. No DTS option, though. And as with Reloaded, there's no audio commentary either: the Wachowski's policy of not talking about their creation begins to seem like a ploy to avoid answering awkward questions. --Mark Walker

  • Ultimate Force - Series 1 - Episodes 1 To 6 [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2003] Ultimate Force - Series 1 - Episodes 1 To 6 | UMD | (30/01/2006) from £15.99  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £15.99

  • Ghost In The Shell [UMD Universal Media Disc] Ghost In The Shell | UMD | (17/10/2005) from £11.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

  • Team America - World Police [UMD Universal Media Disc] [2004] Team America - World Police | UMD | (28/11/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

  • Blade [UMD Universal Media Disc] Blade | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £17.99

    The recipe for Blade is quite simple; you take one part Batman, one part horror flick, and two parts kung fu and frost it all over with some truly campy acting. What do you get? An action flick that will reaffirm your belief that the superhero action genre did not die in the fluorescent hands of Joel Schumacher. Blade is the story of a ruthless and supreme vampire slayer (Wesley Snipes) who makes other contemporary slayers (Buffy et al.) look like amateurs. Armed with a samurai sword made of silver and guns that shoot silver bullets, he lives to hunt and kill "Sucker Heads". Pitted against our hero is a cast of villains led by Deacon Frost (Stephen Dorff), a crafty and charismatic vampire who believes that his people should be ruling the world, and that the human race is merely the food source they prey on. Born half-human and half-vampire after his mother had been attacked by a blood-sucker, Blade is brought to life by a very buff-looking Snipes in his best action performance to date. Apparent throughout the film is the fluid grace and admirable skill that Snipes brings to the many breathtaking action sequences that lift this movie into a league of its own. The influence of Hong Kong action cinema is clear, and you may even notice vague impressions of Japanese anime sprinkled innovatively throughout. Dorff holds his own against Snipes as the menacing nemesis Frost, and the grizzly Kris Kristofferson brings a tough, cynical edge to his role as Whistler, Blade's mentor and friend. Ample credit should also go to director Stephen Norrington and screenwriter David S. Goyer, who prove it is possible to adapt comic book characters to the big screen without making them look absurd. Indeed, quite the reverse happens here: Blade comes vividly to life from the moment you first see him, in an outstanding opening sequence that sets the tone for the action-packed film that follows. From that moment onward you are pulled into the world of Blade and his perpetual battle against the vampire race. --Jeremy Storey

  • Bad Boys [UMD Universal Media Disc] Bad Boys | UMD | (01/09/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £17.99

    A cheerfully over-the-top action film, Bad Boys is notable chiefly for the rapport between its two stars, Will Smith and Martin Lawrence, as two Miami cops on the trail of a drug kingpin as they try to protect a witness (Tea Leoni). Smith is the swinging bachelor and Lawrence the family man, and both must juggle their personal lives as they baby-sit the one chance they have to recover a stolen drug shipment, save their jobs, and take down the drug dealer. While the film is almost always implausible and its story is something seen many times before, director Michael Bay (The Rock) keeps things moving stylishly and at a feverish pace, as Smith and Lawrence prove themselves a terrific comic pairing. Their odd couple banter flies at a faster clip than the bullets and explosions, and becomes the best reason to see this hyperbolic but entertaining action flick. --Robert Lane

  • Donnie Darko [UMD Mini for PSP] [2001] Donnie Darko | UMD | (03/12/2007) from £1.99  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £12.99

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