HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

Search Results

  • Carry On - The Complete Collection [DVD] [1958] Carry On - The Complete Collection | DVD | (07/10/2013) from £28.95  |  Saving you £1.04 (3.50%)  |  RRP £29.99

    This is classic British comedy at it's best! This DVD box set contains all 30 hilarious Carry On movies plus a host of DVD extras! Starring: Kenneth Williams Charles Hawtrey Jim Dale Joan Sims Barbara Windsor Hattie Jacques Windsor Davies Valerie Leon Peter Butterworth Bernard Bresslaw Terry Scott Bill Maynard Phil Silvers Patsy Rowlands and Frankie Howerd. Episodes Comprise: Carry On Sergeant Carry On Nurse Carry On Teacher Carry On Constable Carry On Regardless Carry On Cruising Carry On Cabby Carry On Jack Carry On Spying Carry On Cleo Carry On Cowboy Carry On Screaming! Carry On Don't Lose Your Head Carry On Follow That Camel Carry On Doctor Carry On Up the Khyber Carry On Camping Carry On Again Doctor Carry On Up the Jungle Carry On Loving Carry On Henry Carry On at Your Convenience Carry On Matron Carry On Abroad Carry On Girls Carry On Dick Carry On Behind Carry On England That's Carry On!' and 'Carry On Emmanuelle Special Features: 30 feature-length audio commentaries Trailers All 13 Episodes of the ATV situation comedy series: 'Carry On Laughing' Archive interviews with Sid James Terry Scott and Phil Silvers On location featurette hosted by June Whitfield The official 40th anniversary documentary: 'What's A Carry On?' Textless footage from 'Carry On Jack' and 'Carry On Spying' An alternative Director's cut presentation of 'Carry On England' Extensive production notes for all 30 films Stills Gallery

  • The Jazz Singer [1981] The Jazz Singer | DVD | (02/10/2006) from £11.99  |  Saving you £-5.00 (-29.40%)  |  RRP £16.99

    Back in 1927, The Jazz Singer entered the history books as the first true, sound-on-film talking picture, with Al Jolson uttering the immortal words, "You ain't heard nothing yet!" But even then it was a creakingly sentimental old yarn. By the time this second remake showed up in 1980 (there was a previous one in 1953) it looked as ludicrously dated as a chaperone in a strip club. Our young hero, played by pop singer Neil Diamond in a doomed bid for movie stardom, is the latest in a long line of Jewish cantors, but secretly moonlights with a Harlem soul group. When his strictly Orthodox father (Laurence Olivier, complete with painfully hammy "oya-veh" accent) finds out, the expected ructions follow. Though the lad makes it big in showbiz, it all means nothing while he's cut off from family and roots. But in the end--well, you can guess, can't you? Diamond comes across as likeable enough in a bland way, but unencumbered by acting talent, and the music business has never looked so squeaky clean--nary a trace of drugs, and precious little sex or rock 'n' roll. As for anything sounding remotely like jazz, forget it. This is one story that should have been left to slumber in the archives. --Philip Kemp

  • Little Caesar [1931] Little Caesar | DVD | (19/06/2006) from £11.58  |  Saving you £-2.01 (-11.20%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Edward G. Robinson stars as Enrico Bandelli in the role that made him a household name. Bandelli moves to the big city with partner in crime Joe Massara (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.) and becomes a member of Sam Vettori's Mafia gang. In spite of the urgings of pretty girl Olga Strassoff (Glenda Farell) to quit the mob Rico quickly becomes the head of the Vettori gang and with a couple of quick kills scares mob boss Arnie Lorch back to Detroit. Bandelli dubbed Little Caesar by the press is known as a boss in his own right but what goes up must come down...

  • The Charge Of The Light Brigade [1968] The Charge Of The Light Brigade | DVD | (26/01/2009) from £17.99  |  Saving you £-6.66 (-41.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The Charge of the Light Brigade was an infamous battle in the Crimean War considered one of the greatest military blunders in history and immortalized in the poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson. The ill-conceived expedition to the Crimea was marked by an incredible lack of strategy and planning inadequate weapons camouflage food health care and communications. In the final battle all the soldiers had to protect them was their courage and blind faith. As Tennyson put it: Ours is not to question why/Ours is but to do and die. The film is a classic dissection of the pointlessness of war and the horrors inflicted on the common man who goes to fight in the name of his country. Directed by Tony Richardson and starring Trevor Howard Vanessa Redgrave (Atonement Howards End) and John Gielgud (Murder on the Orient Express Arthur The Charge of the Light Brigade was nominated for 6 BAFTAs.

  • The Odd Couple [1967] The Odd Couple | DVD | (02/09/2002) from £7.99  |  Saving you £-7.98 (-61.40%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Neil Simon's classic stage comedy made an effortless transition to the big screen in 1967, when The Odd Couple provided Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau with a tailor-made mid-career affirmation of their status as two of cinema's greatest funny men. Lemmon is Felix, manically obsessed with cleanliness and housekeeping, struggling to understand why his wife wants a divorce. Matthau is Oscar, his slovenly poker-playing buddy who invites him to take the spare room and lives to regret it as they rapidly and comically come to grief like an old, totally incompatible, married couple, revealing exactly why their respective wives have had enough. "I don't think two single men living alone in a big eight-room apartment should have a cleaner house than my mother", Matthau wails, trying to make sense of the disintegrating situation. The pair devour Simon's typically sharp and witty script in a frenzy of classic one-liners that allow Lemmon's trademark twitchy neurosis and Matthau's baleful cussedness to flourish. Great as they are, though, they are nearly eclipsed in the funniest scene of the film by Monica Evans and Carole Shelly as a couple of British expatriate sisters from the apartment upstairs. Carry On innuendo briefly meets Manhattan repartee and the screen crackles with brilliance. It's a comic masterclass. On the DVD: The Odd Couple on disc has no extras apart from the original cinema trailer, but the film, presented in 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen, with Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, is pristine, Neal Hefti's score providing that instantly identifiable flavour of sophisticated 1960s American comedy. --Piers Ford

  • Steve Irwin's Most Dangerous Adventures Steve Irwin's Most Dangerous Adventures | DVD | (18/11/2002) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Steve Irwin: the Australian conservationist and 'Crocodile Hunter' his adventures made all the more poignant due to his untimely death on September 4 2006. His fearlessness in facing the deadliest of all species was his passion and while filming his newest series he was killed by the normally docile Sting-ray. Steve's filmed adventures remain a tribute to the man who brought light-entertainment combined with heart-pounding action to the world. Steve's ultimate aim was to ensure peop

  • The Planets [DVD] The Planets | DVD | (18/08/2009) from £12.20  |  Saving you £-8.03 (-61.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Explore the edges of the unknown with this 3 disc box set. Offering a close look at Saturn Mars and Jupiter and Mercury and Venus

  • The London Box Set [DVD] The London Box Set | DVD | (15/06/2009) from £30.00  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £30

    Boxset Contains: 1. Pool Of London 2. The Small World Of Sammy Lee 3. The Yellow Balloon 4. The London Nobody Knows / Les Bicyclettes De Bellsize

  • Strauss; Salome Strauss; Salome | DVD | (01/09/2008) from £23.57  |  Saving you £6.42 (21.40%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Salome, composed by Richard Strauss. Performed by The Orchestra of the Royal Opera House and conducted by Philippe Jordan.

  • Notorious [1946] Notorious | DVD | (30/10/2000) from £22.98  |  Saving you £-16.99 (-283.60%)  |  RRP £5.99

    One of Alfred Hitchcock's classics, this romantic thriller features a cast to die for: Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant and Claude Rains. Bergman plays the daughter of a disgraced father who is recruited by American agents to infiltrate a post-World War II spy ring in Brazil. Her control agent is Grant, who treats her with disdain while developing a deep romantic bond with her. Her assignment: to marry the suspected head of the ring (Rains) and get the goods on everyone involved. Danger, deceit, betrayal--and, yes, romance--all come together in a nearly perfect blend as the film builds to a terrific (and surprising) climax. Grant and Bergman rarely have been better. --Marshall Fine

  • NASA's Greatest Missions NASA's Greatest Missions | DVD | (23/03/2009) from £27.51  |  Saving you £-7.52 (-37.60%)  |  RRP £19.99

    It is now possible to relive all the most exciting moments in NASA's history. See the phenomenally powerful space rockets launch men into space. Experience the incredible sensation of the first spacewalk and watch in awe as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walk on the moon for the very first time. Included are candid interviews with the astronauts scientists and engineers who made it all happen.

  • Rebecca Rebecca | DVD | (01/01/2008) from £8.07  |  Saving you £-2.08 (-34.70%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Whilst on holiday, young timid ladies companion (Joan Fontaine) meets handsome and wealthy widower Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) whose wife Rebecca has recently died in a boating accident.The two fall in love and marry. However, her joy is short lived when she returns to the de Winter estate and soon discovers that Rebecca still has a strange, unearthly hold over everyone there.

  • Bear Grylls - Born Survivor - Series 3 [DVD] Bear Grylls - Born Survivor - Series 3 | DVD | (08/06/2009) from £21.02  |  Saving you £8.97 (29.90%)  |  RRP £29.99

    Series three of Born Survivor sees presenter Bear Grylls travel to the furthest ends of the earth in search of action and adventure. From the jagged peaks of the Baja peninsula to the scorching sands of Namibia Bear takes on almost impossible obstacles; battling the elements to show you how to survive in some of the world's toughest places. As if the environments weren't dangerous enough Bear takes on the wildlife; he wrestles an alligator in the Louisiana swamps reacts violently to a bee-sting in Mexico and goes into underground tunnels hunting for porcupine with the San bushmen in Namibia.

  • The Song Of Bernadette [1943] The Song Of Bernadette | DVD | (18/10/2004) from £12.05  |  Saving you £-7.23 (-55.70%)  |  RRP £12.99

    In 1858 Lourdes resident Bernadette Sobrirous a poverty-stricken peasant girl witness a vision of a 'beautiful lady'. However news of the 'miracle' polarises opinion in the town: adoration suspicion and greed among the simple townspeople stubborn scepticism from the local doctor and charges of insanity from the town prosecutor... Winner of four Oscars.

  • As You Like It [1936] As You Like It | DVD | (12/02/2007) from £21.02  |  Saving you £-8.03 (-61.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Laurence Olivier and Elisabeth Bergner star in this enchanting and highly acclaimed adaptation of William Shakespeare's classic comedy. Rosalind (Elisabeth Bergner) the daughter of an exiled Duke falls in love with Orlando (Laurence Olivier) the son of one of her father's courtiers. When Orlando continues to ignore her Rosalind decides the best way to be at his side is by disguising herself as a boy. Her deception works too well as Orlando would rather be in the boy's company than hers! How Rosalind works out her predicament is all part of the fun and farce. Filmed in England in 1936 when Olivier was still considered a 'promising young actor' rather than one of the finest actors ever to play Shakespeare As You Like It is in fact Olivier's first filmed Shakespearean performance and therefore a genuine milestone in film history. This outstanding production boasts a distinguished supporting cast which includes John Laurie and Felix Aylmer as well as editing by David Lean camerawork by the legendary Jack Cardiff and a script adaptation co-authored by J.M. Barrie of 'Peter Pan' fame.

  • The Sound Of Music - 2 disc Special Edition [1965] The Sound Of Music - 2 disc Special Edition | DVD | (09/04/2001) from £4.49  |  Saving you £13.45 (67.30%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The most widely seen movie produced by a Hollywood studio, The Sound of Music grows fresher with each viewing. Though it was planned meticulously in pre-production (save for the scene where Maria and the children take a dipping in an Austrian lake that nearly cost a life), on each viewing one is struck anew by the spontaneous almost improvisatory air of the acting, notably of Julie Andrews under Robert Wise's direction. There are also the little human touches he brings to, for instance, the scene where Maria leads the children to the hills, over bridges and along tow paths where the smallest boy trips up and momentarily gets left behind: it creates a feeling that most of us have encountered. From the opening pre-credit sequence of muted excitement as the camera roves over the Austrian Alps (photographed in magnificent colour), where little phrases from the wind instruments on the soundtrack are flung as if on the breeze, foreshadowing the title song to follow, the production never puts a foot wrong. On the DVD: On the first disc the film itself has never looked or sounded better since its original presentation in Todd AO (prints of which are said to have disappeared forever). The disc also contains a separate audio guide that takes the viewer through the film sequence by sequence, with director Robert Wise commenting on the weather, the production design by Boris Leven, the sequences filmed on location and in Hollywood (like the interiors of the Von Trapp villa), and the naming of other actors who were eager for the lead roles, notably Doris Day and Yul Brynner. On the second disc there are the documentaries. "Salzburg Sight and Sound" was Charmian Carr's own record of her time on location in the summer of 1964, playing Liesl, the eldest Von Trapp daughter. "From Fact to Fiction", running two hours, begins with the birth of Maria in 1905 who inspired the film, charts her subsequent marriage to Captain Von Trapp, their escape from Nazi Germany not across the Alps but via a train across the Italian boarder, their home in Vermont and thence to the German film of the family that was brought to the attention of Rodgers and Hammerstein as an ideal vehicle for a stage musical. A second group of documentaries covers previews, television and radio commercials and a 1973 interview with Wise and Andrews. Overall, this is a marathon package but in its way is as compelling as the film itself. --Adrian Edwards

  • The Best Of Ealing Collection [DVD] The Best Of Ealing Collection | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £16.85  |  Saving you £14.07 (40.20%)  |  RRP £34.99

    Titles Comprise: Kind Hearts And Coronets: Set in the stately Edwardian era Kind Hearts And Coronets is black comedy at is best with the most articulate and literate of all Ealing screenplays. Sir Alec Guinness gives a virtuoso performance in his Ealing comedy debut playing all eight victims standing between a mass-murderer and his family fortune. Considered by some to be Ealing's most perfect achievement of all the Ealing films. The Ladykillers director Alexander Mackendrick's third Ealing farce is the final comedy produced by the famous British studio and one of its most celebrated. Like the equally applauded Kind Hearts And Coronets the film is more sophisticated and blacker in tone than typically lighthearted Ealing fare (such as Mackendrick's Whiskey Galore!). Alec Guinness stars as the superbly shifty toothily threatening Professor Marcus the leader of a crime ring planning a heist. Marcus rents rooms from a sweet eccentric old lady Mrs. Wilberforce (Katie Johnson) in her crooked London house. The professor and his co-conspirators blowhard Major Courtney (Cecil Parker) creepily suave Louis (Herbert Lom) chubby Harry (Peter Sellers) and muscleman One-Round (Danny Green) pose as an unlikely string quartet using the rooms for rehearsal. Dodging Mrs. Wilberforce's constant interruptions the hoods hit upon the idea to use her in the daring daylight robbery (filmed in and around London's King's Cross station). When the old girl discovers the truth Marcus and company cannot persuade her to stay buttoned up about it and thus decide to do her in. Accompanied by a noirish cacophony of screeching trains parrots and little old ladies at afternoon tea a series of unlikely events builds to the hilarious surprising finale. The Man In The White Suit: Sidney Stratton (Alec Guinness) works quietly at Michael Corland's (Michael Gough) textile mill until his mysterious costly lab experiment is discovered. Fired by Corland Stratton takes a menial job at Alan Birnley's (Cecil Parker) mill in order to continue his work on the sly. When Daphne (Joan Greenwood) Corland's fianc''e and Birnley's daughter discovers his secret she threatens to expose Stratton. The desperate scientist reveals to Daphne that he has invented an indestructible cloth that never gets dirty. Close to realizing his vision Stratton celebrates by having a white suit made of the fabric (because it repels dye). The trouble however is just beginning. The lowly mill workers (who spout market economics in rough accents) fear for their jobs while the mill owners led by the decrepit Godfather-esque Sir John Kierlaw (Ernest Thesiger) worry about their profits. Passport To Pimlico: An archaic document found in a bombsite reveals that the London district of Pimlico has for centuries technically been part of France. The local residents embrace their new found continental status seeing it as a way to avoid the drabness austerity and rationing of post-war England. The authorities do not however share their enthusiasm... The Lavender Hill Mob: Mr. Holland (Alec Guinness) has supervised the bank's bullion run for years. He is fussy and unnecessarily overprotective but everyone knows he is absolutely trustworthy. And so on the day the bullion truck is robbed he is the last person to be suspected. But there is another side to Mr. Holland; he is also Dutch the leader of the Lavender Hill Mob.

  • Foxhole In Cairo [DVD] Foxhole In Cairo | DVD | (08/02/2010) from £8.00  |  Saving you £-8.03 (-61.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    The Western Desert. 1942. Rommels Afrika Korps have driven the British Army back to Cairo and are poised for a final attack. Now, all the Nazis need to know is where the 8th Army will make their last stand. Two Nazi agents are sent into Cairo to seize the plans and find themselves caught up in a deadly game of cat-and-mouse in the sleazy nightclubs and back streets of the city.

  • Went The Day Well? [1942] Went The Day Well? | DVD | (13/11/2006) from £19.49  |  Saving you £-8.03 (-61.80%)  |  RRP £12.99

    On the Whitsun weekend of 1942 in the idyllic village of Bramley End German paratroopers disguised as sappers attempt to set up equipment to disrupt Britain's radar defences yet haven't counted on the indomitable spirit of the English villagers! Directed by the Italian director Alberto Cavalcanti and produced by Ealing Studios Went The Day Well? was a commercial feature based loosely upon Graham Greene's fictional short story 'The Lieutenant Died Last'.

  • Black Narcissus [1947] Black Narcissus | DVD | (26/09/2005) from £14.99  |  Saving you £-2.95 (-14.80%)  |  RRP £19.99

    When Bernardo Bertolucci went to the Himalayas to film Little Buddha, so the anecdote runs, he was disappointed by the scenery. Somehow, the real thing didn't quite live up to what he'd been led to expect by Powell and Pressburger's Black Narcissus. It's not hard to see why he felt let down. Their film is almost ridiculously gorgeous--a procession of saturated Technicolor, Expressionist angles, theatrical lighting and overwrought design. It has a good claim to being the high watermark of lushness in the British cinema (and, incidentally, every original foot of it was actually shot in Britain). No wonder it took the Oscar for colour cinematography (shot by Jack Cardiff) as well as for art direction and set decoration (created by Alfred Junge).Audiences loved it on its first release, but the critics were cooler: hadn't the story been upstaged by the baroque images? Well, probably, but that's not altogether a bad thing, since the plot--quite faithful to Rumer Godden's popular novel --isn't wholly free of corn. A group of five Anglican nuns, led by Sister Clodagh (Deborah Kerr) establish a school and hospital in a former harem among the Himalayan peaks. The wind blows, the drums pound, the Old Gods stir, and one by one the celibate sisters succumb to unchaste thoughts, above all Sister Ruth (Kathleen Byron, terrific in the role), so consumed by erotic yearning for the one Englishman in sight (David Farraar) she puts on crimson lipstick, wears her wimple-free tresses like an early Goth and takes a downward turn. (Black Narcissus features the greatest scene involving a nun and a high place this side of Hitchcock's Vertigo and Jacques Rivette's La Religieuse.) Silly, to be sure, but also sublime at times and as curiously entertaining as it is picturesque. --Kevin Jackson

Not found what you're looking for?
Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us