HOME POPULAR TITLES NEW RELEASES DVD PRICE WATCH DVD BOX SETS BLU-RAY MOBILE HELP
Join us on Facebook

Search Results

  • Logan [DVD] [2017] Logan | DVD | (10/07/2017) from £4.95  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    In the near future, a weary Logan cares for an ailing Professor X in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan's attempts to hide from the world and his legacy are up-ended when a young mutant arrives, being pursued by dark forces.

  • Pretty Woman [1990] Pretty Woman | DVD | (12/09/2005) from £4.49  |  Saving you £10.50 (70.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

  • Billy Elliot [2000] Billy Elliot | DVD | (18/04/2006) from £4.49  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Foursquare in the gritty-but-hearwarming tradition of Brassed Off and The Full Monty comes Billy Elliot, the first film of noted British theatrical director Stephen Daldry. The setting is County Durham in 1984, and things 'oop North are even grimmer than usual: the miners' strike is in full rancorous swing and 11-year-old Billy's dad and older brother, miners both, are staunch on the picket lines. Billy's got problems of his own. His dad's scraped together the fees to send him to boxing lessons, but Billy's discovered a different aptitude: a genius for ballet dancing. Since admitting to such an activity is tantamount, in this fiercely macho culture, to holding up a sign reading "I AM A RAVING POOF", Billy keeps it quiet. But his teacher, Mrs Wilkinson (Julie Walters, wearily undaunted) thinks he should audition for ballet school in London. Family ructions are inevitable. Daldry's film sidesteps some of the politics, both sexual and otherwise, but scores with its laconic dialogue (credit to screenwriter Lee Hall) and a cracking performance from newcomer Jamie Bell as Billy. His powerhouse dance routines, more Gene Kelly than Nureyev, carry an irresistible sense of exhilaration and self-discovery. Among a flawless supporting cast Stuart Wells stands out as Billy's sweet gay friend Michael. And if the miners' strike serves largely as background colour, there's one brief episode, as visored and truncheoned cops rampage through neat little terraced houses, that captures one of the most spiteful episodes in recent British history. --Philip Kemp

  • Macbeth [DVD] Macbeth | DVD | (01/02/2016) from £5.69  |  Saving you £14.30 (71.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard star in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy. After three witches foretell that Scottish nobleman Macbeth (Fassbender) will be king he becomes obssessed by the idea. Encouraged by his wife Lady Macbeth (Cotillard), his ambition becomes all-consuming and he kills the reigning monarch, King Duncan (David Thewlis). But Macbeth becomes a tyrannical ruler, filled with anxiety over who he can trust... The cast also includes Elizabeth Debicki, Sean Harris, Paddy Considine and David Hayman.Based on: The play by William Shakespeare Technical Specs: Languages(s): EnglishInteractive Menu

  • Bridesmaids [DVD] Bridesmaids | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £2.22  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Kristen Wiig leads the cast as Annie, a maid of honor whose life unravels as she leads her best friend, Lillian (Maya Rudolph), and a group of colorful bridesmaids (Rose Byrne, Melissa McCarthy, Wendi McLendon-Covey and Ellie Kemper) on a wild ride down the road to matrimony.Annie's life is a mess. But when she finds out her lifetime best friend is engaged, she simply must serve as Lillian's maid of honor. Though lovelorn and broke, Annie bluffs her way through the expensive and bizarre rituals. With one chance to get it perfect, she'll show Lillian and her bridesmaids just how far you'll go for someone you love.

  • Captain Corelli's Mandolin [2001] Captain Corelli's Mandolin | DVD | (25/03/2002) from £3.48  |  Saving you £13.90 (77.30%)  |  RRP £17.99

    While Captain Corelli's Mandolin may frustrate admirers of Louis de Bernières' densely detailed novel, it proves Shakespeare in Love director John Madden is a worthy craftsman of literary films. It's a tastefully old-fashioned adaptation, preserving the novel's flavour while focusing on its love story set against the turbulence of World War II. Set on the Greek island of Cephallonia, the drama begins in 1940 with occupation by Italian troops, awkwardly allied with the Nazis and preferring hedonistic friendliness over military intimidation. That attitude is most generously embodied by Captain Corelli (Nicolas Cage), who is instantly drawn to the Greek beauty Pelagia (Penélope Cruz) despite her engagement to Mandras (Christian Bale), a resistance fighter whose absence leaves Pelagia needy for affection. Mandras's eventual return--and the inevitable attack by German bombers and ground troops--threaten to stain this Greek-Italian romance with deeply tragic bloodshed. Accompanied by pensive serenades from the captain's cherished mandolin, the film charts the unlikely attraction of Corelli and Pelagia, whose wizened physician father (splendidly played by John Hurt) fears for the worst. Their love is uneasy (and Cage's miscasting doesn't help), but the island's beguiling atmosphere is as seductive to them as it is to the viewer, thus making the outbreak of violence--and a climactic earthquake--jarringly traumatic. Emphasising nobility in war and the many definitions of love, the story's wartime context intensifies the film's admirable depth of emotion. Faults will be found by anyone who's looking for them, but Captain Corelli's Mandolin remains a sensuous, richly layered film that die-hard romantics will find hard to resist.--Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • The Shape of Water [DVD] [2018] The Shape of Water | DVD | (25/06/2018) from £4.99  |  Saving you £1.00 (14.30%)  |  RRP £6.99

    From master storyteller, Guillermo del Toro, comes an other-worldly fairy tale, set against the backdrop of Cold War era America circa 1962. In the hidden government laboratory where she works, lonely Elisa (Sally Hawkins) is trapped in a life of silence and isolation. Elisa's life is changed forever when she and co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer) discover a secret classified experiment.

  • Jersey Boys [DVD] Jersey Boys | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £4.99  |  Saving you £14.50 (72.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    From director Clint Eastwood comes the big-screen version of the Tony Award-winning musical 'Jersey Boys.' The film tells the story of four young men from the wrong side of the tracks in New Jersey who came together to form the iconic 1960s rock group The Four Seasons. The story of their trials and triumphs are accompanied by the songs that influenced a generation including 'Sherry ' 'Big Girls Don't Cry ' 'Walk Like a Man ' 'Dawn ' 'Rag Doll ' 'Bye Bye Baby ' 'Who Loves You ' and many more.

  • Red Sparrow [DVD] [2018] Red Sparrow | DVD | (09/07/2018) from £4.99  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £6.99

    Jennifer Lawrence is Dominika, a former ballerina forced to enter Sparrow School, a secret government program that trains young recruits to manipulate, seduce and kill. She emerges as a dangerous agent, but is trapped in a world she desperately wants to escape. With the lives of her loved ones at risk, Dominika must find a way to take back control and serve justice to those who betrayed her.

  • The Heat [DVD] The Heat | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.38  |  Saving you £14.61 (73.10%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Hysterical is perhaps the best word to describe the clashing of policing styles when by-the-book FBI agent Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) and volatile Boston police officer Mullins (Melissa McCarthy) are forced to work together on a complicated drug case. Two strong-spirited women in a field populated by men, both officers have some serious attitude, are generally disliked by their fellow officers, and have a definite problem working with others. When the two are thrown together on a drug case, they immediately detest one another and a war of words begins and quickly turns nasty, and physical. But forced to continue working together, the two women soon discover that even though their methods couldn't be more different, they can get significant results by joining forces. The Heat is funny--laugh-out-loud, split-your-pants, can't-possibly-be-anything-funnier-coming-next funny. The audacity of Mullins with her crass mouth and brash actions is impossible to overstate, and the contrast with Ashburn's prim and proper demeanour and language is hysterical, thanks to good writing and a genuine comedic chemistry between Bullock and McCarthy. Sure, the plot isn't particularly new and the film lags slightly in the middle, but The Heat is one really funny film. --Tami Horiuchi

  • Dogma [1999] Dogma | DVD | (21/10/2002) from £4.32  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Bored of being eternally banished to earth, two errant angels hatch a plan to sneak back into heaven. Unfortunately, if they use the required loophole in religious Dogma, they'll prove God fallible and undo the very fabric of the universe, ending all existence. Bummer. Enter the distant grand niece of Jesus Christ and an army of angels, beautiful mythical figures, saintly apostles and all entities good and holy. And Jay and Silent Bob. The phrase "it's a religious comedy" must have caused Hollywood to have a sacred cow. And, as Smith's first attempt to move away from the early lo-fi, character-centred, relationship-based comedies (Clerks, Mallrats and Chasing Amy) toward the narrative-led big-budget spectacular, Dogma is not without problems. Proving controversial on release, stones were cast by churchgoers and Smith devotees alike. Frothing-mouthed extremists levelled charges of blasphemy at the more colourful elements (a Malcolm X-style 13th apostle, the crucifix being binned as uncool and God not being a white-bearded patriarch), leaving the devoutly Catholic Smith, who's intentions were to celebrate the mystery and beauty of religion, completely bemused. Equally, the Luddite Clerks obsessives who wrote it off as "Smith-gone-Hollywood" should have recognised that the script was written way before he gave us his black-and-white debut. More ambitious than his previous mates-roped-in cheapies, the apocryphal and apocalyptic Dogma is still blessed with water-into-wine performances, pop culture gags, postmodern self-referencing and stoopid shagging jokes. Though it may not be wholly miraculous, this is still a righteous movie; and, in comparison with the average big-buck formulaic Hollywood evil, it's practically saintly.On the DVD: Dogma's budget outstripped the early Smith films by miles, and the 2.35:1 Anamorphic Widescreen transfer does it justice, with divine colour and heavenly sound. The picture quality of the extras--including trailers, TV spots and cast and crew interviews--is not so good and pixilation occurs throughout. The interviews are provocative enough, though, giving huge insight into the film. And it's quite something to see Smith looking all "Clark Kent" in his civvies. --Paul Eisinger

  • Lost In Translation [2004] Lost In Translation | DVD | (28/06/2004) from £2.89  |  Saving you £15.30 (76.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Like a good dream, Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation envelopes you with an aura of fantastic light, moody sound, head-turning love, and a feeling of déjà vu, even though you've probably never been to this neon-fused version of Tokyo. Certainly Bob Harris has not. The 50-ish actor has signed-on for big money shooting whiskey ads instead of doing something good for his career or his long-distance family. Jetlagged, helplessly lost with his Japanese-speaking director and out of sync with the metropolis, Harris (Bill Murray, never better) befriends the married but lovelorn 25-year-old Charlotte (played with heaps of poise by 18-year-old Scarlett Johansson). Even before her photographer husband all but abandons her, she is adrift like Harris but in a total entrapment of youth. How Charlotte and Bill discover their soul mates will be cherished for years to come. Written and directed by Coppola (The Virgin Suicides), the film is far more atmospheric than plot-driven: we whiz through Tokyo parties, karaoke bars and odd nightlife, always ending up in the impossibly posh hotel where the two are staying. The wisps of bittersweet loneliness of Bill and Charlotte are handled smartly and romantically, but unlike modern studio films, this isn't a May to December fling film. Surely and steadily, the film ends on a much-talked-about grace note, which may burn some, yet awards film lovers who "always had Paris" with another cinematic destination of the heart. --Doug Thomas

  • Notting Hill [1999] Notting Hill | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £2.99  |  Saving you £14.03 (70.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    They don't really make many romantic comedies like Notting Hill anymore--blissfully romantic, sincerely sweet, and not grounded in any reality whatsoever. Pure fairy tale, and with a huge debt to Roman Holiday, Notting Hill ponders what would happen if a beautiful, world-famous person were to suddenly drop into your life unannounced and promptly fall in love with you. That's the crux of the situation for William Thacker (Hugh Grant), who owns a travel bookshop in London's fashionable Notting Hill district. Hopelessly ordinary (well, as ordinary as you can be when you're Hugh Grant), William is going about his life when renowned movie star Anna Scott (Julia Roberts) walks into his bookstore and into his heart. After another contrived meeting involving spilled orange juice, William and Anna share a spontaneous kiss (big suspension of disbelief required here), and soon both are smitten. The question is, of course, can William and Anna reconcile his decidedly commonplace bookseller existence and her lifestyle as a jet-setting, paparazzi-stalked celebrity? (Take a wild guess at the answer.) Smartly scripted by Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral) and directed by Roger Michell (Persuasion), Notting Hill is hardly realistic, but as wish fulfilment and a romantic comedy, it's irresistible. True, Roberts doesn't really have to stretch very far to play a big-time actress who makes $15 million per movie, but she's more winning and relaxed than she's been in years, and Grant is sweetly understated as a man blindsided by love. Together, in moments of quiet, they're a charming couple, and you can feel her craving for real love and his awe and amazement at the wonderful person for whom he has fallen. The only blight on the film is its overbearing pop soundtrack, though Elvis Costello's heart-wrenching version of "She" gets poignant exposure. With Rhys Ifans as Grant's scene-stealing, slovenly housemate and Alec Baldwin in a sly, perfectly cast cameo. --Mark Englehart

  • Kes [1969] Kes | DVD | (20/01/2003) from £2.99  |  Saving you £11.90 (74.40%)  |  RRP £15.99

    This was only Ken Loach's second cinema feature but it still ranks as one of his finest and most moving films. Billy, a disaffected young lad living on a soulless Barnsley estate, finds a fledgling kestrel and, for the first time in his life, feels his imagination gripped. With infinite patience--and a book on falconry nicked from a local bookstore--he starts to train the bird. There's no boy-and-his-pet sentimentality here: the relationship between Kes the bird and the puny, taciturn Billy is the kinship, full of wary respect, between two wild creatures, and when Kes for the first time flies free and returns to Billy's wrist, the sense of exhilaration is overwhelming. Although Loach never rams his message home, it's clear that Billy stands for a whole generation of youngsters whose potential, barring some such chance event, will never be even fractionally realised. Chris Menges' photography brings out all the austere beauty of the Yorkshire locations, and Loach draws believable performances from his largely non-professional cast--especially the 14-year-old David Bradley, stunningly convincing as Billy. And anyone who has ever suffered under a bullying, self-satisfied sports teacher will squirm with recognition at the brilliant cameo from the late Brian Glover. --Philip Kemp

  • Sicario [DVD] Sicario | DVD | (01/02/2016) from £5.49  |  Saving you £14.50 (72.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    In Mexico, SICARIO means hitman. In the lawless border area stretching between the U.S. and Mexico, an idealistic FBI agent (Emily Blunt) is enlisted by an elite government task force official (Josh Brolin) to aid in the escalating war against drugs. Led by an enigmatic consultant with a questionable past (Benicio Del Toro), the team sets out on a clandestine journey forcing Kate to question everything that she believes in order to survive.

  • The Lives Of Others [2007] The Lives Of Others | DVD | (17/09/2007) from £6.49  |  Saving you £13.50 (67.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    East Berlin November 1984. Five years before its downfall the former East-German government ensured its claim to power with a ruthless system of control and surveillance. Party-loyalist Captain Gerd Wiesler hopes to boost his career when given the job of collecting evidence against the playwright Georg Dreyman and his girlfriend the celebrated theatre actress Christa-Maria Sieland. After all the ""operation"" is backed by the highest political circles. What he didn't anticipate however was that submerging oneself into the world of the target also changes the surveillance agent. The immersion in the lives of others - in love literature free thinking and speech - makes Wiesler acutely aware of the meagerness of his own existence and opens to him a completely new way of life which he has ever more trouble resisting. But the system once started cannot be stopped. A dangerous game has begun...

  • Little Miss Sunshine Little Miss Sunshine | DVD | (22/01/2007) from £2.18  |  Saving you £13.50 (75.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Little Miss Sunshine is an American family road comedy that shatters the mold. Brazenly satirical and yet deeply human the film introduces audiences to one of the most endearingly fractured families in recent cinema history: the Hoovers whose trip to a pre-pubescent beauty pageant results not only in comic mayhem but in death transformation and a moving look at the surprising rewards of being losers in a winning-crazed culture. A runaway hit at the Sundance Film Festival where it played to standing ovations the film strikes a nerve with everyone who's ever been awestruck by how their muddled families seem to make it after all.

  • V for Vendetta [2006] V for Vendetta | DVD | (31/07/2006) from £3.51  |  Saving you £17.00 (81.00%)  |  RRP £20.99

    Set against the futuristic landscape of totalitarian Britain V For Vendetta tells the story of a young working-class woman named Evey who is rescued from a life-and-death situation by a masked man known only as 'V'. Profoundly complex V is at once literary flamboyant tender and intellectual a man dedicated to freeing his fellow citizens from those who have terrorized them into compliance... The Matrix Trilogy writing/directing team of Larry & And Wachowski adapt Alan Moore's seminal graphic novel into a thought-provoking blockbuster.

  • Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters [DVD] Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters | DVD | (24/06/2013) from £3.19  |  Saving you £16.80 (84.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    There are too many body parts flying around Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters to single out the tongue that has nearly been gnawed off in the cheek of its clever premise that fairy-tale heroes have grown up into savage supernatural mercenaries. Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton strut around like 18th-century Avengers in leather uniforms, cursing up a storm of modern vernacular and bearing an inventive array of historically and mechanically impossible weapons such as grenades, crossbows, tasers, machine guns, and other weapons of witch-killing mass destruction. It's all a big joke of course, and one that the movie wears boldly and without a shred of irony. To quibble with its gaps in narrative logic or be righteously indignant that the script is often a slapdash mess is to miss the point that it's all meant to be a pile of plain old silly fun. After their childhood trauma at the gingerbread house, the famous Teutonic siblings are now in the business of killing witches full time, hiring themselves out to villages plagued by ugly, evil women wearing loads of scary makeup (Famke Janssen being the evilest and scariest) who feed on the townsfolk's kids. They do their job well and the movie spares no opportunity to show the effect of their fantastical arsenal with profusions of firepower, explosions, viscera, and disgusting cartoon violence, decapitation being the most favoured method of killing by the movie and the title characters both. As the latest in the trend of revisionist fairy-tale telling, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters takes the low road whenever possible, but it does so with a blithe spirit, a foul mouth, and the above-mentioned gore galore to create a B-movie soul that pities any sort of critical over-analysing. It's also pretty funny. There are several inspired offhand moments, such as the missing-children notices slapped on the sides of farmers' milk cans or the way Hansel has to make time for insulin injections because of the gingerbread overdoses he endured at the hand of the proto witch he and Gretel encountered as children. The art direction, wardrobe, and anachronistically engineered props that propel the story all have a cool steampunk design theme and make the silliness pretty hard to resist. Renner, Arterton, and Janssen aren't really taking things too seriously, which is fine because neither are we. This is the American debut of Norwegian director Tommy Wirkola, who brings the same playful gross-out sensibility he did to his 2009 feature Dead Snow. That one was about long-dormant Nazi soldiers rising up as zombies. What fun! It was a lark and a goof, just like Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters. --Ted Fry

  • The History Boys The History Boys | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £2.99  |  Saving you £15.90 (79.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Starring the original stage cast and based on the play by Alan Bennett The History Boys brings together eight bright funny history students in the north of England in the mid '80s. Their Headmaster is obsessed with breaking into the ranks of those schools that regularly send boys up to Oxford and Cambridge and enlists Irwin (Stephen Campbell Moore) a shrewd newcomer to coach the boys into intellectual shape for the trials ahead. Seduced though they are by the exam-busting bag of tricks offered by the temporary supply teacher the boys are torn by their loyalty to the hugely eccentric poetry-spouting English master Hector (Richard Griffiths). As they prepare for the daunting admissions process the journey of the History Boys becomes as much about how education works as it is about where education leads.

Not found what you're looking for?
Privacy Terms and Conditions Partner Programme Help Contact Us