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  • Shirley Valentine [1989] Shirley Valentine | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £4.94  |  Saving you £7.99 (61.50%)  |  RRP £12.99

    Pauline Collins repeats her stage success as the character Shirley Valentine, a married woman who decides in her middle years that she wants more out of life. Leaving her spouse behind, she heads to Greece, where she grows close to a low-key local bloke (Tom Conti). Collins and director Lewis Gilbert (Educating Rita) choose to let the character, as she did in the play, speak directly to the audience at times and the gamble works in terms of creating a gentle, intimate atmosphere. Conti is a bonus, a warm presence and funny to boot. --Tom Keogh

  • Macbeth [1971] Macbeth | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £3.00  |  Saving you £16.99 (85.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Roman Polanski's adaptation of the Shakespearean tragedy Macbeth remains one of the most infamous for a number of reasons: the copious amounts of bloody gore, its expert use of location settings (filmed in North Wales) and Lady Macbeth's nude sleepwalking scene. Despite its notoriety, though, this does remain one of the more compelling film adaptations of the Scottish tragedy, if one of the more pessimistic takes on the story of Macbeth and his overreaching ambition. If you think the play is normally a bit of a downer, you haven't seen Polanski's bleak version of it, made in reaction to the murder of his wife, Sharon Tate, by the Manson "family". Jon Finch (Hitchcock's Frenzy) is a forceful Macbeth, bringing out the Scot's warrior instincts, and Francesca Annis is a memorable Lady Macbeth but the main thrust of the film belongs to Polanski's and noted British playwright and critic Kenneth Tynan's take on the play: extremely violent, nihilistic and visceral; this is down-in-the-dirt, no-holds-barred Shakespeare, not fussy costume drama. Pay close attention to the end, a silent coda that puts a chilling twist on all the action that has come beforehand and foreshadows more tragedy to come. --Mark Englehart

  • Casino Royale [2006] Casino Royale | DVD | (19/03/2007) from £3.79  |  Saving you £19.20 (83.50%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Bond is back! Back to the beginning of James Bond's career MI6's newest recruit (Daniel Craig the first blonde 007) is tasked with taking down a man known as ""Le Chiffre"" (Mads Mikkelsen) a money launderer for terrorists who is raising operational funds at a high-stakes poker game in the exclusive Montenegro establishment of Casino Royale... Exhilarating breathless and at times brutal this is the first Bond adventure since 1987 to be based on one of Ian Fleming's original novels. Paul Haggis (Oscar winning writer/director of Crash) adapts Casino Royale for a new generation as Daniel Craig new Aston Martin DBS in tow fills out the tuxedo of the ultra-smooth and ultra-deadly superspy.

  • Stick Man [DVD] [2016] Stick Man | DVD | (01/02/2016) from £5.69  |  Saving you £4.30 (43.00%)  |  RRP £9.99

    From the creators of the Oscar-nominated films, The Gruffalo and Room on the Broom, comes a new animated short film, Stick Man, based on the picture book written by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Axel Scheffler. Out for his regular jog, Stick Man is picked up by a playful dog and launched on a series of unfortunate adventures which take him ever further away from his family tree. As the seasons pass, Stick Man meets a surprising friend who might just be able to help him home. But will he make it time for Christmas? An exciting and heart warming adventure with the voices of Hugh Bonneville, Rob Brydon, Martin Freeman, Sally Hawkins, Jennifer Saunders, Russell Tovey.

  • Little Miss Sunshine Little Miss Sunshine | DVD | (22/01/2007) from £2.12  |  Saving you £14.40 (80.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Little Miss Sunshine is an American family road comedy that shatters the mold. Brazenly satirical and yet deeply human the film introduces audiences to one of the most endearingly fractured families in recent cinema history: the Hoovers whose trip to a pre-pubescent beauty pageant results not only in comic mayhem but in death transformation and a moving look at the surprising rewards of being losers in a winning-crazed culture. A runaway hit at the Sundance Film Festival where it played to standing ovations the film strikes a nerve with everyone who's ever been awestruck by how their muddled families seem to make it after all.

  • Anchorman 1-2 Box Set [Blu-ray] Anchorman 1-2 Box Set | Blu Ray | (28/04/2014) from £5.75  |  Saving you £-2.74 (-19.20%)  |  RRP £14.24

    Anchorman: The Legend of Ron BurgundyThere was a time before cable when the local anchorman reigned supreme... Enter the hard-hitting world of 1970s local TV news where Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) and his loyal Channel 4 News Team (Paul Rudd Steve Carell and David Koechner) are San Diego's #1 rated news source. All is well in their male-dominated world of news until beautiful rising-star reporter Veronica Corningstone (Christina Applegate) turns it all upside down. Sparks don't just fly they ignite an all-out war between two perfectly coiffed anchor-persons. Anchorman 2: The Legend ContinuesSeven years after capturing the heart of his co-anchor and wife Veronica Corningstone (Christina Applegate) Burgundy (Will Ferrell) is offered the chance of lifetime: to be in on the world's first 24-hour global cable news network GNN in New York City. The newsman quickly rounds up his classic news team - sports guy Champ Kind (David Koechner) man on the street Brian Fantana (Paul Rudd) and weatherman Brick Tamland (Steve Carell) - and heads to The Big Apple. Upon arriving he is quickly challenged by his strong female boss Linda Jackson (Meagan Good) Australian multi-millionaire network owner Kench Allenby (Josh Lawson) and a chiseled popular lead anchor Jack Lime (James Marsden). It's up to Ron and the team to find their own way to the top of news - and the top of the ratings.

  • Downton Abbey: A Moorland Holiday [DVD] Downton Abbey: A Moorland Holiday | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.00  |  Saving you £0.00 (0.00%)  |  RRP £5

    In the Downton Abbey 2014 Christmas Special its the grouse season and Rose’s father-in-law Lord Sinderby has rented Brancaster Castle in Northumberland and invited the Crawleys to a shooting party. While good sport is enjoyed a butler with an axe to grind and a scandalous secret threaten to undermine the holiday. Surprises are in store as the families become better acquainted with each other and some new faces arrive on the scene. Meanwhile the servants hold the fort back at Downton and unlikely later-life romances abound. As Anna faces an uncertain future behind bars Bates takes drastic measures in a bid to clear her name. The seasons change and another Christmas is enjoyed at Downton Abbey. As the family and their servants revel in the festivities there will be romance a heart-breaking farewell sad memories of loved ones lost and a joyful reunion...

  • Steel Magnolias [1989] Steel Magnolias | DVD | (29/01/2001) from £2.99  |  Saving you £15.00 (75.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Based on Robert Harling's play and directed by Herbert Ross, Steel Magnolias is a comedy-drama that follows several years in the lives of women who regularly see one another at a beauty shop in their small Louisiana hometown. The story deepens as Julia Roberts, playing a serious diabetic and the daughter of Sally Field, goes downhill healthwise. But as an ensemble piece, this is one of those enjoyably lumpy tearjerkers with many years' worth of stored truths suddenly being shared between the characters, lots of grievances aired, that sort of thing. Daryl Hannah and Shirley MacLaine assume the most eccentric roles, Dolly Parton the most fun and Olympia Dukakis the most dignified, while Sally Field essentially provides the moral and emotional centre of the movie. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • V for Vendetta [2006] V for Vendetta | DVD | (31/07/2006) from £3.99  |  Saving you £17.00 (81.00%)  |  RRP £20.99

    Set against the futuristic landscape of totalitarian Britain V For Vendetta tells the story of a young working-class woman named Evey who is rescued from a life-and-death situation by a masked man known only as 'V'. Profoundly complex V is at once literary flamboyant tender and intellectual a man dedicated to freeing his fellow citizens from those who have terrorized them into compliance... The Matrix Trilogy writing/directing team of Larry & And Wachowski adapt Alan Moore's seminal graphic novel into a thought-provoking blockbuster.

  • Gandhi Gandhi | DVD | (04/07/2011) from £2.99  |  Saving you £2.99 (49.90%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Gandhi is a great subject, but is Gandhi a great film? Undoubtedly it is, not least because it is one of the last old-school epics ever made, a glorious visual treat featuring tens of thousands of extras (real people, not digital effects) and sumptuous Panavision cinematography. But a true epic is about more than just widescreen photography, it concerns itself with noble subjects too, and the life story of Mahatma Gandhi is one of the noblest of all. Both the man and the film have profound things to say about the meaning of freedom and racial harmony, as well as how to achieve them. Ben Kingsley, in his first major screen role, bears the heavy responsibility of the central performance and carries it off magnificently; without his magnetic and utterly convincing portrayal the film would founder in the very first scene. Sir Richard Attenborough surrounds his main character with a cast of distinguished thespians (Trevor Howard, John Mills, John Gielgud and Martin Sheen, to name but four), none of whom do anything but provide the most sympathetic support. John Briley's literate screenplay achieves the almost impossible task of distilling the bewildering complexities of Anglo-Indian politics. Attenborough's treatment is openly reverential, but, given the saint-like character of his subject, it's hard to see how it could have been anything else. He doesn't flinch from the implication that the Mahatma was naïve to expect a unified India, for example, but instead lets Gandhi's actions speak for themselves. The outstanding achievement of this labour of love is that it tells the story of an avowed pacifist who never raised a hand in anger, of a man who never held high office, of a man who shied away from publicity, and turns it into three hours of utterly mesmerising cinema.On the DVD: The anamorphic (16:9) picture of the original 2.35:1 image has a certain softness to it that may reflect the age of the print, but somehow seems entirely in keeping with the subject . Sound is Dolby 5.1. The extras are fairly brief, but worthwhile: original newsreel footage of Gandhi includes an astonishingly patronising British news account of his visit to England; in a recent interview, Ben Kinglsey chats enthusiastically about the film and the difficulties he experienced bringing the character to life. The dull "making-of" feature is simply a montage of stills. --Mark Walker

  • Zoolander 2 [Blu-ray] [2016] Zoolander 2 | Blu Ray | (04/07/2016) from £2.89  |  Saving you £22.10 (88.40%)  |  RRP £24.99

    Derek Zoolander is back and better-looking than ever in this outrageously funny sequel to the smash hit. Derek and Hansel were once top male supermodels, now reunited to uncover an international conspiracy against the world's most beautiful people. Bonus Features: The Zoolander Legacy Go Big or Go Rome Drake Sather: The Man Who Created Zoolander Youth Milk

  • A Little Princess [1996] A Little Princess | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £3.99  |  Saving you £10.00 (71.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    After the critical success of 1993's The Secret Garden, Warner Bros returned to the novels of Frances Hodgson Burnett to create this 1995 adaptation of A Little Princess, which instantly ranked with The Secret Garden as one of the finest children's films of the 1990s. Neither film was a huge box-office success, but their quality speaks for itself, and A Little Princess has all the ingredients of a timeless classic. A marvel of production design, the film features lavish sets built almost entirely on a studio backlot in Burbank, California. The story opens in New York just before the outbreak of World War I, when young Sara (Liesel Matthews) is enrolled in private boarding school while her father goes off to war. Under the domineering scrutiny of the school's wicked headmistress, Miss Minchen (Eleanor Bron), Sara quickly becomes popular with her schoolmates, but fate intervenes and she soon faces a stern reversal of fortune, resorting to wild flights of fancy to cope with an unexpectedly harsh reality. Rather than label her fanciful tales as escapist fantasy, A Little Princess actively encourages a child's power of imagination--a power that can be used to learn, grow, and adapt to a world that is often cruel and difficult. It's also one of the most visually beautiful films of the 90s and creates a fully detailed world within the boarding school--a place where imagination is vital to survival. A first-class production in every respect, this is one family film that should (if it's not too stuffy to say it) be considered required viewing for parents and kids alike. --Jeff Shannon

  • Saturday Night Fever [1978] Saturday Night Fever | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.00  |  Saving you £10.99 (68.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    The years have endowed Saturday Night Fever with a powerful, elegiac quality since its explosive release in 1977. It was the must-see movie for a whole generation of adolescents, sparking controversy for rough language and clumsily realistic sex scenes which took teen cinema irrevocably into a new age. And of course, it revived the career of the Bee Gees to stratospheric heights, thanks to a justifiably legendary soundtrack which now embodies the disco age. But Saturday Night Fever was always more than a disco movie. Tony Manero is an Italian youth from Brooklyn straining at the leash to escape a life defined by his family, blue collar job and his gang. Disco provides the medium for him to break free. It was the snake-hipped dance routines which made John Travolta an immediate sex symbol. But seen today, his performance as Tony is compelling: rough-hewn, certainly, but complex and true, anticipating the fine screen actor he would be recognised as 20 years later. Scenes of the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn Bridge, representing Tony's route to a bigger world, now have an added poignancy, adding to Saturday Night Fever's evocative power. It's a bittersweet classic. On the DVD: Saturday Night Fever is presented in 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen with a Dolby Digital 5.1 surround soundtrack, both of which help to recapture the unique atmosphere of the late 1970s. The main extra is a director's commentary from John Badham, with detailed descriptions of casting and the improvisation behind many of the scenes, plus the unsavoury reality behind Travolta's iconic white disco suit. --Piers Ford

  • O Brother Where Art Thou? [DVD] [2000] O Brother Where Art Thou? | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.07  |  Saving you £4.92 (49.20%)  |  RRP £9.99

    Only Joel and Ethan Coen, masters of quirky and ultra-stylish genre subversion, would dare nick the plotline of Homer's Odyssey for O Brother, Where Art Thou?, their comic picaresque saga about three cons on the run in 1930s Mississippi. Our wandering hero in this case is one Ulysses Everett McGill, a slick-tongued wise guy with a thing for hair pomade (George Clooney, blithely sending up his own dapper image) who talks his chain-gang buddies (Coen-movie regular John Turturro and newcomer Tim Blake Nelson) to light out after some buried loot he claims to know of. En route they come up against a prophetic blind man on a railroad truck, a burly one-eyed baddie (the ever-magnificent John Goodman), a trio of sexy singing ladies, a blues guitarist who's sold his soul to the devil, a brace of crooked politicos on the stump, a manic-depressive bank robber, and--well, you get the idea. Into this, their most relaxed film yet, the Coens have tossed a beguiling ragbag of inconsequential situations, a wealth of looping, left-field dialogue and a whole stash of gags both verbal and visual. O Brother (the title's lifted from Preston Sturges' classic 1941 comedy Sullivan's Travels) is furthermore graced with glowing, burnished photography from Roger Deakins and a masterly soundtrack from T-Bone Burnett that pays loving homage to American 30s folk-styles: blues, gospel, bluegrass, jazz and more. And just to prove that the brothers haven't lost their knack for bad-taste humour, we get a Ku Klux Klan rally choreographed like something between a Nuremberg rally and a Busby Berkeley musical. --Philip KempOn the DVD: This two-disc set duplicates the original single-disc release of the film which included a handful of cast and crew interviews, and adds an additional disc with more interviews, two brief behind-the-scenes featurettes about the production design and the post-production digital colouring of the film, a couple of storyboard-to-scene comparisons and a music video of "Man of Constant Sorrow". There's also a 16-minute documentary to promote the companion Down from the Mountain concert. Frankly there's not a lot here to justify spreading it across two discs: a more pleasing not to say generous offering would have been to cram all these extras onto Disc 1 and give us Down from the Mountain as the second disc. --Mark Walker

  • Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters [DVD] Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters | DVD | (24/06/2013) from £1.98  |  Saving you £16.60 (83.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    There are too many body parts flying around Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters to single out the tongue that has nearly been gnawed off in the cheek of its clever premise that fairy-tale heroes have grown up into savage supernatural mercenaries. Jeremy Renner and Gemma Arterton strut around like 18th-century Avengers in leather uniforms, cursing up a storm of modern vernacular and bearing an inventive array of historically and mechanically impossible weapons such as grenades, crossbows, tasers, machine guns, and other weapons of witch-killing mass destruction. It's all a big joke of course, and one that the movie wears boldly and without a shred of irony. To quibble with its gaps in narrative logic or be righteously indignant that the script is often a slapdash mess is to miss the point that it's all meant to be a pile of plain old silly fun. After their childhood trauma at the gingerbread house, the famous Teutonic siblings are now in the business of killing witches full time, hiring themselves out to villages plagued by ugly, evil women wearing loads of scary makeup (Famke Janssen being the evilest and scariest) who feed on the townsfolk's kids. They do their job well and the movie spares no opportunity to show the effect of their fantastical arsenal with profusions of firepower, explosions, viscera, and disgusting cartoon violence, decapitation being the most favoured method of killing by the movie and the title characters both. As the latest in the trend of revisionist fairy-tale telling, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters takes the low road whenever possible, but it does so with a blithe spirit, a foul mouth, and the above-mentioned gore galore to create a B-movie soul that pities any sort of critical over-analysing. It's also pretty funny. There are several inspired offhand moments, such as the missing-children notices slapped on the sides of farmers' milk cans or the way Hansel has to make time for insulin injections because of the gingerbread overdoses he endured at the hand of the proto witch he and Gretel encountered as children. The art direction, wardrobe, and anachronistically engineered props that propel the story all have a cool steampunk design theme and make the silliness pretty hard to resist. Renner, Arterton, and Janssen aren't really taking things too seriously, which is fine because neither are we. This is the American debut of Norwegian director Tommy Wirkola, who brings the same playful gross-out sensibility he did to his 2009 feature Dead Snow. That one was about long-dormant Nazi soldiers rising up as zombies. What fun! It was a lark and a goof, just like Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters. --Ted Fry

  • Barbara Currie - Seven Secrets Of Yoga [2001] Barbara Currie - Seven Secrets Of Yoga | DVD | (27/12/2001) from £3.69  |  Saving you £16.30 (81.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    With the slinky white leotards, the pastel set and the references to toning and firming, yoga purists might be quick to dismiss Barbara Currie’s Seven Secrets of Yoga as yoga for middle England. Yet Barbara Currie is the Delia Smith of the yoga world--it’s not just that what she does works, but she knows exactly how to make it work for the rest of us. Though the title implies that this is a session divided into seven segments, there are in fact more than seven parts: a choice of two 10-minute miracles (beginners and advanced) recommended to start the day, followed by a series of six short sequences designed to work either as a sequence a day, or together in an entire, comprehensive session. Currie’s precise instruction covers balancing the body and mind, working the lower back and toning bottom and thighs, toning the tummy and waist, working the arms and neckline, stretching the entire body and relaxing. Though the focus appears to be toning up, the real surprise is at the end when Currie cleverly reveals the seven secrets: yoga is good for shape, weight, energy, relaxation, concentration, flexibility and youth. This is a succinct and inspiring explanation of the philosophy of yoga.--Lorna V

  • Mrs Doubtfire [1993] Mrs Doubtfire | DVD | (30/07/2001) from £3.99  |  Saving you £9.00 (69.30%)  |  RRP £12.99

    This huge 1993 hit for Robin Williams and director Chris Columbus (Home Alone), based on a novel called Alias Madame Doubtfire by Anne Fine, stars Williams as a loving but flaky father estranged from his frustrated wife (Sally Field). Devastated by a court order limiting his time with the children, Williams's character disguises himself as a warm, old British nanny who becomes the kids' best friend. As with Dustin Hoffman's performance in Tootsie, Williams's drag act--buried under layers of latex and padding--is the show, and everything and everyone else on screen serves his sometimes frantic role. Since that's the case, it's fortunate that Williams is Williams, and his performance is terribly funny at times and exceptionally believable in those scenes where his character misses his children. Playing Williams's brother, a professional makeup artist, Harvey Fierstein has a good support role in a bright sequence where he tries a number of feminine looks on Williams before settling on Mrs Doubtfire's visage. --Tom Keogh

  • An Officer And A Gentleman [1981] An Officer And A Gentleman | DVD | (09/04/2001) from £3.98  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Richard Gere plays an enrollee at a Naval officers candidate school and Debra Winger is the woman who wants him.That's pretty much it, story-wise, in this romantic drama, which is more effective in a moment-to-moment, scene-by-scene way, where the two stars and Oscar-winner Louis Gossett Jr.--as Gere's tough-as-nails drill instructor--are fun to watch. Sexy, syrupy, with occasional pitches of high drama (Gere having a near-breakdown during training is pretty strong), An Officer and a Gentleman proves to be a no-brainer date movie. --Tom Keogh

  • Trainspotting [Special Edition] Trainspotting | DVD | (01/06/2009) from £2.59  |  Saving you £11.60 (72.50%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family... This is the story of Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) and his so-called friends - a bunch of losers liars psychos thieves and junkies. Hilarious but harrowing the film charts the disintegration of their friendship as they proceed seemingly towards self-destruction. Mark alone has the insight and opportunity to escape his fate - but then again does he really want to ""choose life""?

  • Johnny English/Johnny English Reborn Box Set [DVD] Johnny English/Johnny English Reborn Box Set | DVD | (13/02/2012) from £5.00  |  Saving you £17.99 (78.30%)  |  RRP £22.99

    Titles Comprise:Johnny English: He knows no fear. He knows no danger. He knows nothing!Bumbling British intelligence officer Johnny English has to step into the breach when all his fellow agents are suddenly bumped off. With the machinations of mysterious millionaire Pascal Sauvage becoming increasingly threatening, it's up to Johnny to save the crown jewels and the very fate of the Royal family!Johnny English Reborn: Rowan Atkinson returns to the role of the accidental secret agent who doesn't know fear or danger in the comedy spy-thriller Johnny English Reborn. In his latest adventure, the most unlikely intelligence officer in Her Majesty's Secret Service must stop a group of international assassins before they eliminate a world leader and cause global chaos. In the years since MI-7's top spy vanished off the grid, he has been honing his unique skills in a remote region of Asia. But when his agency superiors learn of an attempt against the Chinese premier's life, they must hunt down the highly unorthodox agent. Now that the world needs him once again, Johnny English is back in action. With one shot at redemption, he must employ the latest in hi-tech gadgets to unravel a web of conspiracy that runs throughout the KGB, CIA and even MI-7. With mere days until a heads of state conference, one man must use every trick in his playbook to protect us all...

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